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11 Amazing Benefits Of Singing You May Not Know

11 Amazing Benefits Of Singing You May Not Know

Anyone who loves to sing will probably tell you how good it makes them feel. It’s no secret that singing reduces stress, improves your mood, and generally brings more fun into your day. But there are many different physical, emotional, social, and psychological benefits associated with singing that you may not realize.

1. Singing releases endorphions and oxytocin.

Endorphins are hormones that increase feelings of euphoria and pleasure. Oxytocin is also known as the “cuddle hormone” because it is released when people snuggle up. It is known to decrease stress and anxiety. Both of these hormones can make you feel better in general and decrease any pain you might be feeling.

2. Singing improves cognition.

Several studies have concluded that singers and musicians typically have higher IQs than non-musicians. Singing can improve your overall brain function and help you think a little clearer.

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3. Singing leads to a longer life.

A joint Yale and Harvard study showed that for some people living in New Haven, Connecticut, choral singing promoted healthy minds and hearts, which increased life expectancy.

4. Singing lowers your blood pressure.

There have been several case studies that have revealed that singing can decrease blood pressure due to it’s calming and relaxing effect. Patients have been able to calm themselves down and lower blood pressure readings when in the hospital by singing hymns.

5. Singing tones up your facial muscles, your diaphragm, and your intercostal muscles.

The proper technique of singing from the diaphragm can strengthen your abdomen and back muscles. You also exercise your facial muscles in unique ways when you sing, which can make your face look more energetic and lively. Your intercostal muscles–the groups of muscles running between the ribs that help form and move the chest wall–will receive quite the workout as well as you sing.

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6. Singing increases empathy and understanding between cultures.

Music can help us to feel connected to all of humanity, even across cultural divides. Singing songs that originated from other cultures can give us a new appreciation for those cultures and help us empathize with others.

7. Singing develops the lungs and gives you better posture.

When you sing, you naturally sit or stand up straighter to get a better sound. Singing also improves your lung capacity and helps you to breathe a little easier.

8. Singing brings people together and creates a sense of community.

Singing in a choir or singing in any sort of group environment with other people can be a fun, bonding activity. It gives you an opportunity to share an experience with a group of people. There have been several studies that have shown singing in a choir decreased depression in many adults.

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9. Singing can help patients of Parkinson’s disease.

There have been numerous studies that have shown how singing can increase the health of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. For these patients, singing can improve vocal and swallowing control in these patients. There are even some studies that suggest music can help patients to regain their balance.

10. Singing improves your memory.

Even if you can’t always remember all of the lyrics to your favorite songs, there is no question that singing requires you to use your memory in ways that you don’t normally. This is one excellent way to keep your brain functioning well as you age.

11. Singing can boost your immunity.

Because singing can lower your blood pressure, cause you to have lower cortisol levels, and decrease your stress and anxiety, it will certainly have a positive effect on your immune system.

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So now you have several reasons to go join that choir you’ve always wanted to join or to just start singing in the car or in the shower. Improve your health and happiness with this incredibly fun activity.

Featured photo credit: Bernd Everding via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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Review Your Past Flow

Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

    Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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