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8 Reasons Why Adventurous People Are To Be World-Class Leaders

8 Reasons Why Adventurous People Are To Be World-Class Leaders

The spirit of adventure has been inside every great leader in history. Great achievers like Queen Elizabeth and Steve Jobs; along with movers and shakers like Lady Gaga and Walt Disney, all share a common thread: they weren’t afraid to try something new.

To succeed in life and lead others you must acquire, possess, and maintain an adventurous attitude. Even if you’re afraid to eat at new restaurants and try new foods, or you’d rather die than embarrass yourself in public; you can still learn to be adventurous!

You don’t have to do something that scares you every day (as Eleanor Roosevelt suggested), but you have to get over your fears eventually. Stepping outside of your comfort zone on most days is a good place to start. Consider the following traits of adventurous people to learn why they make phenomenal leaders.

They Have a Vision

Walt Disney believed in his dreams, in spite of a world that told him he was crazy. He knew that it was his optimism and persistence in pursuing the things he had dreamed about that was behind his great success. As he said, “The more a vision can be expressed in a vivid, imaginative way, the more it will motivate people to action in the present.”

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They Do Not Conform

Lady Gaga did not try to imitate or emulate anyone. She wasn’t afraid to go against the norms. She credits these facts with leading to her success. She set standards for herself and ignored naysayers. By trusting her instincts and refusing to conform, the bullied girl that felt out of place as a youth became one of the best-selling musicians of all time, breaking records that no one but herself thought she would break.

Gaga holds 13 Guinness World Records, 6 Grammy Awards, and a Songwriter’s Hall of Fame Contemporary Icon Award (the first ever recipient). She was also listed by TIME as one of the most influential people of the decade in 2013.

They Aren’t Afraid of a Challenge

Peter Dinklage plays Tyrion on HBO’s wildly popular Game of Thrones. He was never afraid to face a new challenge. Born with achondroplasia (a form of dwarfism), Dinklage faced many challenges on his way to becoming an award-winning actor. He credits his sense of humor and natural optimism with readying him for the many obstacles that would come between him and becoming a star.

Dinklage was not afraid to do things others said he couldn’t do – such as becoming a leading actor at only 4-feet, five-inches tall. He knew that without risk there could be no success. He embraced the challenge and succeeded.

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They Are Independent Thinkers

Charles Darwin, the father of evolutionary theory, was expelled from school at 16 for laziness and lack of original thought. Despite his teacher’s disdain for him, Darwin trusted his own judgement and his ability to figure things out independent of other people’s beliefs.

His independent thinking led him to revolutionary insights into the process of Natural Selection and the nature of life on the planet. His Origin of the Species was published in 1859 amid great controversy, but has consequently changed how we all see the world.

They Radiate Persuasiveness

Steve Jobs, founder of Apple Computers, was able to convince the world that they could not possibly live without a personal computer. He was able to sweet talk people into following his vision of the future. To become a leader like Jobs, you must be able to win trust and influence the actions of others through sheer force of will.

They Have a Natural Sense of Wanderlust

Padma Lakshmi was always curious about the world around her. She was anxious to see it. Despite a devastating car accident that left her horribly scarred, Padma had a desire to travel the world as a model.

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Many powerful agents told her that she had little chance of succeeding in the modeling world without major reconstructive surgery. Without any major operations – but with a heart that longed to explore – she not only became a model, but she also became an actor, author and successful television host.

The lesson here? Don’t be like the absurd amount of Americans who don’t take their paid vacation every year. Soak in everything you can from your experiences as you roam away from home.

They Are Courageous and Determined

Tina Fey had the courage to step outside of her comfort zone and become a performer. She is now one of the most successful writers and actors in television and films. Fey is best known for her roles on Saturday Night Live, Thirty Rock and as writer of the feature film Mean Girls.

Her original desire to write comedy was soon abandoned as she realized that she must step in front of the camera to live the life she dreamed. She was bold enough to quell her anxieties, get over her stage fright and achieve the success she craved.

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They Have No Regrets

Bethany Hamilton lost her arm to a 14-foot tiger shark while surfing in Hawaii when she was just thirteen years old. She refused to dwell on her misfortune and had absolutely no regrets about what befell her.She returned to surfing within a month of losing her arm and won a National Surfing title just over a year later.

Adventure comes to those who look for it and embrace it. You can adopt an adventurous spirit even if you’re not among the lucky few who were born with the trait. You can train yourself to be adventurous by opening your mind to new possibilities.

I leave you with the following two reminders. 1: Step outside your comfort zone at every turn. 2: Take every possible opportunity for adventure that presents itself.

Featured photo credit: Pete R. via photos.bucketlistly.com

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Anum Yoon

Writer & Journalist

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Last Updated on December 3, 2019

10 Life Lessons You’d Better Learn Early on in Life

10 Life Lessons You’d Better Learn Early on in Life

There are so many lessons I wish I had learned while I was young enough to appreciate and apply them. The thing with wisdom, and often with life lessons in general, is that they’re learned in retrospect, long after we needed them. The good news is that other people can benefit from our experiences and the lessons we’ve learned.

Here’re 10 important life lessons you should learn early on:

1. Money Will Never Solve Your Real Problems

Money is a tool; a commodity that buys you necessities and some nice “wants,” but it is not the panacea to your problems.

There are a great many people who are living on very little, yet have wonderfully full and happy lives… and there are sadly a great many people are living on quite a lot, yet have terribly miserable lives.

Money can buy a nice home, a great car, fabulous shoes, even a bit of security and some creature comforts, but it cannot fix a broken relationship, or cure loneliness, and the “happiness” it brings is only fleeting and not the kind that really and truly matters. Happiness is not for sale. If you’re expecting the “stuff” you can buy to “make it better,” you will never be happy.

2. Pace Yourself

Often when we’re young, just beginning our adult journey we feel as though we have to do everything at once. We need to decide everything, plan out our lives, experience everything, get to the top, find true love, figure out our life’s purpose, and do it all at the same time.

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Slow down—don’t rush into things. Let your life unfold. Wait a bit to see where it takes you, and take time to weigh your options. Enjoy every bite of food, take time to look around you, let the other person finish their side of the conversation. Allow yourself time to think, to mull a bit.

Taking action is critical. Working towards your goals and making plans for the future is commendable and often very useful, but rushing full-speed ahead towards anything is a one-way ticket to burnout and a good way to miss your life as it passes you by.

3. You Can’t Please Everyone

“I don’t know the secret to success, but the secret to failure is trying to please everyone” – Bill Cosby.

You don’t need everyone to agree with you or even like you. It’s human nature to want to belong, to be liked, respected and valued, but not at the expense of your integrity and happiness. Other people cannot give you the validation you seek. That has to come from inside.

Speak up, stick to your guns, assert yourself when you need to, demand respect, stay true to your values.

4. Your Health Is Your Most Valuable Asset

Health is an invaluable treasure—always appreciate, nurture, and protect it. Good health is often wasted on the young before they have a chance to appreciate it for what it’s worth.

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We tend to take our good health for granted, because it’s just there. We don’t have to worry about it, so we don’t really pay attention to it… until we have to.

Heart disease, bone density, stroke, many cancers—the list of many largely preventable diseases is long, so take care of your health now, or you’ll regret it later on.

5. You Don’t Always Get What You Want

“Life is what happens while you’re busy making other plans.” – John Lennon

No matter how carefully you plan and how hard you work, sometimes things just don’t work out the way you want them to… and that’s okay.

We have all of these expectations; predetermined visions of what our “ideal” life will look like, but all too often, that’s not the reality of the life we end up with. Sometimes our dreams fail and sometimes we just change our minds mid-course. Sometimes we have to flop to find the right course and sometimes we just have to try a few things before we find the right direction.

6. It’s Not All About You

You are not the epicenter of the universe. It’s very difficult to view the world from a perspective outside of your own, since we are always so focused on what’s happening in our own lives. What do I have to do today? What will this mean for me, for my career, for my life? What do I want?

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It’s normal to be intensely aware of everything that’s going on in your own life, but you need to pay as much attention to what’s happening around you, and how things affect other people in the world as you do to your own life. It helps to keep things in perspective.

7. There’s No Shame in Not Knowing

No one has it all figured out. Nobody has all the answers. There’s no shame in saying “I don’t know.” Pretending to be perfect doesn’t make you perfect. It just makes you neurotic to keep up the pretense of manufactured perfection.

We have this idea that there is some kind of stigma or shame in admitting our limitations or uncertainly, but we can’t possibly know everything. We all make mistakes and mess up occasionally. We learn as we go, that’s life.

Besides—nobody likes a know-it-all. A little vulnerability makes you human and oh so much more relatable.

8. Love Is More Than a Feeling; It’s a Choice

That burst of initial exhilaration, pulse quickening love and passion does not last long. But that doesn’t mean long-lasting love is not possible.

Love is not just a feeling; it’s a choice that you make every day. We have to choose to let annoyances pass, to forgive, to be kind, to respect, to support, to be faithful.

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Relationships take work. Sometimes it’s easy and sometimes it’s incredibly hard. It is up to us to choose how we want to act, think and speak in a relationship.

9. Perspective Is a Beautiful Thing

Typically, when we’re worried or upset, it’s because we’ve lost perspective. Everything that is happening in our lives seems so big, so important, so do or die, but in the grand picture, this single hiccup often means next to nothing.

The fight we’re having, the job we didn’t get, the real or imagined slight, the unexpected need to shift course, the thing we wanted, but didn’t get. Most of it won’t matter 20, 30, 40 years from now. It’s hard to see long term when all you know is short term, but unless it’s life-threatening, let it go, and move on.

10. Don’t Take Anything for Granted

We often don’t appreciate what we have until it’s gone: that includes your health, your family and friends, your job, the money you have or think you will have tomorrow.

When you’re young, it seems that your parents will always be there, but they won’t. You think you have plenty of time to get back in touch with your old friends or spend time with new ones, but you don’t. You have the money to spend, or you think you’ll have it next month, but you might not.

Nothing in your life is not guaranteed to be there tomorrow, including those you love.

This is a hard life lesson to learn, but it may be the most important of all: Life can change in an instant. Make sure you appreciate what you have, while you still have it.

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Featured photo credit: Ben Eaton via unsplash.com

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