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Learn Coding For Free With These 10 Sites

Learn Coding For Free With These 10 Sites

Programming, or coding, is a vital skill that many people are learning today. With the expansion of technology and the increasing demand of developers, learning to code could prove to be invaluable. Not only is it a highly sought-after skill by companies worldwide, it is also one that you can easily learn for free. There are sites that will allow you to learn plenty of programming languages without any charge and at your own pace.

For those who are looking to learn how to code, here are ten sites that will be more than happy to teach you:

1. Coursera

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    Coursera is a platform that offers college-level classes to members for no charge (certificate earning courses non-withstanding). While they have a vast array of courses available in different subjects, languages, and professions, they do have quite a library of classes that are all about learning to code. You can create a free account with them, pick out classes based on start dates, and go forth at your own pace. For those who are looking to learn at their own pace and on their own time, Coursera is a great option and has classes that are open almost constantly.

    2. Github

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      Github is like a reference book for coders. Indeed, it is a near hive-mind of books referencing programming as well as an incredible amount of posts from users — displaying their own programming endeavours, along with lessons and questions. In fact, if you are a professional programmer, many industry professionals will recommend making a Github profile to show off some of your own work. Users are free to browse it at their leisure and interact with the dedicated community, post questions, and learn as they go.  It is a well-rounded and invaluable resource when it comes to learning to code.

      3. CodeAcademy

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        Of course, no list on this subject would be complete without the inclusion of CodeAcademy. The extremely simple and interactive site hosts more than 24 million people learning to code for free and also offers plenty of languages to learn, including CSS, Javascript, PHP, HTML, and many others. This site has earned its popularity for a reason – it has been proven effective and is quite fun to use as well. You go through each lesson step-by-step and CodeAcademy keeps records of your progress. All in all, this is one of the easiest sites to use and has plenty of options for those who are looking to learn how to seriously code.

        4. Udemy

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          Udemy is an online learning platform that was setup originally for professionals looking to learn or improve their job skills. While some courses do indeed have to be paid for, they also offer plenty of free programming lessons via videos. Udemy is directed towards learning to code in a business environment, but it does have courses that are well designed and the videos are simple to follow along with. For those who are looking to go into business for themselves or are seeking a way to improve their job skills, Udemy is a great platform and always has lots in the way of choices.

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          5. MIT Open Courseware

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            MIT, aka the school for tech geniuses, actually offers free versions of its courses online for those looking to learn. Again, like Coursera, they come in a multitude of different areas of study and topics, but seeing as it is MIT, the focus on technology and coding is quite strong. All of the courses come with lecture notes, videos, and plenty of extra resources so that those looking to learn can get the gist of everything going on. They even have homework to help those who prefer to learn in the more traditional school style. Naturally, the quality is top notch.

            6. edX

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              edX is, funnily enough, a platform developed by Harvard University and MIT as of 2012 – talk about quality! In fact, the Introduction to Computer Science course from Harvard University that is available is one that new coders should not miss. With just two starting schools in 2012, EdX now includes sixty-plus schools and offers cutting-edge courses on technology. Once again, for those who enjoy a more traditional schooling sense, edX is something to look into.

              7. Khan Academy

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                One of the originals in online-learning offerings, Khan Academy focuses heavily on technology, math, and computer science – all for free! The lessons come in the way of step-by-step tutorial videos and have been proven highly effective with the million-or-so users that visit Khan Academy regularly. Like the other sites, you have your choice of programming languages, but the platform itself is exceptionally open and easy to navigate.

                8. Code Avengers

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                  All of this is starting to sound a bit too much like work, isn’t it? How about a site that teaches you to code for free with a more fun and personable approach? New Zealand-based company Code Avengers is all about interactivity, as it aims to teach users how to code games, apps, and websites with various languages. The time sink for each course is about twelve hours and they are available in multiple languages. Even if twelve hours sounds like a lot, compare it to a four-year school and then factor in the cost — yeah, exactly.

                  9. Free Code Camp

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                    If you want to have fun AND do something good for humanity (not counting just yourself), then Free Code Camp is for you. The community of professionals and students work together on helping hone their coding skills to the goal of building apps for free. Where does the feel-good altruism come in? Your code is available to nonprofits. How is that for an incentive?

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                    10. Hack.pledge

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                      Interestingly enough, this site is a community of developers who are dedicated to helping those who want to learn how to code. What’s even more interesting is that the teachers are some of the most high profile coders in the world, such as Bram Cohen — the inventor of BitTorrent. Where better to learn than from the masters?

                      No matter which site you select, they all offer the experience and knowledge for those interested in learning to learn how to code at no cost. If you’ve been making any excuses, they’ve just gone out the window. Get coding and have fun with it!

                      Featured photo credit: hackny via flickr.com

                      More by this author

                      Learn to code Learn Coding For Free With These 10 Sites 4 Ways to Send a Money Transfer Online INDX.guru 8 Powerful Hidden Features in Stock Market Apps You’ve Probably Missed 4 Apps To Turn You Into A Stock Market Pro (You Should Use) “I would be so successful if someone just gave me a shot”, you might think. Why not be the one to give youreself a shot? Many people out there have mindsets and attitudes that set them up for failure. They might answer my question with, “That's a crazy idea!” or “I've already tried that!” but how much of that is just making excuses? When it comes to limiting your own success, there are ten particular mindsets that turn those answers into self-fulfilling prophecy: 1. Loafing You'll write that novel just as soon as you're done with your favorite show. Oh, but now you're hungry. You'll get started after a snack. Oh, but now that snack has made you sleepy – a little nap couldn't hurt, right? One of the hardest parts, and the most obvious, of achieving success is the actual work. Procrastinating, making excuses or tricking yourself into loafing is just going to cement the fact that nothing will ever get done. It might not sound pretty, or even too easy, but the easiest way to get to success is to just jump in and get going (which is exactly how I got started). 2. Blaming It's not your fault you're not successful – the industry is bad, you don't have the money, etc, etc. When it comes down to it, however, who is the one responsible for your success? You. This is the day and age where people are launching successful start-ups in a few months, getting published online and finding their way to success one way or another. Some things might be out of your control, but blaming others is just going to waste the energy and time you need to get going. 3. Sour-grapes Being envious of the success of others is almost as bad as blaming them. All the time and energy you could be putting into your own goals is going towards a person who more than likely has done nothing but show you that the goal is attainable. You don't have to be applauding their success, but being envious and sour about it is a waste of time – let it roll off your shoulders and dig down towards accomplishing your own goals. 4. Minimizing others success Again, you don't have to be cheering and raving about the success of others, but minimizing their accomplishments looks bad on you and on your own goals. If you attained success, would you want others rolling their eyes and treating it like it is not a big deal in the slightest? I highly doubt it. “So they climbed Mount Everest, big whoop. Plenty of people have done it before”. Have you? 5. Talking You're going to do this, you're going to do that – the proof is in the pudding, ultimately. Talking about your goals and what you're going to accomplish is all well and good, but talking time is better spent actually doing. Talking about your goals has actually been shown to make you less likely to reach them, so zip up those chattering lips and dive in. 6. Making assumptions You know what they say about the word ‘assume’, it makes (a word I’ll leave out of this article) out of ‘u’ and ‘me’ . Unsuccessful people are the best at making assumptions without considering other outlets or opportunities. Missed chance after missed chance can put anyone behind or completely ruin something that you poured a lot of hard work into. People are often surprised at what happens if they take a chance instead of listening to that little pessimist inside their heads. ‘Never assume’ is good advice and it is a mindset you should get out of as quickly as possible. 7. Procrastinating This one is obvious, isn't it? It's about the same as loafing, but even worse because it applies to multiple areas of our lives. That big project? Eh, its not due for a week. My dreams? Eh, I'm going to be taking a class to learn how to write in a few months, I can relax until then. Procrastinating isn't the friend of successful people. Many of them had to learn how to either make procrastination work for them or to barrel through it and press on, even with the proverbial sloth demanding you park it on the couch. 8. Naysaying “It will never work. It is impossible, I just can't ...”. That is about when it is time to take a good look at yourself. There are a plethora of people out there that once thought the same thing: you can't get a man into space, you can't find a way for a human to fly, you can't cure a disease. Well, people did what was once considered impossible. If they can defy the entire world, why can't you defy your internal pessimist and get there? Don't tell yourself that it is impossible. In the world we live in today, it seems like impossible is becoming a word that gets weaker every day, and the same is true of your goals. 9. Consuming Fast food, energy drinks, trash TV – your brain is sobbing at the thought. With all the time spent taking in things that are not good for your brain or body, how can anyone expect it to happily balance out and produce the stuff you need to achieve success? Your output should be greater than your input; though you don't have to take the starving artist spiel literally. The point is, your production is where the value is, not the absorption. 10. Quitting “Well, I tried.” Sure, you tried once. That horse is shaking its head and trotting off to find someone who will get back on it. There's nothing necessarily wrong with cutting your losses sometimes. After all, no experience is ever truly wasted, but quitting is the top enemy to successful people. If you believe in something, if you want to find that success, there is no road map. You may very well have to carve your own path through treacherous jungle. If you give up the first time a mosquito bites you then you've doomed yourself already. Success, in large part, is about the human being in the arena. People cheer for them, their struggle and victory, but the person who watches idly and scoffs, having never tried has also never really lived. Mindsets are not set in stone. It is never too late to get started and change your perspective. After all, achieving success is completely up to you – you are the one making excuses and holding yourself back. You are also the one that will decide when it is time to stand up and get back into that arena. 10 Bad Habits That Stop People From Achieving Success

                      Trending in Learning

                      1 9 Remote Learning Tips for Efficient and Effective Learning 2 How Online Learning Enhances Your Professional Skills 3 17 Best Learning Apps to Help You Learn Faster and Better 4 Top 12 Active Learning Strategies for Busy People to Try 5 How to Use Visual Learning to Work More Effectively

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                      Last Updated on January 27, 2021

                      9 Remote Learning Tips for Efficient and Effective Learning

                      9 Remote Learning Tips for Efficient and Effective Learning

                      If you’re taking a course or working on a degree at the moment, chances are that you have to take most of your courses from home instead of at a physical location. This is called remote learning and brings with it some unique challenges.

                      How do you learn efficiently when learning remotely? How can you absorb the material and learn at an accelerated rate, and most importantly, find enjoyment in it and keep up the motivation? We’ll talk about all of this and more here.

                      What Is Remote Learning?

                      It’s easy to confuse remote learning with online learning. Before we continue, it’s important to define what remote learning is and how it differs from online learning.

                      The main difference that I want to point out is this: Remote learning is when the classes or courses have been designed to be taught in-person but are being conducted in an online environment. This kind of distance learning usually happens, for example, during a pandemic.

                      Online learning, on the other hand, is when the classes have been specifically designed to be taken online instead of in a traditional classroom environment. Courses taken on Udemy or EdX are examples of online learning.

                      Preparing Your Environment for Efficient Learning

                      Before we get into some of the more advanced accelerated learning techniques, we need to cover some basics first. Without these fundamentals in place, it might be difficult to effectively apply the accelerated learning techniques that I will share with you later.

                      1. Have a Dedicated Learning Space

                      For efficient learning, focus is everything. Having a dedicated learning space that is set up in a way that makes you feel comfortable is a great help for your focus.

                      A lot of people find that this helps, mainly for two reasons:

                      1. Since you associate that space with learning, you will be less distracted and find it easier to get into the correct mental headspace that is conducive for efficient learning.
                      2. If you have a nice space with a good vibe, you are more likely to associate learning as something you enjoy.

                      2. Get Rid of Distractions

                      Once you have set up your dedicated learning environment, get rid of all distractions. Distractions include everything from people, TV, the radio, other open tabs on your computer, and most definitely your phone.

                      We are all different, and we get distracted by different things. Therefore, knowing which distractions you have to get rid of is about knowing yourself and being honest about what distracts you personally.

                      3. Have a Dedicated Learning Time

                      If learning or studying isn’t your favorite activity, then scheduling in a set time every day as your dedicated learning time is a great aid. Apart from the obvious benefits of the structure you get, it has an amazingly helpful side-effect: It requires less effort to get started.

                      When you have promised yourself to abide by a strict time to go over your notes and revise, you don’t have a choice when that time comes. If it’s entirely up to you to choose when to study, you might sometimes put it off completely.

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                      As a result, you won’t establish the habit of getting started, and a habit is your greatest ally. Why? Because a habit has the extraordinary ability to make difficult things easy.

                      In his amazing book, Essentialism, Greg McKeown says:

                      “Learning essential new skills is never easy. But once we master them and make them automatic we have won an enormous victory, because the skill remains with us for the rest of our lives. The same is true with routines.”

                      Priming Your Brain for Efficient Learning

                      What you do before a remote learning session can be just as important as what you do during it. If you’re not in a mental state where your brain absorbs new information with ease, half of your learning session might be wasted.

                      In this next section, I am going to give you 3 tips on how to get into the right mental headspace so that you can access states of laser-sharp focus and absorb the material with ease.

                      1. Look Forward to Your Learning Session

                      Jim Kwik, a world-renowned expert on learning and memory, says that learning is “state-dependent.” This means that the mood you’re in affects how efficiently you’re learning.[1]

                      Here is how memory works, according to Joshua Foer, the author of the brilliant book Moonwalking with Einstein:

                      You remember things by what you associate with them. If you’re on holiday or you’re having an amazing experience at an event, you are likely to remember this event because it had such a profound impact on your emotions. As a result, it’s very likely that you will remember a lot of what was said at that event. This is because you connect what has been said to how you felt emotionally during the event.

                      Humans are incredibly emotionally driven creatures. The way we learn and memorize things is also profoundly impacted by our emotional state.

                      If you struggle with looking forward to your learning session, try to realize what a great thing learning is. For many adults, learning is the most fun thing that will happen to you today. It’s a break from work and all obligations. It’s about upgrading yourself—it’s your time.

                      Now, I’m going to give you a simple but effective tool that will hack your brain into looking forward to the learning session. This will get you into an excited and positive state of mind—the best state for learning at an accelerated rate and to soak up knowledge like a dry sponge.

                      2. Segment Intending

                      Founder of Mindvalley, Vishen Lakhiani, has developed a great mental tool called segment intending that sets your day up for success. It’s the perfect tool if you struggle with staying positive about your remote learning experience.

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                      The best part is that it takes only 1-2 minutes and is easy to do. You can do this in the shower or while you’re preparing your coffee in the morning.

                      Here is how it works:

                      In your head, go through the course of your day, and split it into segments. The first segment might be your morning routine before going to work. The next one might be your commute to work, then the hours where you are at work. The last segments might be the time right after work, dinner time, then your evening activities, and the last one should be when you go to sleep.[2]

                      For each of these segments, imagine that they are going remarkably well. Imagine that you’re having a stress-free commute to work. Imagine that you’re having an extraordinarily productive workday while having fun with your colleagues. When you get to the segment including your study session, imagine that it will be really exciting learning something new.

                      It’s called segment intending because you split the day into segments and produce good intentions for each segment.

                      3. The Reset Technique

                      Let’s say you have had a long, stressful day. When you get home, you are supposed to study for two hours through remote learning. How on earth are you meant to focus completely on your learning when the events that happened previously that day are gnawing away at your mind?

                      By using the Reset Technique, of course!

                      The Reset Technique removes emotional baggage from your mind. It “resets” your mind so that you can carry on with what you’re supposed to do with a clear mind free of all distractions. This will enable you to focus 100% on the task at hand.

                      I call it the Reset Technique because it pretty much works the same for you as a reset or restart button does for your internet router or computer.

                      Here is how it works:

                      Sit down on the chair by your study desk, and close your eyes. Take a deep breath and count slowly down from ten to zero. Feel yourself getting calmer as you approach zero, and when you reach zero, your mind is in a relaxed state. For the next 2 minutes, just breathe in and out slowly and deeply, and focus your attention on nothing else but the fact that you’re breathing in and out.

                      When you open your eyes, you’ll have just done a quick reset of your whole “system.” Now, you can approach your learning session with a much less distracted mind.

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                      I first heard about a similar technique from author and high-performance coach Brendon Burchard in an interview. He just called it “a quick 2-3 minute meditation” (which is exactly what it is) and proposed it as a way of not carrying emotional baggage from one part of your day into the next.[3]

                      Accelerated Learning Techniques for Remote Learning

                      So far, we have talked about how to prepare yourself and the environment around you to maximize your learning efficiency. Now it’s time to focus on the actual learning session.

                      This is where the magic happens.

                      1. Note-Taking

                      Note-taking is incredibly important if you want to learn fast and efficiently. It sounds obvious, but few people know how to actually use their notes after they have taken them.

                      If you’re watching a lecture on your computer screen, take a quick note of everything that sounds like it might be important. Right after the lecture, while the information is fresh in your head, go through your notes and collect all your key points on a single sheet of paper.

                      The reason why this helps is that having an overview of the whole topic makes it easy to understand the big picture of the subject you’re learning. Having all the key points neatly on a single page makes you feel less overwhelmed. If all the key points can get space on one page, you feel confident that you can learn it easily.

                      If your teacher has already provided you with a list of key points, it might be tempting to think that this relieves you of the obligation to make notes yourself, but it’s important that you make your own notes with your own words. The reason why this is so important will become evident when I tell you about the Feynman Technique, which is my next tip.

                      Learn to make note-taking your habit during remote learning: Why Successful People Take Notes And How to Make It Your Habit

                      2. The Feynman Technique

                      “If you can’t explain it to a six-year-old, you don’t understand it yourself.” –Albert Einstein

                      What Einstein said above is what the Feynman technique is all about. This is a learning technique that Nobel prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman developed and used himself.

                      Using the Feynman Technique is easy:

                      Pretend that you are explaining a concept that you’re learning to a child. You can either write it down or say it out loud. Identify the parts of your explanation that you’re struggling with communicating clearly, and take note of gaps in your understanding of the concept.

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                      Then, read up on the concept again and try to simplify the explanation one more time. Repeat this until you can confidently explain the concept in simple terms.

                      Why is the Feynman Technique so effective? Shane Parrish from Farnam Street puts it well:

                      “Sometimes we use jargon and complicated language to hide what we don’t understand. The Feynman Technique lays bare the true extent of our knowledge.”[4]

                      To explain something in your own words, you are forced to really think about it. This is exactly why teaching is one of the best learning techniques, even in remote learning. If you want to learn something really well, teach it to somebody.

                      3. Spaced Repetition

                      Spaced repetition is the single most effective technique for solidifying something in your long term memory.

                      Spaced repetition is a memorization technique based on progressively increasing the time between each time you review the material you are learning. Repetition is essential if you expect to remember something long term, and spaced repetition is one of the most successful structured repetition systems for this purpose.

                      Spaced repetition has been tested by psychologists and has proven to be more successful than repeating previously learned material at random intervals. This is because you take advantage of your brain’s psychological spacing effect, which involves reviewing the material at the point when you are about to forget it.[5]

                      This technique stems from the work of the psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus. He developed something we call the forgetting curve. This is a graph that shows that each time we actively recall the same information, it takes longer for it to decay from our memory[6].

                      Ebbinghaus' forgetting curve and review cycle.

                        In my opinion, the best way to start taking advantage of spaced repetition is with an app such as Anki. This app will automatically space out the time intervals for you, based on how well you remember the information you are reviewing.

                        Learn more about spaced repetition here: How to Use Spaced Repetition to Remember What You’ve Learned

                        Summing Up

                        Once you set up your environment, prime yourself for learning, and use accelerated learning techniques, you’re ready to get moving with remote learning.

                        Now it’s up to you to take action and apply the tips and techniques we went through above. Remember, the hardest part of doing something hard is starting it. Once you’ve done that, you’ll be on a better path to learning and growing.

                        More Tips on Learning Efficiently

                        Featured photo credit: Windows via unsplash.com

                        Reference

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