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10 Books To Change Your Mindset About Money Forever

10 Books To Change Your Mindset About Money Forever

Reading books on finance could help you get rich and structure your financial life appropriately. Here are some books that will be ideal for helping you invest and manage your money.

1. Your Money or Your Life by Vicky Robin and Joe Dominguez

“If you live for having it all, what you have is never enough.”

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    Many people do not set priorities on how they run their expenses. However Your money or Your Life puts the concept of time is money on a literal sense where you have to set priorities, seek passive income and pursue financial independence.

    2. I Will Teach You to be Rich by Ramit Sethi

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      “There is a limit to how much you can cut but there is no limit to how much you can earn.”

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      This book tutors people who are under 30 and making a decent living how to become masters of their money with the least amount of effort. Spending recklessly seems to be common among youths but following Sethi’s serious six-week personal finance program can put you in the right direction.

      3. The Random Walk Guide to Investing by Burton Malkiel

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        “Trust in time, rather than timing.”

        This book is not complex or filled with investing jargon. If you are a beginner and need sound financial principles on how to invest your money, this book is great for you.

        4. Financially Fearless: The LearnVest Program For Taking Control Of Your Money by Alexa Von Tobel

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          “Clearly, having money doesn’t mean you’re immune to money stress. Not for nothing did Notorious B.I.G. coin “Mo Money Mo Problems.”

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          This book is great for young people. Alexa Von Tobel, founder and CEO of Learnvest shares her experience on how she helps her clients make more meticulous planning with their finances. If you are the analytic type, “Financially Fearless” has worksheets in the book, and LearnVest’s online offerings and app.

          5. The Automatic Millionaire by David Bach

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            “Please trust me on this. Nothing will help you achieve wealth until you decide to Pay Yourself First. Nothing.”

            The system David Bach’s recommends in this book offers you an automated approach to managing your personal finances. He provides a strategic solution that makes handling your finances less cumbersome.

            6. The Paradox of Choice by Barry Schwartz

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              “Focus on what makes you happy, and do what gives meaning to your life”

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              What makes us less happy is that we are presented with so many choices. According to Barry Shwartz we are better of making a decision when we have two choices for a product rather than twenty.

              7. Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes (and How to Correct Them) by Gary Belsky and Thomas Gilovich

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                “Would I buy this today, at this price?” If not, you may not want to own it any longer.”

                The use of anecdotes in this book looks at the mental mistakes that cause people to spend more than they are supposed to. Reading this book will help you understand the psychological obstacles on wealth and how you can avoid them.

                8. Work Less, Live More: The Way to Semi-Retirement by Bob Clyatt

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                  Bob Clyatt in this book helps you uncover how you can retire from your job before the traditional retirement age of 65. He suggests techniques such as living on less, putting your investment on autopilot, and more.

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                  9. How to Get Out of Debt, Stay Out of Debt, and Live Prosperously by Jerrold Mundis

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                    “Do what you can, with what you have.”

                    The book centers on the principles of Debtors Anonymous. Real stories from real people are contained in this book on how you can win against the horror of being in compulsive debt.

                    10. You’re So Money: Live Rich, Even When You’re Not by Farnoosh Torabi

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                      “Splurge when it makes sense.”

                      Farnoosh explains how you can spend money without going into debt or draining the bank. She suggests how you can make extra income or find ways to balance your account even you have spent more money than you should have done.

                      Featured photo credit: www.giveagradago.com via projectrenaissance.com

                      More by this author

                      Casey Imafidon

                      Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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                      Last Updated on March 4, 2019

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

                      I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

                      Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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                      Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

                      Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

                      Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

                      I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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                      I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

                      If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

                      Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

                      The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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                      Using Credit Cards with Rewards

                      Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

                      You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

                      I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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                      So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

                      What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

                      Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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