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6 Things Terrible Bosses Do That Make Their Talented Employees Quit

6 Things Terrible Bosses Do That Make Their Talented Employees Quit

According to a Gallup study, many working adults left their jobs because of a bad boss. In a study of 7,200 adults, goal setting and managing priorities were two of the most important factors for workers to be satisfied with their managers.

It can be bemusing when you listen to managers or bosses complain that their best employees are leaving. The thing is, we don’t leave our jobs – we leave our bosses. No employee wants to be in a stiff and tense environment where there is no room to achieve one’s career goals. It is important for bosses to recognize our needs and fulfill our desires. Here are some things bosses do that make us leave.

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1. They don’t trust us

We live in a world where trust is a scarce commodity, but employing someone means that you have a certain amount of belief in the person’s abilities. There is no point in always looking over your shoulder. When a boss continually questions every action or decision we make, we will become frustrated. We need the opportunity to prove our worth.

2. They don’t reward us for our good work

We are not expecting an instant promotion for making the company better and achieving a part of the company’s objectives. Yet there is nothing wrong in offering us a pat on the back. There is no one who doesn’t like a thumb up for their hard work. When we work our butts off to meet deadlines and reach goals, we should be rewarded for a job well done. We won’t leave the company if we are being rewarded for our efforts.

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3. They are dishonest

Every employee values truth and honesty. It is important for bosses to possess character. There really is no excuse for a manager to be dishonest and lie to their employees. When we catch the boss lying, it becomes difficult for us to believe in what the company stands for. We want our bosses to have integrity and solid character.

4. They are difficult

How much opportunity are we given to express our thoughts and offer our ideas? Bosses who let their employees leave could have this know-it-all persona that scares us and our wonderful ideas away. Just as much as bosses are full of great ideas, we also have great ideas of our own. Try and prompt us to be expressive rather than stifle us with authority.

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5. They overwork us

According to a study, overworking employees more than 50 hours diminishes their productivity. No employee wants to be burnt out. Rather than try to break us down with more work, appreciate and value our effort by rewarding us with a better status for our hard work. Even when we are talented and resourceful at our job, we can’t keep producing good work if we’re burnt out. Increasing our workload means the boss should also be willing to offer us a better status, a better paycheck and a better work environment. If they want to turn us into a slave without offering us more rewards, walking out the door seems to be a better deal.

6. They hire and promote the wrong people

Nothing is as awful as a talented person working under a blockhead. You can’t get the best out of a poor structural chain. To get hard working employees to stay, bosses need to learn to have the right people in the right places. They should learn to hire other talented people, who boost the efficacy of already talented employees. When the wrong people are promoted instead of let go, bosses are only creating a platform for the right and talented employees to walk away.

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Featured photo credit: http://www.compfight.com via compfight.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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