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10 Exercises to Fix Your Desk Jockey Posture

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10 Exercises to Fix Your Desk Jockey Posture

Sitting sucks.

We now know for a fact that chronic, prolonged, sitting is horrible for our health. Not only does it create a number of general health problems, it reeks absolute havoc on our posture. Even if you start out sitting in a good posture, sit long enough and the postural muscles will become fatigued.

Once that happens you’re going to start to “slide” into a really awful posture that has come to be known as Desk Jockey Posture. In fact there’s a good chance that you’re in the Desk Jockey Posture right now. Slumped over, shoulders rounded and pulled forward, hands internally rotated, hips rolled forward, low back in a stretched position.

Why is Desk Jockey Posture even a problem?

Because posture is incredibly important, both good and bad. As we sit in “good” posture for a long period of time the postural muscles become tired and we slide into Desk Jockey Posture so we can use the hard structures (the bones) for stability instead of the muscles. Do this enough and the body will change the length tension relationships of the muscles and consequently, the position of the bones in some of the joints will change. When this happens often enough for long enough, you adapt and lock in this new posture. The Desk Jockey Posture will become your new “normal” posture.

Desk Jockey Posture contributes to a number of issues, some of them include:

  • Shoulder pain
  • Elbow pain
  • Neck pain
  • Headaches
  • Upper, Mid and Lower back pain
  • Anterior (front side) hip pain
  • Knee pain

What it comes down to is that this is an awful position to be in, especially when you’re spending hours at a time everyday in that position. But there are some very easy exercises that you can do almost anywhere that can help you “reset” into a more neutral posture.

1. Overhead Warrior Lunge

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3-Overhead-Reverse-Lunge

    Get into a lunge stance with the hips in neutral (belt should be flat). Squeeze the glute on the same side as the leg that’s behind you and press the hip forward. Make sure you keep the ribcage down in neutral and reach overhead trying to pull the ribs apart. Each reach should unlock/ expand the ribcage a bit more. Be sure not to extend from the lower back.

    2. Hip Flexor Stretch

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hmec1bQBQOE

    Get into a lunge stance with the hips in neutral and ribcage down. Put pressure in the front heel, squeeze the glute on the stretched (knee on the ground) leg, and press only the hip forward. You can make this more intense by putting the back foot up on a bench, chair, or against a wall.

    3. Chest Stretch

    Chest Stretch Edit

      Stand in a doorway with the shoulders down in the joints. Hold your arms out (they can be bent at the elbow) and lean in keeping the ribcage down. Think about “opening” the chest.

      4. Thoracic Extensions

      These can be done over a foam roller or a hard back chair that comes one half to two-thirds up the back. Sit tall, natural arch in the lower back and chest up. Place the hands behind the head, elbows forward, and reach back over the chair or roller. Don’t just extend the neck/ look up. Keep the chin in a neutral position and extend the ribcage over the chair back or roller. Focus on “opening” the ribs and pulling them apart. The lower back should never move.

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      5. Thoracic Rotations

      Start in a quadruped position:

      • On all fours
      • Hands under shoulders, elbows locked.
      • Knees under the hips
      • Shoulders in the shoulder joint, chest up slightly

      Place one hand behind the head, look at the elbow and rotate through the ribcage. Start elbow to elbow and rotate up as far as you can without moving from the lower back or shifting the ribcage.

      Quick Tip: If the belly button moves/ rotates, you’re moving from the lower back.

      6. Scapula Pinches

      scap pinch_edited

        Sit or preferably stand tall, with the shoulders down. Pinch the shoulder blades together in the back. Hold this fully pinched position for a count of one to five and repeat.

        7. Trap Stretch

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        Trap Stretch_edit2

          Sit tall, with the hips neutral and feet flat in front. Reach a hand up over the head and gently pull the head towards the shoulder. Don’t yank on your head, that could cause injury. The hand isn’t pulling on the head; it’s just assisting gravity a bit. Do this 1–3 times for 30–60 seconds at a time.

          8. Levator Scapula Stretch

          stephlevator

            Set up the same as the Trap Stretch, but instead of facing forward, look at an armpit and gently pull the head in that direction. Again, 1–3 times for 30–60 seconds at a time.

            9. Glute Bridge

            glute bridge

              Lay on your back; bring the feet up so that when the hips are fully extended (up) the knees will be a at ninety degrees. Keep the ribcage down, drive through the heels, sqeeze the glutes HARD and press the hips into full extension. Hold the top, really focusing on a hard squeeze, and return to the starting position.

              A lot of hip and low back pain is the result of weak, underactive glutes, and sitting all day in Desk Jockey Posture essentially shuts your glutes down completely. Simply performing a few glute bridges can not only keep them from shutting down completely, but these may help reset the sacrum and alleviate some hip and lower back pain. Be sure to focus on using the glutes and shutting down the hamstrings.

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              If the two legs is too easy opt for the single leg version.

              single leg glute bridge

                10. Scap Pushups

                Get into a pushup plank position. Maintain this tight line and allow the scapula to move to the midline of the body as the torso falls. At the lowest point press the ground away and the shoulder blades to the outside of the shoulders.Make sure you keep your elbows straight, bending them will create false movement at the elbows and not the shoulders.

                Don’t think that these can be a cure-all. Simply doing these once or twice a day won’t offset 8 hours of sitting in Desk Jockey Posture. You need to me conscious of your posture through the day, continue to stay active, mobile and strong so you can maintain good posture for as long as possible and return to a neutral position easily. These exercises will, however, help to stem the tide of tissue creep and make you feel a bit better, maintain some mobility,open up some tight areas and activate muscles that shut down when we spend to much time being a Desk Jockey.

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                Last Updated on December 2, 2021

                The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

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                The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

                Camping can be hard work, but it’s the preparation that’s even harder. There are usually a lot of things to do in order to make sure that you and your family or friends have the perfect camping experience. But sometimes you might get to your destination and discover that you have left out one or more crucial things.

                There is no dispute that preparation and organization for a camping trip can be quite overwhelming, but if it is done right, you would see at the end of the day, that it was worth the stress. This is why it is important to ensure optimum planning and execution. For this to be possible, it is advised that in addition to a to-do-list, you should have a camping checklist to remind you of every important detail.

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                Why You Should Have a Camping Checklist

                Creating a camping checklist makes for a happy and always ready camper. It also prevents mishaps.  A proper camping checklist should include every essential thing you would need for your camping activities, organized into various categories such as shelter, clothing, kitchen, food, personal items, first aid kit, informational items, etc. These categories should be organized by importance. However, it is important that you should not list more than you can handle or more than is necessary for your outdoor adventure.

                Camping checklists vary depending on the kind of camping and outdoor activities involved. You should not go on the internet and compile a list of just any camping checklist. Of course, you can research camping checklists, but you have to put into consideration the kind of camping you are doing. It could be backpacking, camping with kids, canoe camping, social camping, etc. You have to be specific and take note of those things that are specifically important to your trip, and those things which are generally needed in all camping trips no matter the kind of camping being embarked on.

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                Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next camping trip.

                1. First off, you must have found the perfect campground that best suits your outdoor adventure. If you haven’t, then you should. Sites like Reserve America can help you find and reserve a campsite.
                2. Find or create a good camping checklist that would best suit your kind of camping adventure.
                3. Make sure the whole family is involved in making out the camping check list or downloading a proper checklist that reflects the families need and ticking off the boxes of already accomplished tasks.
                4. You should make out or download a proper checklist months ahead of your trip to make room for adjustments and to avoid too much excitement and the addition of unnecessary things.
                5. Checkout Camping Hacks that would make for a more fun camping experience and prepare you for different situations.

                Now on to the checklist!

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                Here is how your checklist should look

                1. CAMPSITE GEAR

                • Tent, poles, stakes
                • Tent footprint (ground cover for under your tent)
                • Extra tarp or canopy
                • Sleeping bag for each camper
                • Sleeping pad for each camper
                • Repair kit for pads, mattress, tent, tarp
                • Pillows
                • Extra blankets
                • Chairs
                • Headlamps or flashlights ( with extra batteries)
                • Lantern
                • Lantern fuel or batteries

                2.  KITCHEN

                • Stove
                • Fuel for stove
                • Matches or lighter
                • Pot
                • French press or portable coffee maker
                • Corkscrew
                • Roasting sticks for marshmallows, hot dogs
                • Food-storage containers
                • Trash bags
                • Cooler
                • Ice
                • Water bottles
                • Plates, bowls, forks, spoons, knives
                • Cups, mugs
                • Paring knife, spatula, cooking spoon
                • Cutting board
                • Foil
                • soap
                • Sponge, dishcloth, dishtowel
                • Paper towels
                • Extra bin for washing dishes

                3. CLOTHES

                • Clothes for daytime
                • Sleepwear
                • Swimsuits
                • Rainwear
                • Shoes: hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes
                • Extra layers for warmth
                • Gloves
                • Hats

                4. PERSONAL ITEMS

                • Sunscreen
                • Insect repellent
                • First-aid kit
                • Prescription medications
                • Toothbrush, toiletries
                • Soap

                5. OTHER ITEMS

                • Camera
                • Campsite reservation confirmation, phone number
                • Maps, area information

                This list is not completely exhaustive. To make things easier, you can check specialized camping sites like RealSimpleRainyAdventures, and LoveTheOutdoors that have downloadable camping checklists that you can download on your phone or gadget and check as you go.

                Featured photo credit: Scott Goodwill via unsplash.com

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