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10 Truths Only Art Students Would Understand

10 Truths Only Art Students Would Understand

While some college majors earn almost universal respect, others are dismissed as undemanding and insignificant. Art, for example, is considered easier than science primarily because the latter contains more contact hours and more complex subject matter. However, this argument ignores the fact that art is interpretive and lacks the clarity of science, meaning that successful students must have a greater understanding of art and more confidence in their chosen medium.

Regardless of the circumstances, it’s indisputable that art students are all familiar with the same triumphs, struggles, and unfair misconceptions. With this in mind, here are 10 truths that only an art student would truly understand.

1. You constantly fight for the honor of your degree

Considering most people underestimate the difficulty of completing an art degree, the majority of art students feel compelled to fiercely defend their major. This can translate into defensiveness and undue aggression, although either would be understandable in the face of unsubstantiated and largely unfair criticism. Art students often get drawn into heated debates about the merit of their major, especially with those who study supposedly “serious” subjects.

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2. You appreciate that art takes many forms

From an outside perspective, there is a great deal of skepticism when it comes to appraising art. So many art mediums get labeled as unskilled or unappealing, but true students of art understand the complexity associated with these methods and learn to appreciate them over time. From celebrated multimedia artists such as Tiff McGinnis to modern-day abstract painters such as Justin Adian, art can be diverse, challenging, and thrilling regardless of its form.

3. You spend your disposable income on materials and supplies

As an art student, you will face two challenging and unavoidable obstacles: First, you will have a noticeable lack of disposable income. Second, you will spend whatever is left of your money on the materials and supplies required to bring your projects to life. As a result, you will spend every available penny on your art, subsequently forcing you to make a sizable investment in your future.

4. You appreciate the value of recycling

If you’ve ever seen a cheap painting in a thrift store and thought it might be valuable, there is every chance that you were right. After all, there are a number of artists like Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia that regularly give their work away to thrift stores in a bid to earn greater exposure and reach a wider audience. This also underscores the respect that artists have for thrift marketing and recycling, and offers students the chance to source useful materials and items without spending a fortune.

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5. You learn to make the most of your time during projects

If paint is your medium of choice (or you use it to infuse color into your project), you’re used to waiting for it to dry. This waiting period can be interminable to some, but art students use this time to reflect on their work and consider ways in which their project can be improved. Once you master this, you will start to appreciate your spare time more and use these waiting periods to your advantage.

6. You are used to ruining your clothes

Most clothes are not designed to suit the demands of art projects, in particular the damage caused by chemicals, paint, and abrasive substances such as glue. Over time, you’ll probably find that a number of your outfits are ruined from studying art, and the cost of replacing these merely becomes the price you pay for indulging your creative impulses!

7. You learn to deal with criticism that is based on opinion rather than objective reasoning

Art has always been subjective, regardless of its origin or form. While this is the source of a wide diversity of work and projects, it also generates criticism that is based purely on personal opinion rather than any form of objective reasoning. Your work will often be judged from a position of ignorance rather than insight, and as you continue to study you will you come to accept this as part of your chosen path.

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8. You are forced to listen to intense critiques that last for hours

To prepare art students for harsh criticism, tutors will hold regular sessions in which they deliver an intense and detailed critique of each individual’s work. Their deliveries will often be excessive and last for hours, with many extending beyond the initially proposed time frame. You learn quite quickly to cope with criticism and to distinguish between constructive feedback and subjective opinion.

9. You soon become a critic of others’ work

While studying art earns you an appreciation of all art mediums and opens your mind to alternative genres, it also helps you form your own preferences. This means that you soon develop a critical eye when appraising others’ work and look to deliver honest and constructive feedback to the artist. This is often an emotive process too, partially because you understand that all art is personal to the creator and an intense labor of love!

10. You understand the relationship that exists between art and technology

Some argue that technology now represents an arts-based education, although this principle could easily be reversed in 2015. More specifically, it would be fair to assert that modern art is increasingly dependent on software, which is in turn creating a closely bound relationship between art and technology. You will probably be more aware of this than ever, especially given the amount of software used to create art and the burden it will place on your computer’s processor!

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Featured photo credit: Foundry / Pixabay via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on June 26, 2020

10 Things To Remember When Everything Goes Wrong

10 Things To Remember When Everything Goes Wrong

Problems and heartaches in life are inevitable. However, there are some things to remember when you’re right in the thick of it that can help you get through it. When everything seems to be going wrong, practice telling yourself these things.

1. This Too Shall Pass

Sometimes life’s rough patches feel like they’re going to last forever. Whether you’re dealing with work-related issues, family problems, or stressful situations, very few problems last for a lifetime. So remind yourself, that things won’t be this bad forever.

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2. Some Things are Going Right

When things are going wrong, it’s hard to recognize what is going right. It’s easy to screen out the good things and only focus on the bad things. Remind yourself that some things are going right. Purposely look for the positive, even if it is something very small.

3. I Have Some Control

One of the most most important things to remember is that you have some control of the situation. Even if you aren’t in complete control of the situation, one thing you can always control is your attitude and reaction. Focus on managing what is within your control.

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4. I Can Ask for Help

Asking for help can be hard sometimes. However, it’s one of the best ways to deal with tough situations. Tell people what you need specifically if they offer to help. Don’t be afraid to call on friends and family and ask them for help, whether you need financial assistance, emotional support, or practical help.

5. Much of This Won’t Matter in a Few Years

Most of the problems we worry about today won’t actually matter five years from now. Remind yourself that whatever is going wrong now is only a small percentage of your actual life. Even if you’re dealing with a major problem, like a loved one’s illness, remember that a lot of good things are likely to happen in the course of a year or two as well.

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6. I Can Handle This

A lack of confidence in handling tough times can add to stress. One of the best things to remember is that you can handle tough situations. Even though you might feel angry, hurt, disappointed, or sad, it won’t kill you. You can get through it.

7. Something Good Will Come Out of This

No matter how bad a situation is, it’s almost certain that something good will come out of it. At the very least, it’s likely that you will learn a life lesson. Perhaps you learn not to repeat the same mistake in the future or maybe you move on from a bad situation and find something better. Look for the one good thing that can result when bad things happen.

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8. I Can Accept What’s Out of my Control

There are many things that aren’t within your control. You can’t change the past, another person’s behavior, or a loved one’s health issues. Don’t waste time trying to force others to change or trying to make things be different if it isn’t within your control. Investing time and energy into trying to things you can’t will cause you to feel helpless and exhausted. Acceptance is one of the best way to establish resilience.

9. I Have Overcome Past Difficulties

One of the things to remember when you’re facing difficulties, is that you’ve handled problems in the past. Don’t overlook past difficulties that you’ve dealt with successfully. Remind yourself of all the past problems you’ve overcome and you’ll gain confidence in dealing with the current issues.

10. I Need to Take Care of Myself

When everything seems to be going wrong, take care of yourself. Get plenty of rest, get some exercise, eat healthy, and spend some time doing leisure activities. When you’re taking better care of yourself you’ll be better equipped to deal with your problems.

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Featured photo credit: NeONBRAND via unsplash.com

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