Advertising
Advertising

10 Reasons Why a Simple Lifestyle Reduces Stress and Benefits Your Health

10 Reasons Why a Simple Lifestyle Reduces Stress and Benefits Your Health

I remember the day we began to live simply.

After spending half of the summer cruising with our daughter on a 29-foot sailboat, my husband and I were overwhelmed by the amount of clutter in our four bedroom house. We went through the house, room-by-room, questioning anything that had not been necessary while living on the boat. We filled our station wagon, making twice-daily trips to Goodwill for a week.

The end result was a lifestyle that was immediately calmer. We had more time to spend together, and we noticed that our daughter, who has autism, made marked improvements across the board. We were happy, our communication improved, and we began to talk about the next steps our life would take.

In our case, those next steps involved emptying our house completely, moving across the country, and living aboard a sailboat full time. We might be called “extreme minimalists,” but it is possible to experience the benefits of a simpler lifestyle without having to take such drastic measures.

More and more studies are showing the benefits of taking small steps to simplify your life. A little less screen time, a few less toys, and a slight decrease in stimulation can reap great rewards.

Here are some ways in which a simpler lifestyle can benefit you, physically and emotionally:

Advertising

1. Less television will improve your brain function.

In her article, Electronic Sunset: What Overstimulation Does to Our Days and Nights, published on Huffington Post, Tracy Marks, MD, explains that studies have shown that fast-paced television impairs executive functioning in children and adults. What is executive functioning? It is a set of skills, including planning, working memory, problem solving, and impulse inhibition. While executive functioning is more impaired in children who watch fast-paced programs, adults are also affected.

As we’ve had less “noise” in our lives, I noticed that I remember names and other details much better. My mind feels less cluttered. I used to have to write everything down, and I am needing to do this less now.

2. Simplifying will help you sleep better.

According to Marks, multi-tasking leads to stress and burn-out. Being constantly “plugged in” and trying to complete too many tasks at once greatly increases stress levels. Difficulty sleeping is often one of the first signs that the mind and body are over-stressed. She reports that children and adults who spend too much time trying to do many things at once often end up suffering from a lack of sleep as a result.

This is a benefit of simplicity that my husband and daughter both have noticed. He used to have insomnia nearly every night, and now he has fewer sleepless nights. Our daughter used to throw a tantrum at bedtime, because she was unable to fall asleep. Since we’ve moved onto the boat, she has started putting herself to bed at a reasonable hour. The decrease in stimulation has helped to regulate her sleep-wake cycles.

3. Having less stimulation will help you concentrate better.

In The Negative Effects of Too Many Toys and What to Do About It, published on A Perfect Playroom, Natalie reports that a study funded by the U.S. government found that when children have too many toys, they become overstimulated and cannot concentrate on playing with just one thing. According to Natalie, “They just shut down.”

We have noticed a difference in our daughter’s play since paring down. When her room was filled with toys, she would get them all out and play with none of them, leading to a constant, unused mess. She is not the only one who has noticed this benefit. I have found that I am much more focused on my writing and on building my website now that I have fewer distractions.

Advertising

4. Having less clutter will help you become more creative.

According to Natalie of A Perfect Playroom, a study in Europe found that children played much more creatively when their toys were taken away, and all they had to work with were school supplies. The children also learned to communicate better and work better in groups.

My whole family has noticed an increase in creativity since simplifying our life. My husband is more able to problem-solve and gets less overwhelmed when faced with a challenging situation. My daughter will create villages out of the flatware and has begun creating books for her stuffed animals to read. I have noticed that I have more ideas for my writing and have been able to develop my website in ways I would have not considered before.

5. Less technology may decrease the symptoms of ADD and high sensitivity.

In High Sensitivity is Everyone’s Problem–Reduce Overstimulation and Increase Self-Respect, Susan Meindl states that the increase in ADD and high sensitivity is due, in part, to the increase in stimulation from technology and multi-tasking. With technology, there is more pressure to work and process faster, and this is very overwhelming.

My husband has ADD and noticed that his symptoms have all but disappeared since we have pared down. He also used to suffer from paralyzing anxiety attacks, and those have significantly lessened. Our daughter has decreased her sensory seeking and avoiding behaviors and is performing better in school as a result.

6. Less stimulation will help you to feel better physically.

Meindl also reports that overstimulation causes chronic stress, which takes a toll on the body physically. As energy is depleted, a person will seek to feel better through physical means–avoiding chemicals in food, taking supplements, and so on. While these measures may help, they do not address the core issue–that the person’s body is simply overstimulated and over-stressed.

For years, I lived with a effects of having a body in a chronic state of stress-induced fight-or-flight. As we simplified, I found that I had time to relax and calm this physiological response to stress. I have noticed an increase in energy, improved health, and less muscle pain and tension.

Advertising

7. Having fewer possessions can help you grow spiritually.

In his article entitled What is Voluntary Simplicity?, Nagarja Jade states that living simply can help a person find meaning and grow spiritually, because it takes the focus off of material possessions and helps the person to look inwardly. When a person can no longer use possessions to find meaning and inner peace, they are more likely to find it.

In my case, questioning all of the possessions we are expected to own led to questioning other expectations that society has. And that led to questioning the assumptions I held about myself and my potential. As assumption after assumption fell away, I began to experience a freedom from the restraints of fear.

8. Living simply can help protect the environment.

Jade also reports that having fewer possessions helps to decrease the amount of waste that a person produces. As people become more mindful about what they purchase, they also become more aware of the product’s impact on the environment. Simple living and sustainable living go hand-in-hand, and having a healthier environment will lead to better health for generations to come.

It has amazed me how much less waste we produce, now that we own less. We spend our time and money on experiences, which leave nothing behind in the garbage can.

9. Living simply can decrease chronic stress.

In the article Voluntary Simplicity: Characterization, Select Psychological Implications, and Societal Consequences, Amitai Etzioli states that living a simple lifestyle can decrease the chances that a person will suffer from chronic stress. Having fewer possessions and not worrying about “keeping up with the Jones'” can lead to experiencing fewer stress-related symptoms.

By having fewer possessions to maintain, we found that we spend less time on our jobs. Simplifying has led us to experience a huge increase in our free time. We have time to go to the gym, to pursue our passions, and to go on outings with our daughter. This increase in time has led to a large decrease in stress for all of us.

Advertising

10. Having a simpler lifestyle can improve relationships.

Etzioli also states that when the focus is no longer on accumulating material possessions, people are more likely to focus on relationships. Owning fewer possessions means spending less time managing them, so more time is available to spend with friends and family.

We also noticed that owning less means that we go out into the community more often. We are no longer “walled in” by our possessions. By sharing resources rather than having our own of everything, we have strengthened our friendships and our feeling of belonging to the community.

Voluntary simplicity does not mean giving up your hobbies or the possessions you enjoy. It means only owning what you need, use, and treasure, rather than blindly accumulating possessions because society says you should. It is living intentionally, on your own terms, and every family can benefit from it.

Featured photo credit: Simple/Bethany Rosselit via myjourneytoithaca.files.wordpress.com

More by this author

From Kids To The Elderly: Wisdom On How To Live Your Own Life 9 Signs That You Are Actually A Shy Extrovert 9 Bad Things Happen When You’re Too Nice A Little Of Both? 12 Signs You May Be An Ambivert! 10 Life Lessons For Highly Sensitive People

Trending in Home

1 10 Small Changes To Make Your House Feel Like A Home 2 30 Awesome DIY Projects that You’ve Never Heard of 3 5 Reasons Why Tidying Your Room Can Change Your Life 4 25 Really Cool Cat Furniture Design Ideas Every Cat Owner Needs 5 Scientists Discover Why You Should Take Off Your Shoes Before Entering Your Home

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on December 2, 2019

10 Powerful Ways to Stop Worrying and Start Living Today

10 Powerful Ways to Stop Worrying and Start Living Today

Plato knew that the body and mind are intimately linked. And in the late 1800s, the Mayo brothers, famous physicians, estimated that over half of all hospital beds are filled with people suffering from frustration, anxiety, worry and despair. Causes of worry are everywhere, in our relationships and our jobs, so it’s key we find ways to take charge of the stress.

In his classic book How to Stop Worrying and Start Living, Dale Carnegie offers tools to ditch excessive worrying that help you make a worry-free environment for your private and professional life.

These are the top 10 tips to grab worry by the horns and wrestle it to the ground:

1. Make Your Decision and Never Look Back

Have you ever made a decision in life only to second-guess it afterwards? Of course you have! It’s hard not to wonder whether you’ve done the right thing and whether there might still be time to take another path.

But keep this in mind: you’ve already made your decision, so act decisively on it and dismiss all your anxiety about it.

Don’t stop to hesitate, to reconsider, or to retrace your steps. Once you’ve chosen a course of action, stick to it and never waver.

Advertising

2. Live for Today, Package Things up in “Day-Tight Compartments”

You know that feeling: tossing, turning and worrying over something that happened or something that might, well into the wee hours. To avoid this pointless worrying, you need “day-tight compartments”. Much as a ship has different watertight compartments, your own “day-tight” ones are a way to limit your attention to the present day.

The rule is simple: whatever happened in the past or might happen in the future must not intrude upon today. Everything else has to wait its turn for tomorrow’s box or stay stuck in the past.

3. Embrace the Worst-Case Scenario and Strategize to Offset It

If you’re worried about something, ask yourself: “What’s the worst thing that could happen?” Could you lose your job? Be jailed? Get killed?

Whatever the “worst” might be, it’s probably not so world-ending. You could probably even bounce back from it!

If, for example, you lose your job, you could always find another. Once you accept the worst-case scenario and get thinking about contingency plans, you’ll feel calmer.

4. Put a Lid on Your Worrying

Sometimes we stress endlessly about negative experiences when just walking away from them would serve us far better.

Advertising

To make squashing that worry easier, try this strategy, straight from stock traders: it’s called the “stop-loss” order, where shares are bought at a certain price, and then their price development is observed. If things go badly and the share price hits a certain point, they are sold off immediately. This stops the loss from increasing further.

In the same manner, you can put a stop-loss order on things that cause you stress and grief.

5. Fake It ‘Til You Make It – Happiness, That Is

We can’t directly influence how we feel, but we can nudge ourselves to change through how we think and act.

If you’re feeling sad or low, slap a big grin on your face and whistle a chipper tune. You’ll find it impossible to be blue when acting cheerful. But you don’t necessarily need to act outwardly happy; you can simply think happier thoughts instead.

Marcus Aurelius summed it up aptly:

“Our life is what our thoughts make it.”

6. Give for the Joy of Giving

When we perform acts of kindness, we often do so with the expectation of gratitude. But harboring such expectations will probably leave you disappointed.

One person well aware of this fact was the lawyer Samuel Leibowitz. Over the course of his career, Leibowitz saved 78 people from going to the electric chair. Guess how many thanked him? None.

So stop expecting gratitude when you’re kind to someone. Instead, take joy from the act yourself.

7. Dump Envy – Enjoy Being Uniquely You

Your genes are completely unique. Even if someone had the same parents as you, the likelihood of someone identical to you being born is just one in 300,000 billion.

Despite this amazing fact, many of us long to be someone else, thinking the grass is greener on the other side of the fence. But living your life this way is pointless. Embrace your uniqueness and get comfortable with who you really are: How to Be True to Yourself and Live the Life You Want

8. Haters Will Hate — It Just Means You’re Doing It Right

When you’re criticized, it often means you’re accomplishing something noteworthy. In fact, let’s take it a step further and consider this: the more you’re criticized, the more influential and important a person you likely are.

Advertising

So the next time somebody talks you down, don’t let it get to you. Take it as a compliment!

9. Chill Out! Learn to Rest Before You Get Tired

Scientists agree that emotions are the most common cause of fatigue. And it works the other way around, too: fatigue produces more worries and negative emotions.

It should be clear, therefore, that you’ve got to relax regularly before you feel tired. Otherwise, worries and fatigue will accumulate on top of each other.

It’s impossible to worry when you are relaxed, and regular rest helps you maintain your ability to work effectively.

10. Get Organized and Enjoy Your Work

There are few greater sources of misery in life than having to work, day in, day out, in a job you despise. It would make sense then that you shouldn’t pick a job you hate, or even just dislike doing.

But say you already have a job. How can you make it more enjoyable and worry-free? One way is to stay organized: a desk full of unanswered mails and memos is sure to breed worries.

Advertising

Better yet, rethink about the job you’re doing: What to Do When You Hate Your Job but Want a Successful Career

More About Living a Fulfilling Life

Featured photo credit: Tyler Nix via unsplash.com

Read Next