Advertising
Advertising

10 Things Successful People Do Differently Before They Leave Their Offices

10 Things Successful People Do Differently Before They Leave Their Offices

Successful people neither bury themselves in their work till the last minute nor sit back and surf the net like most of us do before leaving the offices.

Instead, they have an end-of-day routine that allows them to:

  • Remain in control of their evening
  • Get energized
  • Be accountable
  • Ensure tomorrow’s success
  • Get perspective
  • Record history
  • Stay organized
  • Not overthink or worry about the small stuff
  • Stay connected
  • And be as good at home as they are at work

Here’s how they do it:

1. They Dictate When They Will Stop Working

Super successful people know exactly when they’re leaving their office. They’re not stressed about urgent stuff that may or may not pop up on them. They say “No,” to that stuff without hesitation or remorse. Not only do they know when they’ll leave, but they’re flexible to life’s higher priorities and often leave early.

Advertising

The reason they can do this is because they always get the important stuff done at the beginning of the day – often before the average person’s workday even begins. They are members of the Results Economy, they don’t measure their success by hard work and effort.

2. They Eat A Small Piece Of Chocolate

Of course they do. They deserve it. Not only is it an extrinsic reward for another day’s labor, but it generates an endorphin buzz and energy boost from the caffeine chocolate contains. Dark chocolate is not only tastier and healthier, but it has more caffeine than milk chocolate. This little buzz and energy boost is just enough to finish the day strong and not go home a zombie.

Not only does chocolate have psychological benefits, but a 100 gram bar of dark chocolate with 70-85% cocoa contains:

  • 11 grams of fiber.
  • 67% of the RDA for Iron.
  • 58% of the RDA for Magnesium.
  • 89% of the RDA for Copper.
  • 98% of the RDA for Manganese.
  • It also has plenty of potassium, phosphorus, zinc and selenium.

Don’t eat 100 grams though (600 calories!). 50-150 calories is plenty to give you the benefits you need to finish strong. This stuff is over-powered.

Advertising

3. They Compare Their Actual Results To The Day’s Goals

Successful people are accountable to themselves. They keep commitments they’ve made to themselves. They don’t justify bad behavior and lie to themselves! They are highly objective when they examine their daily to-do list. For one thing, their list isn’t very long. They generally have 2-5 things they hope to get done each day. Their days are purposeful and far simpler than the average person. If something important didn’t get done, it gets put on tomorrow’s small priority list.

4. They Mentally Create Their Workday Tomorrow

Dr. Stephen R. Covey has explained that in all things, there are two creations: a mental creation followed by a physical creation. Like an architect that creates a detailed blueprint before a house is physically constructed, successful people create their mental blueprint for the next day.

When they leave the office, they already know they’re going to crush it tomorrow. This builds momentum from day-to-day, helping them accomplish things most people can’t comprehend.

5. They Pause To Reflect On Their Big Picture

Successful people have their life vision in eyeshot of their working space. They look at it frequently throughout the day to remind themselves where they are headed. However, at the end of each day, they take several deep breathes, and take a few minutes to go to their ideal future. They see it happening. They know that today’s work got them that much closer. They don’t doubt or question where they’re going in life. It’s been engrained in their subconscious.

Advertising

Not only do they reflect on their life mission, they also reflect on the brilliance of life in general. They take the time to be grateful for having the ability to do the work they love. They recognize that many people are without the opportunities they have. They don’t take it for granted. They’re truly grateful for the opportunity they’ve had to serve this day in their most authentic capacity.

6. They Write In Their Journal

Everyone knows they should write in a journal. Successful people actually do. They don’t need to spend hours doing it. Just a few minutes is all that’s needed. But they actually take the time to record what happened that day. They’ve been doing it for years and have volumes of history written.

Not only do they write what they’ve done. Building off their life vision, they write the powerful things that are coming for them. They journal their future and it manifests organically.

7. They Clean Their Space

Their office is structured and organized how they like it. They ensure that it’s designed in such a way that personally facilitates their highest insights. At the end of each day, they take a few moments to create the environment they want to walk into the next morning. When they enter the next morning, the subconscious mind clicks into high-performance-mode.

Advertising

8. They Detach From Everything Out Of Their Power

When most people stress out and take our work home with them (or worse, stay long hours to finish), successful people see it for what it is: distraction. Most things work themselves out. Most things can wait for tomorrow. Successful people know this and can quickly let it all go. If things went wrong at work, they don’t let it ruin their evening. It will all work out. They’ll handle it tomorrow. Done is better than perfect.

9. They Make Any Final Essential Communications

Successful people don’t leave people hanging. They reach out and make any final connections needed before going dark for the evening. They set expectations regarding their availability between now and tomorrow morning. They say “Good bye,” “Thank you,” and leave on a positive note. Those they work with feel respected, heard, and appreciated.

10. They Completely Unplug From Work Mode

Most importantly, successful people have a life outside work. They know how to fully live off the job. They know how to unplug and be present with the most important people in their world. They are just as successful in the other aspects of their life as they are at their work. They don’t answer emails after they’ve left. Unless a serious emergency is occurring, they are unreachable to the office.

Successful people’s end-of-workday routines are just as important as their morning routines. Just before leaving the office, they put themselves in a position to be present tonight and to dominate at work tomorrow.

Featured photo credit: Home-office1/citirecruitment via imcreator.com

More by this author

15 Things Insanely-Productive People Do Differently 10 Reasons Why C Students Are More Successful After Graduation 10 Things Successful People Do Differently Before They Leave Their Offices 16 Things Successful People Do to Maximize Their Time Top 10 Books To Equip You With Every Essential Business Skill

Trending in Work

1 How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide) 2 How to Find New Growth Opportunities at Work 3 How to Write a Powerful Mission Statement for Your Business 4 20 Inspiring Vision Statement Examples (2019 Updated) 5 How to Quit Your Unfulfilling Job and Lead Your Dream Career

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Published on March 26, 2019

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

Embarking on a career change, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Regardless of the reason for your desired career change, you need to be very clear on ‘why’ you are making a change. This is essential because you need to have clarity and be confident in your career direction in order to convince employers why you are best suited for the new role or industry.

A well crafted career change cover letter can set the tone and highlight your professional aspirations by showcasing your personal story.

1. Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can feel daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. You can take control and change careers successfully by doing research and making informed decisions.

Getting to know people, jobs, and industries through informational interviews is one of the best ways to do this.[1] Investing time to gather information from multiple sources will alleviate some fears for you to actually take action and make a change.

Here are some questions to help you refine your ‘why’, seek clarity, and better explain your career change:

Advertising

  • What makes me content?
  • How do I want work to impact my life?
  • What’s most important to me right now?
  • How committed am I to make a career change?
  • What do I need more of to feel satisfied at work?
  • What do I like to do so much that I lose track of time?
  • How can I start to explore my career change options?
  • What do I dislike about my current role or work environment?

2. Introduction: Why Are You Writing This Cover Letter?

Make this section concise. Cite the role that you are applying for and include other relevant information such as the posting number, where you saw the posting, the company name, and who referred you to the role, if applicable.

Sample:

I am applying for the role of Client Engagement Manager posted on . Please find attached relevant career experiences on my resume.

3. Convince the Employer: Why Are You the Best Candidate for the Role?

Persuade the employer that you are the best person for the role. Use this section to show that you: have read the job posting, understand how your skills contribute to the needs of the company, and can address the challenges of the company.

Tell your personal story and make it easy for hiring managers to understand the logic behind your career change. Clearly explaining the reason for your career change will show how thoughtful and informed your decision-making process is of your own transition.

Be Honest

Explain why you are making a career change. This is where you will spend the bulk of your time crafting a clear message.

Advertising

Speak to the mismatch that may be perceived by hiring managers, between the experience shown on your resume and the job posting, to show why your unique strengths make you more qualified than other candidates.

Address any career gaps on our resume. What did you do or learn during those periods that would be an asset to the role and company?

Sample:

I have been a high school English and Drama educator for over 7 years. In efforts to develop my career in a new direction, I have invested more time outside the classroom to increase community engagement by building a strong network of relationships to support school programs. This includes managing multiple stakeholder interests including local businesses, vendors, students, parents, colleagues, the Board, and the school administration.

Highlight Relevant Accomplishment

Instead of repeating what’s on your resume, let your personality shine. What makes you unique? What are your strengths and personal characteristics that make you suited for the job?

Sample:

As a joyful theater production manager, I am known to be an incredible collaborator. My work with theater companies have taught me the ability to work with diverse groups of people. The theater environment calls for everyone involved to cooperate and ensure a successful production. This means I often need to creatively and quickly think on my feet, and use a bit of humour to move things forward to meet tight timelines.

Advertising

Feature Your Transferable Skills

Tap into your self-awareness to capture your current skills.[2]

Be specific and show how your existing skills are relevant to the new role. Review the job posting and use industry specific language so that the hiring manager can easily make the connection between your skills and the skills that they need.

Sample:

As the first point of contact for students, parents, and many community stakeholders, I am able to quickly resolve problems in a timely and diplomatic manner. My problem solving aptitude and strong negotiation skills will be effective to address customer issues effectively. This combined with my planning, organization, communication, and multitasking skills makes me uniquely qualified for the role of Client Engagement Manager to ensure that customers maintain a positive view of .

4. Final Pitch and Call-To-Action: Why Do You Want to Work for This Company?

Here’s your last chance to show what you have to offer! Why does this opportunity and company excite you? Show what value you’ll add to the company.

Remember to include a call-to-action since the whole point of this letter is to get you an interview!

Advertising

Sample:

_________ is a global leader in providing management solutions to diverse clients. I look forward to an opportunity to discuss how my skills and successful experience managing multiple stakeholders can help build and retain strong customer relationships as the Client Engagement Manager.

Summing It Up

Remember these core cover letter tips to help you effectively showcase your personal brand:

  • Keep your writing clear and concise. You have one page to express yourself so make every word count.
  • Do your research to determine ‘who’ will be reading your letter. Understanding your audience will help you better persuade them that you are best suited for the role.
  • Tailor your cover for each job posting by including the hiring manager’s name, and the company name and address. Make it easy on yourself and create your own cover letter template. Highlight or alter the font color of all the spots that need to be changed so that you can easily tailor it for the next job application.
  • Get someone else to review your cover letter. At a minimum, have someone proofread it for grammar and spelling errors. Ideally, have someone who is well informed about the industry or with hiring experience to provide you with insights so that you can fine-tune your career change cover letter.

Check out these Killer Cover Letter Samples that got folks interviews!

It is very important that you clarify why you are changing careers. Your career exploration can take many forms so setting the foundation by knowing ‘why’ not only helps you develop a well thought out career change cover letter, [3] but can also help you create an elevator pitch, build relationships, tweak your LinkedIn profile and during interviews.

Remember to focus on your transferable skills and use your collective work experience to show how your accomplishments are relevant to the new role. Use the cover letter to align your abilities with the needs of the employer as your resume will likely not provide the essential context of your career change.

Ensure that your final pitch is concise and that your call-to action is strong. Don’t be afraid to ask for an interview or to meet the hiring manager in-person!

More Resources About Career Change

Featured photo credit: Christin Hume via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next