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Get Well-Prepared For Giving Birth: Finding A Suitable Child Birth Class

Get Well-Prepared For Giving Birth: Finding A Suitable Child Birth Class

If you’re expecting your first child, it’s normal to feel overwhelmed by doubts and fears.

For this reason, you can choose to attend childbirth education classes, which are the best way to prepare for labor and delivery. Depending on where you go, classes range from an intensive workshops which usually last one day or one weekend, to weekly sessions lasting one to two months.

Usually a childbirth class covers several kinds of seminars, discussions and pain management and breathing techniques, all led by a trained instructor. Unfortunately, labour is not always completely perfect, so a childbirth course also covers the most common labor and delivery issues – for example situations in which c-section is the best option – and their resolutions.

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Giving Birth

    How To Find The Right Childbirth Classes

    The best ways to look for good childbirth classes are asking your family doctor, asking people you trust who already gave birth or searching carefully on the internet. On the internet you can find both hospital websites and private certified instructors websites.

    You will also find several types of classes – each with the possibility of being the most suitable for you

    Lamaze Technique

    The main goal of this method is to “increase women’s confidence in their ability to give birth” according to Lamaze International.

    In fact Lamaze technique helps simplify the birth process with a natural approach that helps alleviate fears and manage pain, and during its classes mothers are meticulously informed about their options so that they are able to making decisions for their own labor and delivery.

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    The focus of this method is on building your confidence or talking about how to keep your baby’s birth safe and as simple as possible.

    The Bradley Method

    The Bradley Method consists of a 12 weeks course and it is also called “husband-coached birth”. It is mainly focused on practice and includes both physical and psychological training.

    In fact, according to Bradley Method official website, “students learn 10% of what they hear, 20% of what they see, 50% of what they read and 90 % of what they do.” The goal of this method is to prepare the mother to deliver without pain medications and the baby’s father to be mom’s birth coach.

    Participant couples are usually 3 to 6 so that instructors can get to know better each of them delivering a personalized service that meets their needs. Plus, keeping classes small is the best way to let each participant do plenty of practice.

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    Alexander Technique

    “The Alexander technique is a way of learning how you can get rid of harmful tension in your body.”

    This technique can be used by anyone and it’s meant to improve your ease and freedom of movement, flexibility and balance. The benefits of taking weekly lessons while pregnant are many:

    • Improve comfort during pregnancy
    • Learn how to avoid lower backache, and carry out their everyday activities with as much efficiency as possible
    • Increase pushing effectiveness during delivery
    • Aid in recovery after giving birth

    HypnoBirthing

    HypnoBirthing is a relaxed approach enhanced by self-hypnosis techniques to give birth in a totally relaxed state of mind and body. Classes are presented in a format of five 2 and a half hour classes and HypnoBirthing teachers train participant to have an easier, more comfortable, and safer birthing.

    The course covers several subjects such as how to prepare the body for giving birth, rapid and instant self-relaxation techniques, breathing techniques for labor and delivery and positions for descent and birthing.

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    Giving Birth

      Childbirth Classes Before Giving Birth: What You Will Learn

      To be pregnant is to be vitally alive, thoroughly woman, and undoubtedly inhabited.
      – Anne Buchanan & Debra Klingsporn

      Whether you take Lamaze, Bradley or Alexander classes, you’re a first-time mom or a delivery room veteran, you can learn a lot from childbirth classes. First of all you can get to know your body better than ever before, then you will learn and understand the labour and delivery processes, you will prepare your body for a gentle delivery with the practice of several techniques, and most importantly, you will build your confidence in your body’s ability to give birth.

      Whether your pregnancy was meticulously planned, medically coaxed, or happened by surprise, one thing is certain – your life will never be the same.
      – Catherine Jones

      Featured photo credit: Felipe Fernandes via flickr.com

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      Published on May 21, 2021

      Bedtimes For Kids At Different Ages (Your Go-To Guide)

      Bedtimes For Kids At Different Ages (Your Go-To Guide)

      Bedtimes for kids might be one of the most challenging parts of the day. Parents are tired and ready to relax, while kids of all ages seem to find extra energy and want nothing to do with sleep. One more story, one more trip to the bathroom, and one more question quickly make for a late-night, and no one gets the rest they need.

      If this happens often, you might start wondering if you and your child are getting the proper amount of sleep and how to make bedtime easier. Why is it so crucial for your child to get enough sleep? What does sleep deprivation look like? How do you improve bedtimes for kids?

      How Sleep Impacts Your Child’s Health

      Whether young or old, sleep is a vital part of staying healthy. There are many benefits to getting the right amount of sleep while not getting enough can have negative consequences. How does it impact your child?[1]

      • Brain Function – Sleep is linked to certain brain functions such as concentration, productivity, and cognition. These all impact a child’s behavior and academic success.
      • Weight – Sleep patterns affect the hormones responsible for appetite. A lack of sleep interferes with the ability to regulate food intake, making overeating more likely.
      • Physical Performance – Sleep impacts a person’s physical abilities. Proper rest means better performance, concentration, energy, mental clarity, and faster speed.
      • Physical Health – There are many ways sleep promotes health. Sleep heals the body but also helps prevent disease and health issues. Getting proper rest will regulate blood pressure, help prevent heart disease, reduce chances of sleep apnea, reduce inflammation, boost immune system, and lower risk of weight gain.
      • Improve Mental Health – A lack of sleep has a negative impact on mood and social and emotional intelligence. A child not getting proper sleep is more likely to experience depression, lack empathy and be unaware of other people’s emotions and reactions.

      Sleep, Risky Behavior, and Teens

      Studies found that teens were more likely to engage in risky behavior when they are sleep-deprived. They’ll have problems regulating their mood, making them more short-tempered, aggressive, and impulsive. Their inability to self-regulate can even look like the symptoms of ADHD.[2]

      Sleep deprivation becomes hazardous when teens are driving. The impulsiveness and risk-taking, along with exhaustion, put them at a higher risk for accidents. In fact, driving tired is comparable to driving with a blood alcohol content of .08.[3]

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      You can see why sleep is so essential to everyone’s health, but how much is needed? What do pediatricians recommend? Is it the same for all ages?

      Sleep Recommendations From Pediatricians

      Sleep requirements vary by age. It won’t be the same for every individual. Some people find that they need more sleep than others.

      Here is a basic guideline of what pediatricians now recommend:[4]

      • Ages 4-12 months: 12-16 hours (including naps)
      • Ages 1-2 years: 11-14 hours (including naps)
      • Ages 3-5 years: 10-13 hours (including naps)
      • Age 6-12 years: 9-12 hours
      • Age 13-18 years: 8-10 hours

      Increase the amount of sleep if your child isn’t thriving on the recommended amount.

      Signs Your Child Isn’t Getting Enough Sleep

      There are ways to tell if your child is getting adequate sleep beyond the usual grumpiness. Here are specific things to watch out for:[5]

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      • Excessive sleepiness during the day
      • Difficulty waking up on time
      • Hyperactivity
      • Depression
      • Inattention
      • Mood swings
      • Aggressive behavior
      • Irritability
      • Impatience
      • Impulse control

      As you can see, prolonged lack of sleep can cause relational problems and hinder your child’s ability to do well in school. What can you do if you realize your child is not getting enough sleep? How can you improve bedtimes for your kids?

      How to Set Up a Bedtime Routine

      Sleep hygiene or a bedtime schedule will help your child fall asleep faster. It will also improve the quality of sleep. You will need to adjust to what works for your family, but the following suggestions can help everyone have a more pleasant bedtime.

      For Babies

      Most people think they have to let their baby “cry it out” at bedtime. However, there are ways you can teach a baby to sleep without tears, making the experience more pleasant for everyone. In fact, studies show the faded bedtime method—or gentle sleep training—is just as effective as leaving a baby to cry but without the stress.[6] What is gentle sleep training?

      Gentle Sleep Training

      This method eases babies and young children into falling asleep on their own. There are two ways to do this:

      1. Positive Routines With Faded Bedtime

      Kids learn to fall asleep easily by using comforting, quiet, and predictable rituals, up to twenty minutes long. The key is to choose a bedtime that’s not too early. A child that isn’t tired will only fight sleep.

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      Start the process when your baby or child is sleepy, even if it’s later than you’d prefer. You’ll notice a pattern and quickly discover the time they naturally start winding down. Make this their bedtime for now. They will learn to associate sleep with the routine, and you’ll be able to start fifteen to twenty minutes earlier to slowly adjust their schedule.

      2. Sleep With Parental Presence

      With this method, you lie down with your baby or child until they fall asleep. Over time, you pay less attention to your child, gradually sitting up, then sitting in a chair. Eventually, your child will be able to sleep without you. A study showed that using this method helped infants sleep longer and wake up less.[7]

      Both of these ways take time but are effective and less traumatic than leaving an infant or young child to cry.

      More Tips to Help Your Baby Sleep Better

      You want to build a routine, but how? What are practical things you can do to help your baby get ready for bed?

      Here are tips for a soothing and calm bedtime:[8]

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      • Help set their “internal clock” by exposing them to natural daylight, daytime activities, and the calmness of evening.
      • Block blue light exposure.
      • Make the hour up to bedtime calm, peaceful, and pleasant.
      • Learn how to keep stress minimal for you and your baby.
      • Don’t force sleep. It will increase anxiety and make rest more difficult.
      • Avoid late afternoon naps
      • Prolong the time between nap and bedtime.
      • Feed baby right before bed.
      • Avoid intervening too soon if the baby starts to wake up. Give your child a chance to fall back asleep without your help.

      For Elementary-Aged Children

      It’s easier to follow a routine if you start young, but it’s never too late to begin. The good news is it only takes a few nights to notice an improvement in your child’s sleep.

      These ideas will help you set up a schedule that will encourage your child to fall asleep easier, faster, and for a more extended period.[9]

      • Offer them a nutritious snack.
      • Bathe them.
      • Brush their teeth and go to the bathroom.
      • Read them a story.
      • Sing them a song.
      • Cuddle or massage them.
      • Talk about the day.

      For best results, choose a handful of activities and do them in the same order each night. Dim the lights and keep activity minimal to help everyone slow down.

      For Teens

      They might fight the idea of getting more sleep, but teens will benefit from a routine, too. They’re usually capable of overseeing their bedtime, but a little structure and oversight can help them get the sleep they need. By implementing the following tips, your teen can get better rest.[10]

      • Avoid caffeine in the evening.
      • Limit screen time.
      • Avoid late-night binging.
      • Exercise, ideally sixty minutes a day.
      • Keep the bedroom dark, cool, and quiet.
      • Talk through problems.

      Quality Sleep for a Healthy Life

      Bedtimes for kids can be an enjoyable part of the day with proper sleep hygiene in place. Not only can it be quality time with your child, but it can also set them on the road to good health and high performance. By implementing these tips, you can ensure proper rest for the whole family and better bedtimes for kids.

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      Featured photo credit: Igordoon Primus via unsplash.com

      Reference

      [1] Medical News Today: Why Sleep Is Essential For Health
      [2] Child Mind Institute: Teens And Sleep: The Cost Of Sleep Deprivation
      [3] Depart of Health: Drowsy Driving Prevention, Teens Ages 16 To 19
      [4] AAP publications: AAP Endorses New Recommendations On Sleep Times
      [5] Journal of Excellence in Nursing Leadership: Sleep Deprivation In Children A Growing Public Health Concern
      [6] Parenting Science: Gentle Infant Sleep Training
      [7] BetterHealth: Solutions to sleep concerns (11) – babies 6 to 12 months
      [8] Parenting Science: 15 Evidence-Based Baby Sleep Tips
      [9] Sleep Foundation: Bedtime Routines For Children
      [10] NHS: Sleep Tips For Teenagers

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