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What You Need To Know Before Becoming A Hairdresser

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What You Need To Know Before Becoming A Hairdresser

Everyone likes getting their hair done. Some of us just love getting new styles and colours each time we go and others of us are so passionate about hair that we want to be the hairdresser and not the client.

The idea of taking a boring head of mousy brown hair and transforming it into long blonde tresses is all too tempting for the hair fashionistas amongst us. But there are some things you should know before you go down to your local college to book a place on the next course.

Yes indeed, there are some shocking truths about this profession you may not have considered and so it’s well worth your while to hang about and have a read.

1. You Will Find College Expensive

It can cost thousands of dollars to get a place in a reputable training college. This means you will likely have to take out a loan or if you have the patience, save up to train for your dream profession.

2. You Will Be Training on an Ongoing Basis

As with technology and many more industries today you will need ongoing training even after you have qualified as a hairdresser. Fashion is continuously changing, and equipment and hairstyling techniques are changing all the time as well.

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If you don’t keep in tune with these changes it won’t be long before you’re losing clients.

3. You Have To Be Interested in Fashion

In order to survive in any business you’ve gotta be passionate about it and hairdressing is no different. Your customers will spot you a mile off if you lack enthusiasm and interest in the latest trends.

Have a look in the mirror and decide if you think you are making a statement of your own. What does your image say about your sense of fashion? Is this really the industry for you?

4. You Will Be On Your Feet All Day

There is no time for sitting down in a busy salon. You will stand  for hours while one customer after another comes in for their upstyle or blowdry.

You will welcome any odd jobs like running to the local shop for change as you’ll get to move around and stretch your legs.

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5.You Will Find it Hard To Please Some Customers

Like any other service industry you will get complaints from time to time. You will have to remain professional and learn how to please the customer no matter what.

6. You Will Have To Be Pleasant

It doesn’t matter if you were out the night before, have your period, or are just feeling down – you have to keep smiling when you’re dealing with customers.

This is harder than it sounds and can be draining for even the most happy-go-lucky types.

7. You Will Have To Practise

Hair can be difficult to manage and cutting techniques aren’t all that easy to pick up. It will take a lot of practise and dedication to become a good hairdresser. Be sure you are prepared to make this commitment.

8. You Will Work Long Hours

In most salons the hours are very long. You could be on your feet for nine or ten hours each day – you could also be up very early if you have to do the styling for wedding parties.

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9. You Will Hurt Yourself

There are many risks to working in a salon from burns (curling irons), allergic reactions (colours and other products), cuts (scissors) and trips and slips from wires left hanging around.

You have to be very safety conscious working in a salon, both for yourself and your clients.

10. Your Creativity Will be Stifled

You may want to turn all of your customers into Beyonce or David Beckham but unfortunately the reality is that most people are very conservative with their hair. You will have to respect their needs and just go with what they want – they’re paying after all.

11. You’ll Need Energy

Hairdressing is physically draining work. Washing hair, sweeping floors, applying colours, blowdrying – it’s all work and you will need to develop upper body strength to keep up with the demands of a busy salon.

Be prepared for a workout because that is what you have in store for you everyday.

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12. You Will Struggle to Find Work

As a junior you will have to hunt down a job that will probably not even pay very well. Get ready to promote yourself to many prospective employers before you get your break.

13. You Have to Work for Years to Make Decent Money

The best way to make money as a hairstylist is to set up your own salon – however, you will have to gain a lot of experience before you will be ready for that.
Be sure that you are willing to put in the time in the long term to reach your goal of having your own salon.

14. You Will Have to Talk to Your Customers

You will have to develop conversational skills – this is harder than it sounds. Clients like to talk about their problems and it will be up to you to listen empathically and respond appropriately.

So, how are you feeling now, are you thinking twice about your dream job or do you still feel that brushing bangs and snipping fringes is the only career for you?

If you have been doing your sister’s hair since you were small then maybe this is the career for you. Either way – don’t say you weren’t warned.

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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