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Stay Alert! These 5 People May Destroy Your Business

Stay Alert! These 5 People May Destroy Your Business

As humans, we are all liable to experience emotional peaks and troughs throughout our lives. This is an inescapable consequence of life–our emotional state is heavily influenced by those around us. According to a 2010 study conducted by the Proceedings of the Royal Society, every positive person that you include in your life increases your chances of being happy by 11%. In contrast, it only takes one sad friend or acquaintance to upset this balance and make you unhappy, so your choice of friends and confidants is critically important.

This principle can also be applied to your business, where the people that you employ and partner with have a huge impact on future success or failure. With this in mind, you need to beware of the following five personality types and their potential to destroy your business:

1. The Flat-track Bully

As a general rule, bullies are loud, aggressive and outwardly confident individuals who are have an ability to initially stand out from the crowd and earn recognition from their superiors. This is why they are such a danger to your business: they have a tendency to create a positive impression on employers while distressing their colleagues and having a negative impact on productivity. As these individuals progress at the expense of others and gain greater authority, your business will begin to deteriorate beneath your very nose.

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The biggest issue with bullies is that they are often unable to do their job particularly well, especially those who advance into management roles. Once afforded authority, bullies are likely to wield this in a discriminating manner and target weaker or more skilled colleagues in a bid to undermine their confidence. This will cause your business to lose top talent and experience reduced productivity levels, while it will also fall prey to an increase in stress-related illness in the workplace. To avoid this personality type, you must understand their behavior in detail while also ensuring that your employees have a clear definition of what constitutes bullying and how to report it.

2. The Resentful Former Colleague

Occasionally, you may be required to employ individuals that you do not like. While this may sound strange, there are times where you must sacrifice personal feelings in order to optimize top talent and drive your business forward. This is most likely to occur as your launch your start-up venture, since building a successful venture requires you to maximize every possible resource at your disposal. So if you have a former colleague with considerable skill in their field and the ability to help your business grow, you may need to approach them regardless of your personal relationship.

This is a balancing act, however, as a deep dislike for another human being can create mistrust and considerable tension over time. The effects of this can be diverse and extremely impactful, whether attempting to manage a difficult relationship distracts you from achieving your business goals, or the employee in question begins to resent your superior status and develops a sense of indifference to the future of the firm. Try to consider this balance before taking such an individual on, weighing the potential cost to the business against the value that the individual can bring. It may well be that you are simply too alike, in which case the issues can be resolved through learning and communication.

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3. The Ambitious Self-server

There are a number of reasons why stable businesses fail and become insolvent, with one of the most common being the poor retention of talented employees. It is with this in mind that you must beware of ambitious self-servers, as these characters are similar to bullies in that they will often strive to get ahead at the expense of others rather than through their own merit. While bullies use their aggression to force mistakes from their colleagues and report these to management, an ambitious self-server is far more likely to influence senior colleagues directly through charm and persuasion.

Given that this personality type are only interested in their own advancement as opposed to the progression of the business, this often leads to poor and misplaced decision making on your behalf. This can have a huge impact on the retention of talented employees, as some may be unfairly let go while others simply choose to leave the company and work for an employer that respects ability and application rather than charm. To avoid this, you need to take ownership of each individual business decision and make choices based on fixed criteria.

4. The Narcissist

Teamwork makes the dream work, right? After all, businesses thrive on the collaboration between diverse and skilled teams which combine multiple strengths in the pursuit of a single, professional goal. While most personality types can thrive when given a role in a team of people, one that struggles in this regard is the narcissist. These individuals are always more consumed with themselves than with their team-mates or the business as a whole, meaning that they often fail to take direct action when working with others.

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While narcissists will not necessarily employ underhand tactics to further themselves, they are almost always arrogant and lack empathy for the people around them. This makes it extremely unlikely that they would work late to cover an absence or take on additional work to help complete a project, unless, of course, this would result in some form of individual recognition or individual reward. If you do discover a narcissist within your ranks, strive to utilize their self-serving motivation by giving them individual roles in which they can shape their own destiny (such as a commission-based sales job). This will turn a threat into an asset and help to maximize the talent at your disposal.

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    5. The Negative Energy Sapper

    Let’s face facts: there are some people in life who possess a decidedly negative energy. Whether this is part of their innate personality or the result of experience, such negativity can become consuming when it is projected onto your decisions and business management. This is debilitating for any business, as it encourages decisions that are made out of fear and conservatism rather than sound commercial logic and the fundamental balance between risk and reward. Just as aggression and recklessness in business can lead to losses, so too negativity can cause firms to stagnate slowly over time.

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    The impact of negativity is also felt more substantially throughout the whole of the business, since it begins to alter the outlook of individual employees and creates incredibly low morale. This can ultimately lead to the loss of core human assets and talented employees, while also driving down productivity and making it difficult to effectively engage customers. While negative individuals are often unaware of their impact and are not necessarily at fault for the way in which they think, you should avoid hiring those with excessive amounts of negative energy if you wish to develop and expand your venture.

    Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pixabay.com

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    Last Updated on March 12, 2019

    20 Inspiring Vision Statement Examples (2019 Updated)

    20 Inspiring Vision Statement Examples (2019 Updated)

    There is normally a lengthy list of things you need to consider when starting a business, and if you don’t manage them properly, your excitement can quickly turn into overwhelm. What can support you to stay inspired and on the right track when starting out? You guessed it: this is your vision statement.

    What Is a Vision Statement?

    A vision statement is like a photograph of your future business, which gives your business shape and direction.

    A vision statement provides the direction and describes what the founder wants the organization to achieve in the future; it’s more about the “what” of a business. It is different from a mission statement, which describes the purpose of an organization and more about the “how” of a business.

    If you were to take a photo of your future business now, what would it look like? What do you want your business to be recognized for one day?

    You need to have a crystal clear vision when you start out, otherwise you can get easily lost in deciding the best way forward. When you are making strategic decisions for your business and even daily operation decisions, your vision statement will give you the inspiration and targeted direction you need.

    The Importance of a Vision Statement

    Without a vision statement, your business will lack motivation to keep going.

    If you don’t aim for anything, you might not hit anything. The more specific and clear you are, the better your chances are at seeing your vision turn into reality.

    The importance of a vision statement cannot be overlooked; not only does it provide long term direction and guidance, but it also gives you the inspiration and the necessary energy to keep going when you feel lost.

    Always keep your vision statement alive by revisiting it regularly and communicating your vision with other members of the team, to inspire and motivate them as well.

    How to Craft an Inspiring Vision Statement

    1. Dream big and use clear language

    An inspiring vision statement should inform a clear direction and priorities for the organization, while challenging all the team members to grow together. Based on our expert sources’ advice, we’ve got some great tips for you:

    • Imagine how you want the business to be like in five to ten years.
    • Infuse the business’ values in the statement.
    • Make sure that the statement is implying a clear focus for the business.
    • Write your vision statement in the present tense.
    • Use clear and concise language.
    • Ensure the statement is easily understood.

    There are many different types of vision statements and there is no wrong or right way to do it. The most important thing is to resonate with it. It will always inspire you and give you a clear targeted direction.

    2. Get inspirations from the successful companies.

    Having researched on a number of successful companies’ vision statements, I’ve shortlisted 20 good examples for the new startups:

    Short vision statements made up of a few words only:

    1. Disney

    To make people happy.

    2. Oxfam

    A just world without poverty.

    3. Ikea

    To create a better every day life for the many people.

    Quantitative statements are based on numbers, quantities:

    4. Microsoft

    Empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

      5. Nike

      Bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete* in the world. (*If you have a body, you are an athlete.)

        Qualitative statements are based on qualities that you want to have:

        6. Ford

        People working together as a lean, global enterprise to make people’s lives better through automotive and mobility leadership.

        7. Avon

        To be the company that best understands and satisfies the product, service and self-fulfillment needs of women—globally.

        Competitor based statements – this type is becoming less common, but famous examples are:

        8. Honda – in 1970

        We will destroy Yamaha.

        9. Nike – in 1960s

        Crush Adidas.

          10. Philip Morris – in 1950s

          Knock off RJR as the number one tobacco  company in the world.

          Role Model Vision Statements – using another company as an example:

          11. Stanford University – in the past

          To become the Harvard of the West.

          12. Reach for Success – in the past

          To become the next Tony Robbins in self development.

          Internal Transformations vision statements:

          13. Apple

          To produce high-quality, low cost, easy to use products that incorporate high technology for the individual.

          14. Giro Sport Design

          To make sure that riding is the best part of a great life.

          15. Tesla

          To accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.

          16. Sony

          To be a company that inspires and fulfills your curiosity.

          17. Facebook

          To give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.

            Longer and more detailed vision statement:

            18. Walmart

            To give customers a wide assortment of their favorite products, Every Day Low Prices, guaranteed satisfaction, friendly service, convenient hours (24 hours, 7 days a week) and a great online shopping experience.

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            19. Coca Cola

            To achieve sustainable growth, we have established a vision with clear goals:

            Profit: Maximizing return to share owners while being mindful of our overall responsibilities.

            People: Being a great place to work where people are inspired to be the best they can be.

            Portfolio: Bringing to the world a portfolio of beverage brands that anticipate and satisfy peoples; desires and needs.

            Partners: Nurturing a winning network of partners and building mutual loyalty.

            Planet: Being a responsible global citizen that makes a difference.

              20. Heinz

              Our VISION, quite simply, is to be: “The World’s Premier Food Company, Offering Nutritious, Superior Tasting Foods To People Everywhere.” Being the premier food company does not mean being the biggest but it does mean being the best in terms of consumer value, customer service, employee talent, and consistent and predictable growth.

              The Bottom Line

              Remember, always keep your vision statement up-to-date to direct your company’s actions.

              Remember, once you reach your vision, it needs to be changed. General Motors overtook Ford as #1 automotive company in the world because once Ford’s goal was reached, they never updated it.

              Keep your vision statement alive and visibly in front of you, revisit it and let it help direct your actions and activities. This is the fun part: this is where you get to dream really big and allow your imagination to fly as high as you want.

              Don’t hold back, let your creative juices flow and give yourself permission to explore what is possible for your business.

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              To your success!

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