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10 Reasons Why a Simple Lifestyle Reduces Stress and Benefits Your Health

10 Reasons Why a Simple Lifestyle Reduces Stress and Benefits Your Health

I remember the day we began to live simply.

After spending half of the summer cruising with our daughter on a 29-foot sailboat, my husband and I were overwhelmed by the amount of clutter in our four bedroom house. We went through the house, room-by-room, questioning anything that had not been necessary while living on the boat. We filled our station wagon, making twice-daily trips to Goodwill for a week.

The end result was a lifestyle that was immediately calmer. We had more time to spend together, and we noticed that our daughter, who has autism, made marked improvements across the board. We were happy, our communication improved, and we began to talk about the next steps our life would take.

In our case, those next steps involved emptying our house completely, moving across the country, and living aboard a sailboat full time. We might be called “extreme minimalists,” but it is possible to experience the benefits of a simpler lifestyle without having to take such drastic measures.

More and more studies are showing the benefits of taking small steps to simplify your life. A little less screen time, a few less toys, and a slight decrease in stimulation can reap great rewards.

Here are some ways in which a simpler lifestyle can benefit you, physically and emotionally:

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1. Less television will improve your brain function.

In her article, Electronic Sunset: What Overstimulation Does to Our Days and Nights, published on Huffington Post, Tracy Marks, MD, explains that studies have shown that fast-paced television impairs executive functioning in children and adults. What is executive functioning? It is a set of skills, including planning, working memory, problem solving, and impulse inhibition. While executive functioning is more impaired in children who watch fast-paced programs, adults are also affected.

As we’ve had less “noise” in our lives, I noticed that I remember names and other details much better. My mind feels less cluttered. I used to have to write everything down, and I am needing to do this less now.

2. Simplifying will help you sleep better.

According to Marks, multi-tasking leads to stress and burn-out. Being constantly “plugged in” and trying to complete too many tasks at once greatly increases stress levels. Difficulty sleeping is often one of the first signs that the mind and body are over-stressed. She reports that children and adults who spend too much time trying to do many things at once often end up suffering from a lack of sleep as a result.

This is a benefit of simplicity that my husband and daughter both have noticed. He used to have insomnia nearly every night, and now he has fewer sleepless nights. Our daughter used to throw a tantrum at bedtime, because she was unable to fall asleep. Since we’ve moved onto the boat, she has started putting herself to bed at a reasonable hour. The decrease in stimulation has helped to regulate her sleep-wake cycles.

3. Having less stimulation will help you concentrate better.

In The Negative Effects of Too Many Toys and What to Do About It, published on A Perfect Playroom, Natalie reports that a study funded by the U.S. government found that when children have too many toys, they become overstimulated and cannot concentrate on playing with just one thing. According to Natalie, “They just shut down.”

We have noticed a difference in our daughter’s play since paring down. When her room was filled with toys, she would get them all out and play with none of them, leading to a constant, unused mess. She is not the only one who has noticed this benefit. I have found that I am much more focused on my writing and on building my website now that I have fewer distractions.

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4. Having less clutter will help you become more creative.

According to Natalie of A Perfect Playroom, a study in Europe found that children played much more creatively when their toys were taken away, and all they had to work with were school supplies. The children also learned to communicate better and work better in groups.

My whole family has noticed an increase in creativity since simplifying our life. My husband is more able to problem-solve and gets less overwhelmed when faced with a challenging situation. My daughter will create villages out of the flatware and has begun creating books for her stuffed animals to read. I have noticed that I have more ideas for my writing and have been able to develop my website in ways I would have not considered before.

5. Less technology may decrease the symptoms of ADD and high sensitivity.

In High Sensitivity is Everyone’s Problem–Reduce Overstimulation and Increase Self-Respect, Susan Meindl states that the increase in ADD and high sensitivity is due, in part, to the increase in stimulation from technology and multi-tasking. With technology, there is more pressure to work and process faster, and this is very overwhelming.

My husband has ADD and noticed that his symptoms have all but disappeared since we have pared down. He also used to suffer from paralyzing anxiety attacks, and those have significantly lessened. Our daughter has decreased her sensory seeking and avoiding behaviors and is performing better in school as a result.

6. Less stimulation will help you to feel better physically.

Meindl also reports that overstimulation causes chronic stress, which takes a toll on the body physically. As energy is depleted, a person will seek to feel better through physical means–avoiding chemicals in food, taking supplements, and so on. While these measures may help, they do not address the core issue–that the person’s body is simply overstimulated and over-stressed.

For years, I lived with a effects of having a body in a chronic state of stress-induced fight-or-flight. As we simplified, I found that I had time to relax and calm this physiological response to stress. I have noticed an increase in energy, improved health, and less muscle pain and tension.

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7. Having fewer possessions can help you grow spiritually.

In his article entitled What is Voluntary Simplicity?, Nagarja Jade states that living simply can help a person find meaning and grow spiritually, because it takes the focus off of material possessions and helps the person to look inwardly. When a person can no longer use possessions to find meaning and inner peace, they are more likely to find it.

In my case, questioning all of the possessions we are expected to own led to questioning other expectations that society has. And that led to questioning the assumptions I held about myself and my potential. As assumption after assumption fell away, I began to experience a freedom from the restraints of fear.

8. Living simply can help protect the environment.

Jade also reports that having fewer possessions helps to decrease the amount of waste that a person produces. As people become more mindful about what they purchase, they also become more aware of the product’s impact on the environment. Simple living and sustainable living go hand-in-hand, and having a healthier environment will lead to better health for generations to come.

It has amazed me how much less waste we produce, now that we own less. We spend our time and money on experiences, which leave nothing behind in the garbage can.

9. Living simply can decrease chronic stress.

In the article Voluntary Simplicity: Characterization, Select Psychological Implications, and Societal Consequences, Amitai Etzioli states that living a simple lifestyle can decrease the chances that a person will suffer from chronic stress. Having fewer possessions and not worrying about “keeping up with the Jones'” can lead to experiencing fewer stress-related symptoms.

By having fewer possessions to maintain, we found that we spend less time on our jobs. Simplifying has led us to experience a huge increase in our free time. We have time to go to the gym, to pursue our passions, and to go on outings with our daughter. This increase in time has led to a large decrease in stress for all of us.

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10. Having a simpler lifestyle can improve relationships.

Etzioli also states that when the focus is no longer on accumulating material possessions, people are more likely to focus on relationships. Owning fewer possessions means spending less time managing them, so more time is available to spend with friends and family.

We also noticed that owning less means that we go out into the community more often. We are no longer “walled in” by our possessions. By sharing resources rather than having our own of everything, we have strengthened our friendships and our feeling of belonging to the community.

Voluntary simplicity does not mean giving up your hobbies or the possessions you enjoy. It means only owning what you need, use, and treasure, rather than blindly accumulating possessions because society says you should. It is living intentionally, on your own terms, and every family can benefit from it.

Featured photo credit: Simple/Bethany Rosselit via myjourneytoithaca.files.wordpress.com

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

    More Tips on Getting in Shape

    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

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