Advertising
Advertising

10 Books Mark Zuckerberg Wants You To Read

10 Books Mark Zuckerberg Wants You To Read

Mark Zuckerberg, who founded Facebook when he was a computer science student at Harvard University, is one of the most influential leaders in the world, and at the beginning of this year, he began a challenge read a new book every two weeks. The challenge is called A Year of Books, and he invited anyone interested to take the journey with him and created a Facebook page to chronicle the journey, as well as provide a place for discussion of each of the books.

Zuckerberg has a specific goal in mind as he reads new books this year. He wants to learn more about new cultures, beliefs, histories and technologies, and these categories help in deciding what books to read.

Below are the first ten books in Zuckerberg’s Year of Books challenge.

1. The End of Power: From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being In Charge Isn’’t What It Used to Be by Moisés Naím

the-end-of-power

    The End of Power looks at the way power has been shifting away from those who once held it almost without challenge or question. This includes power shifting from large corporations to small start up businesses, from governmental agencies to the common people, and from men to women. Power shifts can be beneficial, especially in areas where power was abused by those who previously held it, but Naim looks at the way power is actually fading. Naim’s carefully researched book takes a thought-provoking look at the potential dangers of the shifts in power in today’s world.

    Advertising

    2. The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker

     
    the-better-angels-of-our-nature

      This intriguing book looks at the history of mankind and makes the surprising assertion that humanity has actually become less violent and is currently at its most enlightened point in history. Pinker makes this claim despite all the evidence we see on the news on a daily basis. This is an interesting book that gives hope that human beings can be better and seem to be continually headed in that direction.

      3. Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets by Sudhir Venkatesh

      gang-leader-for-a-day

        This is the compelling story of Sudhir Venkatesh who, as a young sociologist, ventured to get an inside look at one of Chicago’s crack-dealing gangs. Venkatesh shows the unique struggles those in a gang face and how difficult it can be to get out of that way of life. What makes this story even more compelling is the unlikely friendship that Venkatesh and the gang leader known as JT develop.

        4. On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss

        on-immunity

          Eula Biss, as a new mother, explores the conceptions people have about vaccinations for children, specifically exploring the question of why people fear vaccinations. It is an intriguing account of human fear and the metaphors associated with injections and the implications for both those who choose vaccinations and those who do not.

          Advertising

          5. Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace

          creativity-inc

            This book was one of the most anticipated of 2014. Ed Catmull was one of the co-founders of Pixar with Steve Jobs and John Lasseter and is now the president of Pixar Animation Studios and Walt Disney Studios. Pixar’s ability to create great films for the last two decades, as well as their creative culture, have made them one of the companies that business leaders and creatives look to for insight on how to create better and develop a solid team structure. Creativity, Inc. is the accumulation of Catmull’s best advice to those who want to learn from Pixar’s success.

            6. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. Kuhn

            the-structure-of-scientific-revolutions

              This book, originally published in 1962, is a foundational text in the scientific community, which explores the processes of discovery in science. Kuhn saw scientific breakthroughs not as something gradual, but as something more revolutionary at the moment it occurs. This is an important book on the history of science.

              7. Rational Ritual: Culture, Coordination, and Common Knowledge by Michael Chwe

              Advertising

              rational-ritual

                Chwe’s book is an examination of the rituals that permeate different cultures and exactly what causes them to become rituals that people share. This is an intriguing look at the role of common knowledge in the development of rituals.

                8. Dealing with China: An Insider Unmasks the New Economic Superpower by Henry M. Paulson

                dealing-with-china

                  Paulson has played a uniquely influential role in China’s development into the economic superpower it is today. In Dealing with China, the former head of Goldman Sachs guides readers through the organization structure of business in China and how to best benefit from and work with China.

                  9. Orwell’s Revenge: The 1984 Palimpsest by Peter Huber

                  orwells-revenge

                    Peter Huber challenges the ideas that Orwell put forth in his novel 1984 because it’s so obvious now that Orwell was wrong about the role technology would play in controlling people’s minds. Orwell’s Revenge is both a rewriting of 1984 with Orwell himself (as Eric Blair) as the protagonist and a discussion of the key themes of Orwell’s book.

                    Advertising

                    10. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

                    the-new-jim-crow

                      Michelle Alexander’s book looks at the continued racial divisions that still take place in our society. Though we should be in an unprecedented time of racial equality, Alexander argues that a racial caste system hasn’t been eliminated. It’s been redesigned. This is a remarkable book about the need to keep moving toward racial equality in American society.

                      Featured photo credit: Mark Zuckerberg F8 Keynote/Brian Solis via flickr.com

                      More by this author

                      5 Strategies for Making Your Fiction Writing Feel More Immersive 10 Books Mark Zuckerberg Wants You To Read 10 Mini Productivity Hacks To Ease Your Life 10 Influential Announcements From Google I/O 2015 10 Reasons Why Introverts Are More Likely To Be Successful

                      Trending in Communication

                      1 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 2 Feeling Stuck in Life? How to Never Get Stuck Again 3 12 Things You Should Remember When Feeling Lost in Life 4 13 Ways Happy People Think and Feel Differently 5 How to Figure Out What Motivates You at Work

                      Read Next

                      Advertising
                      Advertising
                      Advertising

                      Last Updated on January 21, 2020

                      How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

                      How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

                      If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

                      Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

                      So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

                      Advertising

                      1. Listen

                      Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

                      2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

                      Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

                      “Why do you want to do that?”

                      Advertising

                      “What makes you so excited about it?”

                      “How long has that been your dream?”

                      You need this information the help you with the following steps.

                      Advertising

                      3. Encourage

                      This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

                      4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

                      After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

                      5. Dream

                      This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

                      Advertising

                      6. Ask How You Can Help

                      Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

                      7. Follow Up

                      Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

                      Final Thoughts

                      By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

                      Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

                      More on Motivation

                      Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

                      Read Next