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Got Positivity? 5 Reasons to Be Positive Backed by Science

Got Positivity? 5 Reasons to Be Positive Backed by Science

Whatever your situation, you have the power to reshape your life and the world around you for the better. You have, within you, the ingredients to be resilient, happy, and fulfilled. These ingredients are renewable. You just need to learn how to tap into them.

If you’re like I was not long ago, you’re missing the recipe to your best possible life. If you’re like I was, you don’t know what lies within you. You search for happiness in the wrong places. You look outside yourself to money, possessions, or status for fulfillment, but still feel like something’s missing.

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What can you add to your life that will help?

Positivity! 
Positivity comes in all shapes and sizes. Positivity comes from connection and love, creativity and humor, savoring and gratitude; it’s when you feel energized by an exciting new idea or hobby, or when you look in awe at the beauty of nature. Positivity comes from positive emotions like joy, peace, and inspiration. Positivity opens your heart and your mind to the world.

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Here are just a few reasons to add more positivity to your life:

1. Positivity feels good

Notice how much better you feel by simply watching a pleasant story on the news, compared to a sad one? This may seem obvious, but many of us seek out dark and depressing things in our lives. Feeling good motivates you to change for the better and to give back. When you’re feeling down, you can’t help but be defensive and only focus on your own needs. Feeling positive is a gift to share with others.

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2. Positivity changes the workings of your mind

Positivity not only changes the quality of thoughts in your mind, but also expands the boundaries of your mind. Positivity gives you the tools to bounce back and find new options in your life. Positivity keeps your focus on your larger goals and aspirations in life. Positivity increases your patience and compassion, and helps you to forgive sooner. Positivity enables you to let go of negative thoughts and to stay connected with those your love. Positivity means no matter how busy you get, you’ll always find time to phone home or check up on someone you care about.

3. Positivity brightens your future

Our positive emotions tend to fade, but increasing our experiences of positivity over time brings out the best in us. Positivity in your life tends to compound over time- you just need to build some momentum. Positivity increases resourcefulness, optimism, and resiliency. It also improves your relationships through allowing you to form better social connections.

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4. Positivity stops negativity in its tracks

In a split second negativity can ruin your day, but positivity can bring you back to a happier mindset. Positivity is like a second chance: it can take you from being angry at yourself for being late to work, to realizing how lucky you are to be employed. Positivity means making the best out of your circumstances- it’s what it takes to be resilient.

5. Positivity increases with practice

You have more influence over how you’re feeling moment-to-moment than you’d think. Just as you have the ability to be negative, you also have the ability to be positive. Increasing your happiness is just as much about not paying as much attention to the negative as it is tending to the positive aspects of your life. Making positivity a habit is how you open yourself up to seeing new possibilities, and learn to cope with setbacks and adversity. Learning to see the positive aspects of a situation is essential to living your best life.

Conclusion

Positivity doesn’t mean burying your head in the sand. It doesn’t prevent bad things from happening, but it can, nonetheless, make a very noticeable difference in your life. Whether you seek to increase pleasure and contentment, engagement and flow, or meaning and purpose, positivity can help you find what you’re looking for.

Featured photo credit: www.flickriver.com/photos/deweggis/ via flickr.com

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Bob Dempsey

Psychology Major

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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