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Learn Coding For Free With These 10 Sites

Learn Coding For Free With These 10 Sites

Programming, or coding, is a vital skill that many people are learning today. With the expansion of technology and the increasing demand of developers, learning to code could prove to be invaluable. Not only is it a highly sought-after skill by companies worldwide, it is also one that you can easily learn for free. There are sites that will allow you to learn plenty of programming languages without any charge and at your own pace.

For those who are looking to learn how to code, here are ten sites that will be more than happy to teach you:

1. Coursera

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    Coursera is a platform that offers college-level classes to members for no charge (certificate earning courses non-withstanding). While they have a vast array of courses available in different subjects, languages, and professions, they do have quite a library of classes that are all about learning to code. You can create a free account with them, pick out classes based on start dates, and go forth at your own pace. For those who are looking to learn at their own pace and on their own time, Coursera is a great option and has classes that are open almost constantly.

    2. Github

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      Github is like a reference book for coders. Indeed, it is a near hive-mind of books referencing programming as well as an incredible amount of posts from users — displaying their own programming endeavours, along with lessons and questions. In fact, if you are a professional programmer, many industry professionals will recommend making a Github profile to show off some of your own work. Users are free to browse it at their leisure and interact with the dedicated community, post questions, and learn as they go.  It is a well-rounded and invaluable resource when it comes to learning to code.

      3. CodeAcademy

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        Of course, no list on this subject would be complete without the inclusion of CodeAcademy. The extremely simple and interactive site hosts more than 24 million people learning to code for free and also offers plenty of languages to learn, including CSS, Javascript, PHP, HTML, and many others. This site has earned its popularity for a reason – it has been proven effective and is quite fun to use as well. You go through each lesson step-by-step and CodeAcademy keeps records of your progress. All in all, this is one of the easiest sites to use and has plenty of options for those who are looking to learn how to seriously code.

        4. Udemy

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          Udemy is an online learning platform that was setup originally for professionals looking to learn or improve their job skills. While some courses do indeed have to be paid for, they also offer plenty of free programming lessons via videos. Udemy is directed towards learning to code in a business environment, but it does have courses that are well designed and the videos are simple to follow along with. For those who are looking to go into business for themselves or are seeking a way to improve their job skills, Udemy is a great platform and always has lots in the way of choices.

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          5. MIT Open Courseware

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            MIT, aka the school for tech geniuses, actually offers free versions of its courses online for those looking to learn. Again, like Coursera, they come in a multitude of different areas of study and topics, but seeing as it is MIT, the focus on technology and coding is quite strong. All of the courses come with lecture notes, videos, and plenty of extra resources so that those looking to learn can get the gist of everything going on. They even have homework to help those who prefer to learn in the more traditional school style. Naturally, the quality is top notch.

            6. edX

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              edX is, funnily enough, a platform developed by Harvard University and MIT as of 2012 – talk about quality! In fact, the Introduction to Computer Science course from Harvard University that is available is one that new coders should not miss. With just two starting schools in 2012, EdX now includes sixty-plus schools and offers cutting-edge courses on technology. Once again, for those who enjoy a more traditional schooling sense, edX is something to look into.

              7. Khan Academy

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                One of the originals in online-learning offerings, Khan Academy focuses heavily on technology, math, and computer science – all for free! The lessons come in the way of step-by-step tutorial videos and have been proven highly effective with the million-or-so users that visit Khan Academy regularly. Like the other sites, you have your choice of programming languages, but the platform itself is exceptionally open and easy to navigate.

                8. Code Avengers

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                  All of this is starting to sound a bit too much like work, isn’t it? How about a site that teaches you to code for free with a more fun and personable approach? New Zealand-based company Code Avengers is all about interactivity, as it aims to teach users how to code games, apps, and websites with various languages. The time sink for each course is about twelve hours and they are available in multiple languages. Even if twelve hours sounds like a lot, compare it to a four-year school and then factor in the cost — yeah, exactly.

                  9. Free Code Camp

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                    If you want to have fun AND do something good for humanity (not counting just yourself), then Free Code Camp is for you. The community of professionals and students work together on helping hone their coding skills to the goal of building apps for free. Where does the feel-good altruism come in? Your code is available to nonprofits. How is that for an incentive?

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                    10. Hack.pledge

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                      Interestingly enough, this site is a community of developers who are dedicated to helping those who want to learn how to code. What’s even more interesting is that the teachers are some of the most high profile coders in the world, such as Bram Cohen — the inventor of BitTorrent. Where better to learn than from the masters?

                      No matter which site you select, they all offer the experience and knowledge for those interested in learning to learn how to code at no cost. If you’ve been making any excuses, they’ve just gone out the window. Get coding and have fun with it!

                      Featured photo credit: hackny via flickr.com

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                      Learn to code Learn Coding For Free With These 10 Sites 4 Ways to Send a Money Transfer Online INDX.guru 8 Powerful Hidden Features in Stock Market Apps You’ve Probably Missed 4 Apps To Turn You Into A Stock Market Pro (You Should Use) “I would be so successful if someone just gave me a shot”, you might think. Why not be the one to give youreself a shot? Many people out there have mindsets and attitudes that set them up for failure. They might answer my question with, “That's a crazy idea!” or “I've already tried that!” but how much of that is just making excuses? When it comes to limiting your own success, there are ten particular mindsets that turn those answers into self-fulfilling prophecy: 1. Loafing You'll write that novel just as soon as you're done with your favorite show. Oh, but now you're hungry. You'll get started after a snack. Oh, but now that snack has made you sleepy – a little nap couldn't hurt, right? One of the hardest parts, and the most obvious, of achieving success is the actual work. Procrastinating, making excuses or tricking yourself into loafing is just going to cement the fact that nothing will ever get done. It might not sound pretty, or even too easy, but the easiest way to get to success is to just jump in and get going (which is exactly how I got started). 2. Blaming It's not your fault you're not successful – the industry is bad, you don't have the money, etc, etc. When it comes down to it, however, who is the one responsible for your success? You. This is the day and age where people are launching successful start-ups in a few months, getting published online and finding their way to success one way or another. Some things might be out of your control, but blaming others is just going to waste the energy and time you need to get going. 3. Sour-grapes Being envious of the success of others is almost as bad as blaming them. All the time and energy you could be putting into your own goals is going towards a person who more than likely has done nothing but show you that the goal is attainable. You don't have to be applauding their success, but being envious and sour about it is a waste of time – let it roll off your shoulders and dig down towards accomplishing your own goals. 4. Minimizing others success Again, you don't have to be cheering and raving about the success of others, but minimizing their accomplishments looks bad on you and on your own goals. If you attained success, would you want others rolling their eyes and treating it like it is not a big deal in the slightest? I highly doubt it. “So they climbed Mount Everest, big whoop. Plenty of people have done it before”. Have you? 5. Talking You're going to do this, you're going to do that – the proof is in the pudding, ultimately. Talking about your goals and what you're going to accomplish is all well and good, but talking time is better spent actually doing. Talking about your goals has actually been shown to make you less likely to reach them, so zip up those chattering lips and dive in. 6. Making assumptions You know what they say about the word ‘assume’, it makes (a word I’ll leave out of this article) out of ‘u’ and ‘me’ . Unsuccessful people are the best at making assumptions without considering other outlets or opportunities. Missed chance after missed chance can put anyone behind or completely ruin something that you poured a lot of hard work into. People are often surprised at what happens if they take a chance instead of listening to that little pessimist inside their heads. ‘Never assume’ is good advice and it is a mindset you should get out of as quickly as possible. 7. Procrastinating This one is obvious, isn't it? It's about the same as loafing, but even worse because it applies to multiple areas of our lives. That big project? Eh, its not due for a week. My dreams? Eh, I'm going to be taking a class to learn how to write in a few months, I can relax until then. Procrastinating isn't the friend of successful people. Many of them had to learn how to either make procrastination work for them or to barrel through it and press on, even with the proverbial sloth demanding you park it on the couch. 8. Naysaying “It will never work. It is impossible, I just can't ...”. That is about when it is time to take a good look at yourself. There are a plethora of people out there that once thought the same thing: you can't get a man into space, you can't find a way for a human to fly, you can't cure a disease. Well, people did what was once considered impossible. If they can defy the entire world, why can't you defy your internal pessimist and get there? Don't tell yourself that it is impossible. In the world we live in today, it seems like impossible is becoming a word that gets weaker every day, and the same is true of your goals. 9. Consuming Fast food, energy drinks, trash TV – your brain is sobbing at the thought. With all the time spent taking in things that are not good for your brain or body, how can anyone expect it to happily balance out and produce the stuff you need to achieve success? Your output should be greater than your input; though you don't have to take the starving artist spiel literally. The point is, your production is where the value is, not the absorption. 10. Quitting “Well, I tried.” Sure, you tried once. That horse is shaking its head and trotting off to find someone who will get back on it. There's nothing necessarily wrong with cutting your losses sometimes. After all, no experience is ever truly wasted, but quitting is the top enemy to successful people. If you believe in something, if you want to find that success, there is no road map. You may very well have to carve your own path through treacherous jungle. If you give up the first time a mosquito bites you then you've doomed yourself already. Success, in large part, is about the human being in the arena. People cheer for them, their struggle and victory, but the person who watches idly and scoffs, having never tried has also never really lived. Mindsets are not set in stone. It is never too late to get started and change your perspective. After all, achieving success is completely up to you – you are the one making excuses and holding yourself back. You are also the one that will decide when it is time to stand up and get back into that arena. 10 Bad Habits That Stop People From Achieving Success

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                      Published on January 19, 2021

                      What Is Learning by Doing And Why Is It Effective?

                      What Is Learning by Doing And Why Is It Effective?

                      The list of teaching techniques is ever-expanding as there are multiple ways for us to gain knowledge. As a result, there are multiple techniques out there that leverage those particular skills. One such technique I want to share with you is learning by doing.

                      This technique has been around for a long time, and it’s a surprisingly effective one thanks to the various perks that come with it. Also called experiential learning, I’ll be sharing with you my knowledge on the subject, what it is deep down, and why it’s such an effective learning tool.

                      What Is Learning by Doing?

                      Learning by doing is the simple idea that we are capable of learning more about something when we perform the action.

                      For example, say you’re looking to play a musical instrument and were wondering how all of them sound and mix. In most other techniques, you’d be playing the instrument all by yourself in a studio. Learning by doing instead gives you a basic understanding of how to play the instrument and puts you up on a stage to play an improvised piece with other musicians.

                      Another way to think about this is by taking a more active approach to something as opposed to you passively learning about it. The argument is that active engagement provides deeper learning and that it’s okay if you make mistakes as you learn from those as well. This mentality brought forth a new name for this technique: experiential learning.

                      What Are Its Benefits?

                      Experimental learning has been around for eons now. It was Aristotle who wrote that “for the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them.”

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                      Over the years, that way of thinking changed and developed and for a time was lost once computers were integrated into schools. It’s only been in recent years where schools have adopted this technique again. It’s clear why teachers are encouraging this as it offers five big benefits.

                      1. It’s More Engaging and More Memorable

                      The first benefit is that it’s more engaging and memorable. Since this requires action on your part, you’re not going to be able to weaken your performance. This is big since, traditionally, you’d learn from lectures, books, or articles, and learners could easily read—or not read—the text and walk away with no knowledge at all from it.

                      When you are forced into a situation where you have to do what you need to learn, it’s easier to remember those things. Every action provides personalized learning experiences, and it’s where motivation is built. That motivation connects to what is learned and felt. It teaches that learning is relevant and meaningful.

                      Beyond that, this experience allows the opportunity for learners to go through the learning cycle that involves extended effort, mistakes, and reflection, followed by refinement of strategies.

                      2. It Is More Personal

                      Stemming from the reason mentioned above, learning by doing offers a personal experience. Referring back to the cycle of effort, mistakes, reflection, and refinement, this cycle is only possible through personal emotions—the motivation and realization of knowledge of a particular topic tying into your values and ideals.

                      This connection is powerful and thus, offers a richer experience than reading from a book or articles such as this one. That personal connection is more important as it encourages exploration and curiosity from learners.

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                      If you’ve always wanted to bake a cake or cook a unique dish, you could read up on it or watch a video. Or you could get the ingredients and start going through it all yourself. Even if you make mistakes now, you have a better grasp of what to do for the next time you try it out. You’re also more invested in that since that’s food that you made with the intention of you having it.

                      3. It Is Community-Connected

                      Learning by doing involves the world at large rather than sitting alone in your room or a library stuck in a book. Since the whole city is your classroom technically, you’re able to leverage all kinds of things. You’re able to gather local assets and partners and connect local issues to larger global themes.

                      This leans more into the personal aspect that this technique encourages. You are part of a community, and this form of learning allows you to interact more and make a connection with it—not necessarily with the residents but certainly the environment around it.

                      4. It’s More Integrated Into People’s Lives

                      This form of learning is deeply integrated into our lives as well. Deep learning occurs best when learners can apply what they’ve learned in a classroom setting to answer questions around them that they care about.

                      Even though there is a lot of information out there, people are still always asking “what’s in it for me?” Even when it comes to learning, people will be more interested if they know that what they are learning is vital to their very way of life in some fashion. It’s forgettable if they’re unable to tie knowledge in with personal aspects of their lives. Thus, experiential learning makes the application of knowledge simpler.

                      5. It Builds Success Skills

                      The final benefit of learning by doing is that it builds up your skills for success. Learning by doing encourages you to step out of your comfort zone, discover something new, and try things out for the first time. You’re bound to make a mistake or two, but this technique doesn’t shame you for it.

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                      As a result, learning by doing can build your initiative for new things as well as persistence towards growth and development in a field. This could also lead to team management and collaboration skill growth. These are all vital things in personal growth as we move towards the future.

                      How to Get Started

                      While all these perks are helpful for you, how are you going to start? Well, there are several different approaches that you can take with this. Here are some of them that come to mind.

                      1. Low-Stakes Quizzes

                      In classroom settings, one way to introduce this technique is to have many low-stakes quizzes. These quizzes aren’t based on assessing one’s performance. Instead, these quizzes are designed to have learners engage with the content and to generate the learned information themselves.

                      Research shows that this method is an effective learning technique.[1] It allows students to improve their understanding and recall and promotes the “transfer” of knowledge to other settings.

                      2. Type of Mental Doing

                      Another approach is one that Psychologist Rich Mayer put together. According to him, learning is a generative activity.[2] His knowledge and the research done in his lab at Santa Barbara have repeatedly shown that we gain expertise by doing an action, but the action is based on what we already know.

                      For example, say you want to learn more about the Soviet dictator Stalin. All you need to do is link what you do know—that Stalin was a dictator—and link it to what you want to learn and retain. Stalin grew up in Georgia, killed millions of people, centralized power in Russia, and assisted in the victory of World War 2. This technique even applies to the most simple of memory tasks as our brain learns and relearns.

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                      3. Other Mental Activities

                      The final method I’ll share with you is taking the literal approach—getting out there and getting your hands dirty so to speak. But how you go about that is up to you. You could try reading an article and then going out and applying it immediately—like you could with this article. Or maybe you could find further engagement through puzzles or making a game out of the activity that you’re doing.

                      For example, if you wanted to learn about animal behavior patterns, you can read about them, go out to watch animals, and see if they perform the specific behaviors that you read about.

                      Final Thoughts

                      Learning by doing encourages active engagement with available materials and forces you to work harder to remember the material. It’s an effective technique because it helps ingrain knowledge into your memory. After all, you have a deeper personal connection to that knowledge, and you’ll be more motivated to use it in the future.

                      With that in mind, I encourage you to take what you’ve learned from reading this article and apply that in the real world. It’s only going to benefit you as you grow.

                      Featured photo credit: Van Tay Media via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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