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10 Rituals That Morning People Use To Start Successful Days

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10 Rituals That Morning People Use To Start Successful Days

The early bird catches the worm. Morning people have the advantage of a head start. However, they do not count their success on the chance of spotting a shooting star at dawn. Instead, they create a routine and stick to it. Here are 10 morning rituals that help morning people succeed.

1. They get up an hour early

It is easier for a morning person than for an evening soul to wake before the crack of dawn. Successful morning people don’t take this ability lightly. They consider it one of their many strengths to be nurtured. And we all know that promoting our strengths is the key to success. When you make waking up early a habit, you will have an extra hour a day, everyday, to do more and achieve more.

2. They do exercise

When morning people work out, they get their circulation going and clear their mind. Their body feels better and their thinking gets clearer. Would you agree that it would be a big push for a day of productivity? Then, pick up your running shoes or a yoga mat and start your blood going. You will be grateful for it later.

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3. They go outside to breathe in fresh air

The freshness of the morning air is good for both the body and the mind. One of the first thing a highly achieving person often does in the morning is to step outside. The morning dew reminds her of a new day when she can again start afresh and strike for the best.

4. They list the priorities of the day

Everyday you have a lot of things to do. Finish up a project for the new client. Take your kids to school. Reply to the emails that have been piling up in your inbox. Pick up the dry-cleaning for your wife. And so on. Before digging into any of those many things, a morning person will take a few minutes to pick out a few priorities. Those are the things that you consider most urgent or matter the most.

5. They visualise their steps during the day

An effective way to get things done is to plan ahead. Morning people often map out the whole day way before they start it. What needs to be done? How many steps it involves? Everything can be planned roughly, say, in the shower.

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6. They set goals

A day is not only about ticking off task after task. It is about achieving new things and reaching to a higher level. Successful people often take time to set goals in the morning. What do you want to achieve with this project? Where are you going with mentoring that colleague? Ask yourself questions relating to your goals so you stay focused on achievement.

7. They eat a healthy breakfast

Sometimes there is a temptation to just grab whatever is in the fridge for breakfast, or even to rush out without having it. But neither of these are a good idea. Morning people know better. They make a wholesome breakfast which they enjoy peacefully before whatever hectic day unfolds. Healthy food fuels your body properly and helps you maintain focus throughout the day.

8. They make a perfect cup of coffee, and just sit and think

Morning people have the luxury of time to brew a cup of coffee (or tea) perfectly. The drink not only wakes them up but also gives them the chance to sit down and reflect on life. That is the time for you to be thankful for your beautiful kid or your loving partner. Then there are the exciting projects you are taking on and the helpful colleagues you work with. By the cup of coffee, you reconnect with what is important in your life and the reasons why you get out of bed each morning.

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9. They greet others with a smile

A happy morning soul often greats everyone including strangers. You open up yourself to others. What is more, an friendly good morning with a big smile is contagious. You are helping both you and others relax into a good day.

10. They clear their desk

They recycle yesterday’s newspaper. They tidy up their files and put things back where they belong. Morning people like to start fresh. It is important for their success to keep their place and their mind uncluttered.

Are you a morning person? What are your personal experiences? How far are you in building these habits? Share your thoughts with us.

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Featured photo credit: Man watching sunrise on balcony/Ed Gregory via stokpic.com

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Last Updated on October 28, 2021

How to Organize Your Tasks With Weekly To-Do Lists

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How to Organize Your Tasks With Weekly To-Do Lists

It takes commitment to remain focused and make your week productive. A research conducted by the University of California revealed that you need 30 minutes to refocus after being distracted on a task[1]. With so many distractions pulling at our attention, how can we complete our weekly to-do lists?

With the introduction of new technologies and the popularization of remote work, you can expect more and more distractions. Meanwhile, it is possible to relieve yourself of pressure and burden when you master how to organize your chores, tasks, and responsibilities with weekly to-do lists.

What Is a Weekly To-Do List?

A to-do list is a schedule that itemizes what you need to and when you have to do it. The essence of a to-do list is to enable you to simplify your life and improve task management. You can plan your to-do list every week to ensure that you’re achieving what matters every week.

How to Plan Your Weekly To-Do Lists

Follow these steps to get yourself ready for the week ahead with a comprehensive, simple to-do list.

1. Select a Channel

It is important to find a medium that works for your task lists. You can utilize a pen and printable to-do list or leverage digital applications in managing your weekly to-do lists. However, research suggests that you can remember information better when you write by hand[2]. Nevertheless, find what helps motivate you more and stick with that.

2. Develop Multiple Lists

Your multiple lists should contain:

  • Master list
  • Weekly project list
  • HIT list

Your master list includes every task you want to achieve in the long-term. For instance, complete all Lifehack courses, clean out the bathtub, etc. Your project list contains all the tasks that demand your attention within the next seven days. And then, your high-impact list, or HIT list, includes tasks that you need to attend to within 24 hours.

Every evening, identify the items you need to move from your weekly to-do list to your HIT list for the next day.

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3. Make It Simple

Your weekly to-do lists should not be intimidating. You can simplify your HIT list by highlighting the chores and responsibilities you want to complete today and divide them into two. Ten items are perfect for your HIT list.The accumulation of your HIT list items makes up your weekly to-do li

Batch tasks when creating your weekly to-do lists.

    Begin your HIT list with 2 or 3 important tasks you need to carry out within 24 hours. That way, you don’t waste time cleaning the bathtub instead of completing the presentation that is due tomorrow morning.

    4. Break the Goals Down

    Instead of having an item such as “work on a Kindle book,” you can be more specific by making your goals more manageable. That way, you will eliminate the fear factor. You could have something like: write the book outline on Monday, write the first chapter on Tuesday, and the next chapter the following day.

    5. Include Detailed Information

    You should support every item on your weekly to-do list with information to complete the task. For instance, if an item says “register for a course,” you should include the website and course title. That way, you save yourself the time of scouring for information later.

    6. Time Every Item

    You have 10,080 minutes each week to complete all the tasks on your weekly to do lists. It is reasonable to allocate time for every item on your list. For instance: Write the introduction from 9 am-12 pm, clean the bathtub from 4-5 pm, pick up some groceries at the supermarket from 5-6 pm. Once your time expires, you move on to the next item.

    7. Establish Breaks

    You need to rest a bit after cleaning the bathtub before setting out. You can allocate 15 minutes to relax your mind or prepare for the next task.

    8. Make It Visible and Public

    You can share your to-do list with your accountability partner. Also, post it on your sticky notes, or add tasks to a digital calendar accessible by all team members.

    9. Allocate Time for Scheduling

    It takes time to prepare your weekly to do lists, and the best approach is to schedule a time for that task. Block out your Friday afternoon for organizing items on your weekly to-do lists.

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    10. Start With a Fresh Slate

    Don’t allow old tasks to clog up your schedule. Ensure you organize your tasks with a new list each week. Complete your HIT list each day so you don’t block your weekly project lists with old items.

    Now, it is not enough to prepare your weekly to-do lists; you need to master how to prioritize with the list for maximum productivity.

    How to Prioritize To-Do Lists

    Use the following techniques to maximize your productivity through prioritization.

    1. Use the Getting Things Done (GTD) Method

    David Allen, a productivity expert and author, affirmed that you can be productive despite having a long to-do list. How you plan is what counts. The Getting Things Done technique enables you to focus on your Most Impactful Tasks (MITs) instead of the number of tasks.

    2. Focus on One Task at a Time

    You are aware of which task needs urgent attention. All you need is to focus on that task and its due date before taking out the next.

    It’s not a long list that kills, but multitasking.

    If you choose not to multitask, you will realize that you can make notable progress on difficult projects. Not only that, but your stress level will go down, and you will find more joy in the tasks you’re completing[3].

    3. Evaluate Your Weekly Progress

    It is not easy selecting a few important plans for each week. That’s why you need to reflect every weekend on what worked the previous week and what did not.

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    Also, anytime you complete a task, don’t just tick it as “completed,” but label it as “progress.”

    On Friday evening, assess your Progress list, and study every item. How could it be improved? Follow this process every week.

    4. Ask for Help

    Sometimes, things get out of hand. The best strategy is to request assistance from your teammates, managers, or accountability partner.

    Avoid procrastinating on activities that go beyond your capabilities.

    5. Learn to Say No

    Sometimes, you feel compelled to consent to every request, and you would rather sacrifice all items on your weekly to-do lists to say yes.

    Say no[4] to things that your schedule and energy cannot accommodate. Do what counts towards your long-term objectives.

    Learn how to say no using this article.

    6. Focus on Outcomes, Not the Method

    Focusing on results helps you to determine how to assess your achievement. If you focus on the methods, you may find it difficult to say if an item has been achieved.

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    A result-oriented approach will enable you to mark your goal as “progress.”

    7. Share Your Productivity Strategy

    When you share what you are working on with your teammates, it helps you enjoy a maximum level of support. Furthermore, when you have actualized your goals, share the results with your team and inspire them to do the same.

    8. Choose Themes for Your Week

    If you have different tasks, you can divide your weekly to-do lists into five days of different work sections. Then, take out those tasks each week. Ensure you carry your teammates along on your day’s focus.

    Jack Dorsey[5], Twitter’s CEO, was highly focused when he was doing 80-hours of work per week in two companies. He was exceptionally focused on planning his day, so he developed a theme for his week:

    • Monday: Attend to management issues
    • Tuesday: Work on products
    • Wednesday: Marketing, communications, and growth
    • Thursday: Developers and partnerships
    • Friday: Corporate culture

    Steve Jobs was also productive due to his consistent plan. He held executive meetings on Monday, while he dedicated Wednesdays to advertising and marketing.

    9. Respect Others’ Time

    No one likes to be interrupted, be it via meetings or emails. Respect others’ time: no texts, email, or a call for unnecessary meetings. When you do this, others will be more likely to respect your time, helping you avoid unnecessary distractions.

    Final Thoughts

    Weekly to-do lists can be a great tool to keep you accountable and on task. Use your to-do lists to maximize your time by achieving a smaller set of important tasks and doing your best.

    Practice prioritization by completing your most important tasks first, and feel productive immediately. This will motivate you to push through the rest of the week.

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    More Tips on Getting Things Done

    Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews Digital Content Production via unsplash.com

    Reference

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