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6 Places You Can Learn a New Skill Online

6 Places You Can Learn a New Skill Online

We’re lucky enough to live during a time in which almost every single piece of information known to mankind is available to almost anyone searching for it. And you don’t need to shell out tens of thousands of dollars on a college degree to start learning, either. There are countless websites out there to help start you out on the path toward learning a new skill. Whether you want to pick up a new hobby or make yourself more marketable, the Internet is there to help. While many of the following services offer most for those willing to pay for premium memberships, they all have a lot to offer free of charge.

1. Learn to code

Computer programming is becoming an increasingly prevalent and marketable skill in the modern world. Luckily, sites like Koding can help get you started from the ground up by providing users with a cloud-based environment where they have access to a network of over one million of their peers. You can start by reading through a number of guides designed to get beginners on their feet, then move onto chatting and working with other more advanced programmers.

Best of all, it’s absolutely free!

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2. Learn a new language

If programming isn’t for you and you’d rather stick to human languages, sites such as Duolingo have you covered. Using Duolingo, you can learn Spanish, French, Portugese, Italian, and much more through lessons that build on one another as your skills increase. You’ll start with simple tasks, such as learning nouns, adjectives, and verbs, eventually being able to string sentences together fluently.

And — I can’t believe I’m saying this again — it’s totally free!

3. Learn to speed read

While reading for pleasure or information is one of the more wholesome activities you can undertake, it can also be time consuming. However, Spreeder aims to help you cut down on the time it takes to get through articles and novels without allowing any information to slip by you. By weaning you off of subvocalization, Spreeder not only trains you to increase your reading speed by up to four times, but also helps ensure your reading comprehension increases as well.

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Although Spreeder is free, it’s part of a larger program titled 7SpeedReading, which is a much larger and more in-depth premium program.

4. Learn to draw

Drawing is one of those skills that most people just assume you either have or don’t. But that simply isn’t the case. Anyone dedicated enough can learn the techniques artists use to create beautiful masterpieces. Sites like Drawspace offer a variety of lessons, from art history and terminology to strategies and tips to take your drawing skills to the next level.

Although many of the lessons on Drawspace are free, to get the full effect you need to become a paying member.

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5. Learn to play music

Similar to drawing, people tend to think they aren’t “musically inclined” and will shy away from trying to learn an instrument — even if they really want to give it a go. Luckily, those hesitant to pick up an instrument and play in front of a master instructor can use sites like LessonFace to take virtual lessons on anything from guitar and piano to singing and rapping. While you will be interacting with actual teachers, doing so through a computer screen is much less nerve-wracking than playing in front of actual people.

Though there are many sites that offer standard lessons free of charge, LessonFace is more of a “middleman” that connects learners to master instructors who offer their services for a variety of fees.

6. Become a photographer

Ironically, despite the fact that true photography is just as difficult as playing music or creating art, services like Instagram have led everyone to believe that it’s incredibly easy. Of course, that’s not the case. To get you started as a true photographer, however, Lifehacker offers a five-part lesson, from understanding the equipment to the various techniques involved in bringing still photos to life.

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If you’re that serious about photography, be prepared to shell out a pretty penny for even the most basic equipment. But you can’t really put a price tag on a new skill or hobby, can you?

Featured photo credit: the goddess of folk metal / M. Jeremy Goldman via farm1.staticflickr.com

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Matt Duczeminski

A passionate writer who shares lifestlye tips on Lifehack

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Last Updated on January 25, 2021

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

Perfectionism sounds like a first world problem, but it stifles creative minds. Having a great idea but doubting your ability to execute it can leave you afraid to just complete and publish it. Some of the most successful inventors failed, but they kept going in pursuit of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, perfectionism can hinder people when they spend too much time seeking recognition, gathering awards and wasting time patting themselves on the back. Whatever your art, go make good art and don’t spend time worrying that your idea isn’t perfect enough and certainly don’t waste time coming up with a new idea because you’re still congratulating yourself for the last one.

1. Remember, perfection is subjective.

If you’re worried about achieving perfectionism with any single project so much that you find yourself afraid to just finish it, then you aren’t being productive. Take a hard look at your work, edit and revise, then send it our into the world. If the reviews aren’t the greatest, learn from the feedback so you can improve next time.

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2. Procrastination masquerades itself as perfectionism.

People who procrastinate aren’t always lazy or trying to get out of doing something. Many who procrastinate do so because perfectionism is killing their productivity, telling them that if they wait a better idea will come to them.

3. Recognize actions that waste time.

Artists and all creative people need time to incubate; those ideas will only grow when properly watered, but if you’re not engaging in an activity that will help foster creativity, you might just be wasting time. Remember to do everything with purpose, even relaxing.

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4. Don’t discriminate against your worth.

No one is actually perfect. We often have tremendous ideas or write things that move people emotionally, but no one attains that final state of being perfect. So, don’t get down if your second idea isn’t as good as your first—or vice versa. Perfectionists tend to be the toughest critics of their work, so don’t criticize yourself. You are not your work no matter how good or how bad.

5. Stress races your heart and freezes your innovation.

Stress is a cyclic killer that perfectionists know well because that same system that engages and causes your palms to sweat over a great idea is the same system that kicks in and worries you that you’re not good enough. Perfectionism means striving for that ultimate level, and stress can propel you forward excitedly or leave you shaking in fear of the next step.

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6. Meeting deadlines beats waiting for perfect work.

Don’t let your fear of failure prevent you from meeting your deadline. Perfection is subjective and if you’re wasting time or procrastinating, you should just finish the job and learn from any mistakes. Being productive means completing work. You shouldn’t try for months or even years to perfect one project when you can produce projects that improve over time.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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