Advertising
Advertising

10 Morning Habits of Successful People That You Should Learn

10 Morning Habits of Successful People That You Should Learn

Do you want to develop a morning routine that starts you on the road to success?Be thoughtful about the habits you are starting to develop and the results will be amazing. Here are some habits of successful people to which you can ascribe part of their success. There is however no magic routine. These are all great tips, but it is up to you to decide which fit your life.

1. They get important things done early

Sunrise Of A Mountain With Lake And Mist-min

    Do you know that feeling of mental fatigue at the end of the day?

    Humans have limited willpower. It runs out as the day progresses. This is called “ego depletion”, or decision fatigue. Decision fatigue particularly describes how every time you have to exercise willpower to make a decision you lose some willpower juice. Get your most important things done first in the morning while you still have full focus and mental power.

    Mark Twain is often quoted saying “Eat a live frog first thing in the morning, and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day”. Start with the frogs, and take easier decisions and do easier things as the day progresses. Speaking of food in the morning, it’s actually good for you to not eat in the morning (link).

    What you can do: plan your most important and difficult tasks in the morning. There are several tasks that can help you determine the most important tasks but we recommend the GTD Method.

    2. They set serious priorities

    Priorities are what focus you during the day. Steve Jobs reportedly started the day by looking in the mirrors and asking himself a question: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” (This is especially apropos for someone that died from a disease at a young age).

    Whether you want to go as extreme as he did or not, start your day by determining what really matters.

    What you can do: take time in your mornings to determine to-do items things matter to you.

    If you have trouble deciding, I recommend the Eisenhower matrix.

    Advertising

    Tools: Eisenhower matrix

    3. They start with their end goal in mind

    Vinatge Porsche Car Driving Through Tunnel-min

      It is fascinating how many people have no goals and then are surprised they aren’t getting anywhere. If you define where you want to be at the end of the day you can decide what things matter most in order to reach your goal. The best short-term goals have a long-term goal associated with them.

      Ron Friedman describes the start of his day: “Ask yourself this question the moment you sit at your desk: The day is over and I am leaving the office with a tremendous sense of accomplishment. What have I achieved?”

      What you can do: start your day by asking yourself what would need to happen for you to be satisfied by the end of the day.

      The tool I recommend for this is the visualization method — Imagine yourself at the end of the day to discover what you want to have accomplished.

      4. They start with the tasks they gave themselves yesterday

      Man writing things down

        Kenneth Chenault (American Express CEO) writes down tomorrows tasks at the end of the day. This means that when his day starts he knows where to begin.  No more fidgeting start-up time. By defining tasks for your future self  at the end of  the day you can start the day with full momentum.

        What you can do: at the end of the day, write down tasks for your future self.

        Tool: Any.do todo manager

        Advertising

        5. They have a morning routine

        The human body is made for structure. This is reflected in our biological cycle, the circadian rhythm. Both your body and mind will function a lot smoother if your morning is structured. it prevents you from wandering aimlessly (which a loft of people do). Personally I like making a matcha tea, or bulletproof matcha in the morning.

        Anna Wintour, Vogue editor-in-chief for plays an intense tennis match every morning. Margaret Thatcher, former U.K. prime minister apparently got up every day to listen to the “Farming Today” radio show. This part of the routine centered each of these successful people for decision-making throughout the remainder of the day.

        What you can do: choose a morning routine and stick to it.

        Tool: Post-its, I have them hanging around as a reminder of my routine

        6. They have a structured life

        As we discussed above, a morning routine is important. The truly productive use this structured morning as a template for the rest of the day. Once you gained momentum in the day, be sure to use that to fuel you for the rest of the day. Structure and productivity are very close friends.

        Benjamin Franklin is a great example of a man with a structured morning and day:

        Benjamin Franklin

          What you can do: structure your days. If your days differ, plan weekly.

          Tool: Google Calendar

          7. They get and stay in shape

          Advertising

          Girl Wearing Walking Boots Hiking Up A Mountain-min

            Barack Obama plays sports in the morning. If someone that has such a structured schedule as the President of the United States does can find time for exercise, so can you.

            The reason exercise is quite simple. The human body functions best if it is used  for physical activity. In fact, playing sports doesn’t only improve your body, it develops your mental power. Remember the ego depletion we talked about? Exercise is a great way to buffer it. Studies actually show that exercise (and/or taking a nap) increase your willpower.

            Note: good food has an even bigger impact than exercise.

            What you can do: Exercise in the morning. No equipment needed.

            Tool: Books by Pavel Tsatsouline

            8. They work hard but make time for family and leisure

            No matter how productive your morning is, always make time for family and relaxation. Take the two successful US political figures: Obama and Franklin. Both of them were/are obviously incredible busy and successful. Both of them however make/made time for their family and to try and wind down.

            Franklin was known to make time to read, and while it is not a morning habit Obama always tries to have dinner with his family.

            What you can do: in your mornings, plan ahead some time for leisure and family.

            Tools: Goodreads, Whatsapp group

            9. They meditate

            Advertising

            Man Watching Sunrise On Baconey-min

              Meditation is great for productivity and your overall mood. Both the morning and night are perfect opportunities to incorporate this habit. Tim Ferriss is a great proponent of meditation in the morning. He is a best-selling writer on productivity and health and has shared that he uses meditation to start his day.

              Meditation is pretty easy to start off with.

              What you can do: meditate after waking up, incorporate it into your morning routine.

              Tool: Headspace app

              10. They use the morning go get inspired and motivated

              Nothing sets the tone of your day like how  you start it.

              Tony Robbins is known to use the morning to list a number of things he is grateful for, and to get himself psyched up for the day. It’s a consistent morning routine that gets him going.

              What you can do: think of some things you are grateful for in the morning.

              Tool: Trainings by Tony Robbins

              More by this author

              23 Body Language Tricks That Make You Instantly Likeable 17 Small Things To Do Every Day To Be Much Smarter How To Hold Your Breath For 4+ Minutes 8 Christmas Drink Recipes To Warm Up Your Holiday Parties 10 Morning Habits of Successful People That You Should Learn

              Trending in Productivity

              1 How to Prevent Decision Fatigue From Clouding Your Judgement 2 5 Less-Known Reasons Why Less is More 3 10 Smart Productivity Software to Boost Work Performance 4 How to Take Good Notes at Work: 6 Effective Ways 5 3 Techniques for Setting Priorities Effectively

              Read Next

              Advertising
              Advertising
              Advertising

              Last Updated on July 8, 2020

              How to Prevent Decision Fatigue From Clouding Your Judgement

              How to Prevent Decision Fatigue From Clouding Your Judgement

              What is decision fatigue? Let me explain this with an example:

              When determining a court ruling, there are many factors that contribute to their final verdict. You probably assume that the judge’s decision is influenced solely by the nature of the crime committed or the particular laws that were broken. While this is completely valid, there is an even greater influential factor that dictates the judge’s decision: the time of day.

              In 2012, a research team from Columbia University[1] examined 1,112 court rulings set in place by a Parole Board Judge over a 10 month period. The judge would have to determine whether the individuals in question would be released from prison on parole, or a change in the parole terms.

              While the facts of the case often take precedence in decision making, the judges mental state had an alarming influence on their verdict.

              As the day goes on, the chance of a favorable ruling drops:

              Advertising

                Image source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

                Does the time of day, or the judges level of hunger really contribute that greatly to their decision making? Yes, it does.

                The research went on to show that at the start of the day the likelihood of the judging giving out a favorable ruling was somewhere around 65%.

                But as the morning dragged on, the judge became fatigued and drained from making decision after decision. As more time went on, the odds of receiving a favorable ruling decreased steadily until it was whittled down to zero.

                However, right after their lunch break, the judge would return to the courtroom feeling refreshed and recharged. Energized by their second wind, their leniency skyrockets back up to a whopping 65%. And again, as the day drags on to its finish, the favorable rulings slowly diminish along with the judge’s spirits.

                This is no coincidence. According to the carefully recorded research, this was true for all 1,112 cases. The severity of the crime didn’t matter. Whether it was rape, murder, theft, or embezzlement, the criminal was more likely to get a favorable ruling either early in the morning, or after the judges lunch break.

                Advertising

                Are You Suffering from Decision Fatigue Too?

                We all suffer from decision fatigue without even realizing it.

                Perhaps you aren’t a judge with the fate of an individual’s life at your disposal, but the daily decisions you make for yourself could hinder you if you’re not in the right head-space.

                Regardless of how energetic you feel (as I imagine it is somehow caffeine induced anyway), you will still experience decision fatigue. Just like every other muscle, your brain gets tired after periods of overuse, pumping out one decision after the next. It needs a chance to rest in order to function at a productive rate.

                The Detrimental Consequences of Decision Fatigue

                When you are in a position such as a Judge, you can’t afford to let your mental state dictate your decision making; but it still does. According to George Lowenstein, an American educator and economy expert, decision fatigue is to blame for poor decision making among members of high office. The disastrous level of failure among these individuals to control their impulses could be directly related to their day to day stresses at work and their private life.

                When you’re just too tired to think, you stop caring. And once you get careless, that’s when you need to worry. Decision fatigue can contribute to a number of issues such as impulse shopping (guilty), poor decision making at work, and poor decision making with after work relationships. You know what I’m talking about. Don’t dip your pen in the company ink.

                How to Make Decision Effectively

                Either alter the time of decision making to when your mind is the most fresh, or limit the number of decisions to be made. Try utilizing the following hacks for more effective decision making.

                Advertising

                1. Make Your Most Important Decisions within the First 3 Hours

                You want to make decisions at your peak performance, so either first thing in the morning, or right after a break.

                Research has actually shown that you are the most productive for the first 3 hours[2] of your day. Utilize this time! Don’t waste it on trivial decisions such as what to wear, or mindlessly scrolling through social media.

                Instead, use this time to tweak your game plan. What do you want to accomplish? What can you improve? What steps do you need to take to reach these goals?

                2. Form Habits to Reduce Decision Making

                You don’t have to choose all the time.

                Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but it doesn’t have to be an extravagant spread every morning. Make a habit out of eating a similar or quick breakfast, and cut that step of your morning out of the way. Can’t decide what to wear? Pick the first thing that catches your eye. We both know that after 20 minutes of changing outfits you’ll just go with the first thing anyway.

                Powerful individuals such as Steve Jobs, Barack Obama, and Mark Zuckerberg don’t waste their precious time deciding what to wear. In fact, they have been known to limiting their outfits down to two options in order to reduce their daily decision making.

                Advertising

                3. Take Frequent Breaks for a Clearer Mind

                You are at your peak of productivity after a break, so to reap the benefits, you need to take lots of breaks! I know, what a sacrifice. If judges make better decisions in the morning and after their lunch break, then so will you.

                The reason for this is because the belly is now full, and the hunger is gone. Roy Baumeister, Florida State University social psychologist[3] had found that low-glucose levels take a negative toll on decision making. By taking a break to replenish your glucose levels, you will be able to focus better and improve your decision making abilities.

                Even if you aren’t hungry, little breaks are still necessary to let your mind refresh, and come back being able to think more clearly.

                Structure your break times. Decide beforehand when you will take breaks, and eat energy sustaining snacks so that your energy level doesn’t drop too low. The time you “lose” during your breaks will be made up in the end, as your productivity will increase after each break.

                So instead of slogging through your day, letting your mind deteriorate and fall victim to the daily abuses of decision making, take a break, eat a snack. Let your mind refresh and reset, and jump-start your productivity throughout the day.

                More Tips About Decision Making

                Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

                Reference

                Read Next