Great presentations are memorable, instructive and referenced for many years. Great presentations encourage and educate audiences. Most successful public speakers have refined their skills to deliver memorable presentations in front of a live audience. Here is a summary of the process to make your next presentation one your audience will never forget.

1. Show confidence

If you’re worried or nervous, to counteract your anxiety, show fictitious self-assurance. Stand up unconventionally, show a nice smile and strengthen your mindset with positive considerations. While giving or preparing for a presentation always remember the five P’s: prior planning prevents poor performance. The more you exercise, the more confident you will feel when giving presentations in front of the audience.

2. Make connections

Making connections with the audience can greatly help you in having memorable presentations. Be interactive by looking at the entire audience during your presentation. Smile at an unfamiliar person in the audience. Your subtle signals will make the presentation more like a conversation between associates than a formal presentation.

3. Introduce yourself memorably

If you are going to give a presentation at an event, the organizer will most likely introduce you before your presentation. But don’t hinge on the organizer to endear you to the audience. Before you start your presentation, introduce yourself with one or two quick verdicts. Avoid repeating your resume for the introduction; instead, quickly inform your audience who you are and why they should pay attention to what you have to say.

4. Stay accessible

Select a social medium to connect with the people during and after the presentation. In social media, Twitter is a widespread choice because audience members might want to tweet something interesting or profound they have found in your presentation. As an alternative, you can either share your blog, website or email address.

5. Tell stories

Every Tom, Dick and Harry love a great story. Great presentations are not rational speeches; they feel like emotional descriptions conveyed in a sensational and engaging way. Engage and involve your audience by sharing information in the form of a story. Support your presentation with personal experiences, obstacles and achievements to exemplify your points.

6. Practice delivery

A memorable presentation is so appealing that it makes the presenter forget about himself and become captivated in the presentation. Rehearse your presentation over and over until you remove the interference including nerviness and prickly gaps. Pay full attention to your body language. Great presenters work this phase in a usual way.

7. Speak the language

Great presentations don’t leave people pondering what you have said in the presentation. It might be appealing to say a few big words, but it would make your audience feel estranged. Always clarify terms, abbreviations and contractions.

8. Deep research

Having a memorable presentation that will never vanish from the minds of the audience, requires more than the usual information given in your presentation. Do deep research and find some significant fact beyond your topic. Give them the unexpected. Ambiguous and opposing information will raise heads and encourage discussion.

9. Simple slides

Be careful about your presentation content. If you want your presentation to be unforgettable, don’t be like everyone else. Use simple slides in your presentation to highlight and emphasize key points.

10. Conclude with a call to action

Concluding with a call to action is something your audience can do immediately. Memorable presentations are inspiring, but people face hitches to apply that knowledge to their daily lives. To leave a sense of obligation share the results of your experience, victories and achievements. Inform your audience precisely how they can achieve similar outcomes.

Confidence, preparation and great listening skills are compulsory to end a fabulous and memorable presentation. “Always speak from the heart and tell the truth; it will delight some and surprise the rest.”

Featured photo credit: brightcarbon.com via brightcarbon.com

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