Advertising
Advertising

5 Self-Limiting Beliefs That Stop You From Building Wealth

5 Self-Limiting Beliefs That Stop You From Building Wealth

We all have dreams of being a billionaire – the good life, financial independence, a huge mansion, or maybe even a small island. Yet, every time we think of that fantasy we treat it as just that –  a fantasy. Fantasies tend to carry with them this stigma that they “could never happen.” Because of this stigma our dreams remain fantasies and not realities. So, I’d like to ask you why they couldn’t be a reality?

“I’m no stock broker or tech startup genius,” you might say. “I wouldn’t know where to begin!” Well, the first place to begin is to stop making excuses.

Advertising

1. “It’s too late to get started!”

Is it? People used to say the same thing about going to school, but you are likely to see teenagers going to college just as much as you are senior citizens these days. The same is true when it comes to achieving your financial goals. With the rise of technology, researching and learning your way around stocks (as I did with INDX.guru at the age of 31!), investing, saving, and earning more money has never been more accessible.

No matter your age, you can always put in a little time to research how people have gained financial independence, and became millionaires at varying ages. Timothy Sykes made his fortune through penny-stocks and by teaching others to utilize the same resources. Starting out as a philosophy major, he learned about penny-stocks and his life took an entirely different turn. Nothing is set in stone. No matter your age, major, or place in life, it is never too late to learn.

Advertising

2. “This isn’t the same financial wisdom that everyone else has taught me!”

No, it sure isn’t, and there’s a good reason why. With the IRA and 401k programs losing over a trillion dollars in the last few years, it might be worth it to ask, “Have I been taught wrong?” Unfortunately, that may very well be the case. Expecting financial secrets to stay the same for decades is like expecting people to still be using beepers in massive quantities in 2015. The tried and true methods either need to change with the times or undergo something called second-order change. This change typically refers to a company or management reshuffle when the old ways aren’t working.

It is change born out of necessity. As time carries on, nothing is every really safe from change. Improving on those old methods is something to start with, but the tried and true just isn’t working any more. It’s time to go back to the drawing-board.

Advertising

3. “I’m not smart enough to get to millionaire status!”

Believe it or not, being a genius programmer, a celebrity, or an inventor isn’t necessary to achieve alchemist gold. It also isn’t necessary to be a stock genius or investing master to get into investing or stocks. A little research can go miles for every interest or hobby. The mentality of being too out of the know to reach a goal is a self-defeating mentality, no matter which way it’s looked at. The truth is, there are plenty of ways out there to climb the proverbial ladder. The internet has opened up the world to learning essentially anything that they please without having to take years of university for tens of thousands of dollars (seems a bit counter-intuitive anyways, right?).

If you have no idea where to begin, look up some key phrases like: “beginner tips to investing and stocks” or “financial independence”. Mint.com is a fantastic resource as well, helping you keep track of your finances. In essence, there are plenty of places to get started. You just have to take that first step.

Advertising

4. “I wasn’t born with a silver spoon in my mouth!”

Well, a lot of people aren’t. That doesn’t mean that they can’t climb their way to the top. In fact, has there ever been a movie where a rich person has gotten even richer and has been the protagonist? Probably. The point is, there are more movies out there about the underdog finding their way to riches than Hollywood can produce at a given time. Find a way to turn your interests, hobbies, and talents into something that can get you closer to the financial plateau. Good old Mark Zuckerberg is a famous case. This Facebook founder even has a movie about how he climbed up from basically nothing to become one of the most wealthiest people recognized worldwide. A fairy tale doesn’t happen outside of a story book, folks. You have to make your own dreams come true!

5. “I wouldn’t even know where to start!”

A lot of people don’t. Here’s a little tip: look at the person you most admire, perhaps the person who got you into the idea of wanting to aspire to better financial goals. What is it that they did to get where they are now? There’s no need to go tracking down directly in their footprints – but a little inspiration is great. Even better, they are likely to have inspiration of their own and numerous other paths to other success stories for you to follow. Take their tips and tricks to heart (though with a grain of salt from some). Most of the time, that uncertainty is terrifying, but it is also just an excuse to never get started. Nothing will ever get done while the future is being stared at idly – you know it deep down already.

Conclusion

These five mindsets really can hinder you with long-term or short-term goals towards wealth. A negative mindset can hinder numerous aspects of life, really. However, the responsibility of shifting up those mindsets ultimately falls to the individual. The truth is, in most cases, you are the one holding yourself back. You don’t need to be a genius, born in splendor, or even have a direct business plan to achieve goals of wealth. You just need some research, dedication and confidence.

Featured photo credit: jacme31 via flickr.com

More by this author

4 Ways to Send a Money Transfer Online INDX.guru 8 Powerful Hidden Features in Stock Market Apps You’ve Probably Missed 4 Apps To Turn You Into A Stock Market Pro (You Should Use) “I would be so successful if someone just gave me a shot”, you might think. Why not be the one to give youreself a shot? Many people out there have mindsets and attitudes that set them up for failure. They might answer my question with, “That's a crazy idea!” or “I've already tried that!” but how much of that is just making excuses? When it comes to limiting your own success, there are ten particular mindsets that turn those answers into self-fulfilling prophecy: 1. Loafing You'll write that novel just as soon as you're done with your favorite show. Oh, but now you're hungry. You'll get started after a snack. Oh, but now that snack has made you sleepy – a little nap couldn't hurt, right? One of the hardest parts, and the most obvious, of achieving success is the actual work. Procrastinating, making excuses or tricking yourself into loafing is just going to cement the fact that nothing will ever get done. It might not sound pretty, or even too easy, but the easiest way to get to success is to just jump in and get going (which is exactly how I got started). 2. Blaming It's not your fault you're not successful – the industry is bad, you don't have the money, etc, etc. When it comes down to it, however, who is the one responsible for your success? You. This is the day and age where people are launching successful start-ups in a few months, getting published online and finding their way to success one way or another. Some things might be out of your control, but blaming others is just going to waste the energy and time you need to get going. 3. Sour-grapes Being envious of the success of others is almost as bad as blaming them. All the time and energy you could be putting into your own goals is going towards a person who more than likely has done nothing but show you that the goal is attainable. You don't have to be applauding their success, but being envious and sour about it is a waste of time – let it roll off your shoulders and dig down towards accomplishing your own goals. 4. Minimizing others success Again, you don't have to be cheering and raving about the success of others, but minimizing their accomplishments looks bad on you and on your own goals. If you attained success, would you want others rolling their eyes and treating it like it is not a big deal in the slightest? I highly doubt it. “So they climbed Mount Everest, big whoop. Plenty of people have done it before”. Have you? 5. Talking You're going to do this, you're going to do that – the proof is in the pudding, ultimately. Talking about your goals and what you're going to accomplish is all well and good, but talking time is better spent actually doing. Talking about your goals has actually been shown to make you less likely to reach them, so zip up those chattering lips and dive in. 6. Making assumptions You know what they say about the word ‘assume’, it makes (a word I’ll leave out of this article) out of ‘u’ and ‘me’ . Unsuccessful people are the best at making assumptions without considering other outlets or opportunities. Missed chance after missed chance can put anyone behind or completely ruin something that you poured a lot of hard work into. People are often surprised at what happens if they take a chance instead of listening to that little pessimist inside their heads. ‘Never assume’ is good advice and it is a mindset you should get out of as quickly as possible. 7. Procrastinating This one is obvious, isn't it? It's about the same as loafing, but even worse because it applies to multiple areas of our lives. That big project? Eh, its not due for a week. My dreams? Eh, I'm going to be taking a class to learn how to write in a few months, I can relax until then. Procrastinating isn't the friend of successful people. Many of them had to learn how to either make procrastination work for them or to barrel through it and press on, even with the proverbial sloth demanding you park it on the couch. 8. Naysaying “It will never work. It is impossible, I just can't ...”. That is about when it is time to take a good look at yourself. There are a plethora of people out there that once thought the same thing: you can't get a man into space, you can't find a way for a human to fly, you can't cure a disease. Well, people did what was once considered impossible. If they can defy the entire world, why can't you defy your internal pessimist and get there? Don't tell yourself that it is impossible. In the world we live in today, it seems like impossible is becoming a word that gets weaker every day, and the same is true of your goals. 9. Consuming Fast food, energy drinks, trash TV – your brain is sobbing at the thought. With all the time spent taking in things that are not good for your brain or body, how can anyone expect it to happily balance out and produce the stuff you need to achieve success? Your output should be greater than your input; though you don't have to take the starving artist spiel literally. The point is, your production is where the value is, not the absorption. 10. Quitting “Well, I tried.” Sure, you tried once. That horse is shaking its head and trotting off to find someone who will get back on it. There's nothing necessarily wrong with cutting your losses sometimes. After all, no experience is ever truly wasted, but quitting is the top enemy to successful people. If you believe in something, if you want to find that success, there is no road map. You may very well have to carve your own path through treacherous jungle. If you give up the first time a mosquito bites you then you've doomed yourself already. Success, in large part, is about the human being in the arena. People cheer for them, their struggle and victory, but the person who watches idly and scoffs, having never tried has also never really lived. Mindsets are not set in stone. It is never too late to get started and change your perspective. After all, achieving success is completely up to you – you are the one making excuses and holding yourself back. You are also the one that will decide when it is time to stand up and get back into that arena. 10 Bad Habits That Stop People From Achieving Success 5 Tools We Always Use Which Actually Make Us Unproductive 5 Tools We Always Use Which Actually Make Us Unproductive

Trending in Money

1 How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt 2 How to Use Debt Snowball to Get out from a Financial Avalanche 3 How Personal Finance Software Helps You Get More Out of Your Money 4 The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind 5 How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

Advertising

Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

Advertising

I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

Advertising

Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

Advertising

So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

Read Next