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10 Morning Habits of Successful People That You Should Learn

10 Morning Habits of Successful People That You Should Learn

Do you want to develop a morning routine that starts you on the road to success?Be thoughtful about the habits you are starting to develop and the results will be amazing. Here are some habits of successful people to which you can ascribe part of their success. There is however no magic routine. These are all great tips, but it is up to you to decide which fit your life.

1. They get important things done early

Sunrise Of A Mountain With Lake And Mist-min

    Do you know that feeling of mental fatigue at the end of the day?

    Humans have limited willpower. It runs out as the day progresses. This is called “ego depletion”, or decision fatigue. Decision fatigue particularly describes how every time you have to exercise willpower to make a decision you lose some willpower juice. Get your most important things done first in the morning while you still have full focus and mental power.

    Mark Twain is often quoted saying “Eat a live frog first thing in the morning, and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day”. Start with the frogs, and take easier decisions and do easier things as the day progresses. Speaking of food in the morning, it’s actually good for you to not eat in the morning (link).

    What you can do: plan your most important and difficult tasks in the morning. There are several tasks that can help you determine the most important tasks but we recommend the GTD Method.

    2. They set serious priorities

    Priorities are what focus you during the day. Steve Jobs reportedly started the day by looking in the mirrors and asking himself a question: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” (This is especially apropos for someone that died from a disease at a young age).

    Whether you want to go as extreme as he did or not, start your day by determining what really matters.

    What you can do: take time in your mornings to determine to-do items things matter to you.

    If you have trouble deciding, I recommend the Eisenhower matrix.

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    Tools: Eisenhower matrix

    3. They start with their end goal in mind

    Vinatge Porsche Car Driving Through Tunnel-min

      It is fascinating how many people have no goals and then are surprised they aren’t getting anywhere. If you define where you want to be at the end of the day you can decide what things matter most in order to reach your goal. The best short-term goals have a long-term goal associated with them.

      Ron Friedman describes the start of his day: “Ask yourself this question the moment you sit at your desk: The day is over and I am leaving the office with a tremendous sense of accomplishment. What have I achieved?”

      What you can do: start your day by asking yourself what would need to happen for you to be satisfied by the end of the day.

      The tool I recommend for this is the visualization method — Imagine yourself at the end of the day to discover what you want to have accomplished.

      4. They start with the tasks they gave themselves yesterday

      Man writing things down

        Kenneth Chenault (American Express CEO) writes down tomorrows tasks at the end of the day. This means that when his day starts he knows where to begin.  No more fidgeting start-up time. By defining tasks for your future self  at the end of  the day you can start the day with full momentum.

        What you can do: at the end of the day, write down tasks for your future self.

        Tool: Any.do todo manager

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        5. They have a morning routine

        The human body is made for structure. This is reflected in our biological cycle, the circadian rhythm. Both your body and mind will function a lot smoother if your morning is structured. it prevents you from wandering aimlessly (which a loft of people do). Personally I like making a matcha tea, or bulletproof matcha in the morning.

        Anna Wintour, Vogue editor-in-chief for plays an intense tennis match every morning. Margaret Thatcher, former U.K. prime minister apparently got up every day to listen to the “Farming Today” radio show. This part of the routine centered each of these successful people for decision-making throughout the remainder of the day.

        What you can do: choose a morning routine and stick to it.

        Tool: Post-its, I have them hanging around as a reminder of my routine

        6. They have a structured life

        As we discussed above, a morning routine is important. The truly productive use this structured morning as a template for the rest of the day. Once you gained momentum in the day, be sure to use that to fuel you for the rest of the day. Structure and productivity are very close friends.

        Benjamin Franklin is a great example of a man with a structured morning and day:

        Benjamin Franklin

          What you can do: structure your days. If your days differ, plan weekly.

          Tool: Google Calendar

          7. They get and stay in shape

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          Girl Wearing Walking Boots Hiking Up A Mountain-min

            Barack Obama plays sports in the morning. If someone that has such a structured schedule as the President of the United States does can find time for exercise, so can you.

            The reason exercise is quite simple. The human body functions best if it is used  for physical activity. In fact, playing sports doesn’t only improve your body, it develops your mental power. Remember the ego depletion we talked about? Exercise is a great way to buffer it. Studies actually show that exercise (and/or taking a nap) increase your willpower.

            Note: good food has an even bigger impact than exercise.

            What you can do: Exercise in the morning. No equipment needed.

            Tool: Books by Pavel Tsatsouline

            8. They work hard but make time for family and leisure

            No matter how productive your morning is, always make time for family and relaxation. Take the two successful US political figures: Obama and Franklin. Both of them were/are obviously incredible busy and successful. Both of them however make/made time for their family and to try and wind down.

            Franklin was known to make time to read, and while it is not a morning habit Obama always tries to have dinner with his family.

            What you can do: in your mornings, plan ahead some time for leisure and family.

            Tools: Goodreads, Whatsapp group

            9. They meditate

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            Man Watching Sunrise On Baconey-min

              Meditation is great for productivity and your overall mood. Both the morning and night are perfect opportunities to incorporate this habit. Tim Ferriss is a great proponent of meditation in the morning. He is a best-selling writer on productivity and health and has shared that he uses meditation to start his day.

              Meditation is pretty easy to start off with.

              What you can do: meditate after waking up, incorporate it into your morning routine.

              Tool: Headspace app

              10. They use the morning go get inspired and motivated

              Nothing sets the tone of your day like how  you start it.

              Tony Robbins is known to use the morning to list a number of things he is grateful for, and to get himself psyched up for the day. It’s a consistent morning routine that gets him going.

              What you can do: think of some things you are grateful for in the morning.

              Tool: Trainings by Tony Robbins

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              Last Updated on June 18, 2019

              The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

              The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

              No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

              Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

              Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

              A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

              Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

              In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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              From Making Reminders to Building Habits

              A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

              For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

              This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

              The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

              That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

              Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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              The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

              Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

              But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

              The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

              The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

              A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

              For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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              But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

              If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

              For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

              These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

              For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

              How to Make a Reminder Works for You

              Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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              Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

              Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

              My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

              Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

              I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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              Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

              Reference

              [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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