Advertising
Advertising

12 Things You’re Doing Wrong At Work – And How To Fix Them Instantly

12 Things You’re Doing Wrong At Work – And How To Fix Them Instantly

Does one of these sound familiar: You’re recently out of school, in your first few years in an office gig and trying to learn the ropes. Or, you’ve been a professional for a while–but aren’t learning or advancing as fast as you’d like.

No matter where you went to school, there are things no one teaches. We assume the best performers are on call 24/7, do what the boss says, and fit in seamlessly with team members–right? Not! Here are some things we often assume starting out in the workplace that might be hurting your career more than helping it.

1. You respond immediately to all emails.

This shows you’re on the ball, ready to act, an email machine… right? Well, yes and no. Responsiveness can be a plus, especially if you’re responsive to your boss. But if your hastily-dashed-off-response means you forgot to include an attachment, or creates an extra email–like when you respond to a request with a clarifying question–you look disorganized and can actually slow things down. A speedy response is only helpful if it’s correct and appropriate. Sometimes, it’s better to wait and think things through until you can reply with all the info requested.

Advertising

2. You’re online 24/7.

Sending emails at all hours can make you seem committed. But it also gives you a false feeling of efficiency. What you’re likely overlooking as you congratulate yourself for your dedication (you ARE the job!) – your colleagues will quickly come to expect that you’re online 24/7, which results in a vicious cycle. Your boss or team may send emails requiring an overnight response simply because, hey, they assume you’ll be there. Work will expand to fit whatever time you give it. Being on call 24/7 is bad for your health and dangerous long-term–so don’t do it! If you’re in a new job, or a role in which 60-80 hour weeks are the norm, then you likely won’t be punching out at 5. But, if your job constantly takes 12 or more hours a day, it’s a good sign that there’s a better way to do it.

3. You spend your time with a core group.

It’s great to have a team with which you work and socialize. But in a larger company, it’s important to branch out. If you’re in marketing, make friends and find sponsors (more senior staff who take an interest in your career) in HR, or operations. This will expand your perspective and let you find out about new opportunities for projects, development and promotion across the firm. So get out of your comfort zone and meet new friends next time you’re in the corporate cafe or are assigned to a cross-functional project!

4. You avoid difficult people.

We learn early on to steer clear of those who give us grief. This works well on the playground–but not in the office. We all love spending time with people we get on with. But, we can learn the most from those with divergent opinions (even when they’re hard to hear) and distinct personalities. Don’t be afraid to engage with people who may seem a bit abrasive or who hold different perspectives. It’s the people who challenge us that make us better–not the ones who think exactly like we do. And, as you advance in your career, you’ll have to work with more and more kinds of people, so it’s great practice.

Advertising

5. You dress like everyone else.

Ever hear the phrase dress for the job you want, not the job you have? Clothes aren’t everything. But if you’re aspiring to move up, or take a public-facing role, it’s easier for senior people to picture you there if you already look the part. It’s also a great way to set yourself apart from other contenders–the small things matter and it shows you’re committed to the details. It’s also worth trying to stand out from the masses, but do so in a way that’s appropriate for your work place. If you’re at a law firm, you’ll likely be making more conservative choices than your friend who works at a design agency.

6. You never ask for help.

Going it alone is a sign of strength… right? Sometimes it’s good to invite others’ input. This can not only provide new perspective but help others feel invested in your project. Going to individuals other than your boss is a great way to do this. If one of your colleagues has a great eye, ask her for input on your latest PowerPoint or Prezi. Most people like being asked to contribute, so long as it’s easy for them to say yes. Note: be cautious of inviting input if you don’t expect to take it! Colleagues will quickly catch on and be less inclined to weigh in next time.

7. You let perfection be the enemy of good.

The 80/20 rule says that 20% of the efforts produce 80% of the results. Know which part of your effort is the 20%, and which part of the results are the 80%! Economists call this diminishing marginal returns, which basically means that you can put lots more effort into something and get only modest benefits. Sometimes it’s better to get something done fast and well than spending three times as long to make it perfect. Understanding what, of your portfolio, can be done faster and what needs your full attention is a critical skill to mastering your job and moving up.

Advertising

8. You try to be good at everything.

Guess what–everyone has weaknesses! And if you’re one of those superhuman types that’s good at nearly everything, here’s an important lesson: just because you’re able to do something doesn’t mean you should. Instead of trying to love what you’re good at, get good at what you love. Show competence at navigating tricky administrative issues and people will come to you as a fixer. If you love being a fixer, great; if you don’t want to be tagged a fixer, then be cautious about displaying those talents to the world! Instead, showcase your writing skills (because you love to write) or your people skills (because you dream of being in recruitment).

9. You live for your to-do list.

Having a to-do list is ok–if it’s a certain kind of to-do list. First, it should not just be urgent but important items. Focus on fighting fires and you’ll always be in damage control mode. Include tasks (usually project or strategy work) that won’t burn if you don’t get to them today – the paradox is, because they’re never urgent you may never get to them. And almost always, it’s those projects that will make or break your company’s, and your, success. Second, know yourself. Everyone has best times of day for writing, or mindless tasks; times when they’re focused and distracted; times when they’re patient and impatient. Schedule your to-dos to take advantage of that! If you’re most creative in the morning, do your writing or big idea work then.

10. You’re afraid to fail.

All of us like to succeed. We can get tempted to stay in a safe zone where we know we’re performing well and can do a great job. But the real wins happen when we stretch ourselves and take risks. The best managers and executives know this, and will support you in setting stretch goals and trying new things–hitting up that new market or trying a new process might be the next big break for the company (and for you)! And when you fail (which we all do from time to time), be ready to pick yourself back up. We learn more from losses than from wins, so treat each setback as a rich source of learning.

Advertising

11. You don’t know your value proposition.

Know how you create value at work. It may be through helping groups of diverse people get to common ground, or writing killer proposals, or keeping morale up through tough periods of work. If you’re not sure what you bring to the table, write down the things you do better than anyone else at work. Then think about which of those contribute most to the company’s business–if you weren’t there to do those things, how would it affect the organization? This can do two very important things: 1. it helps you understand what, from a company perspective, you’re worth (very helpful when negotiating that promotion or raise), and 2. it can help you see where you fit long term and how to market yourself to a prospective employer.

12. You wait to be told what to do.

Take initiative. Companies are built on creativity and strategic thinking. If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten. If you’re listening to a project update in a meeting and have an idea that could help, speak up–but do pick your time. It might be best to say it then and there, or it might be better to follow up after. It depends on the culture and formality of meetings and roles.

Try some of these tips to get ‘unstuck’ at work–and maybe even give you the energy, perspective, or confidence needed to move up the ladder or take on new challenges. It’s amazing how a few changes help you see yourself and your career in a new light!

Featured photo credit: Alexander Stein via pixabay.com

More by this author

7 Ways to Find Happiness Instantly Procrastinating 5 Times Procrastinating Can Make You More Productive Willpower cupcake 10 Willpower Hacks to Help Achieve Your Goals Success Coach Yourself to Success in 5 Steps 10 Ways Helping Others Will Improve Your Life

Trending in Work

15 Powerful Ideas on How to Be Productive at Work 211 Things You Can Do To Increase Employee Productivity 3How to Quit Your Job That You Hate and Start Doing What You Love 419 Ways to Use Creative Thinking in the Workplace to Up Your Credibility 5How to Ace an Interview: 17 Things That Hiring Managers Look For

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

5 Powerful Ideas on How to Be Productive at Work

5 Powerful Ideas on How to Be Productive at Work

Not being able to stay productive at work is a problem that everyone runs into at some point; no matter how much you like your job, there are certain factors that prevent you from staying at maximum proficiency throughout the whole day.

A lack of productive focus at work can lead to extra stress on yourself, missed deadlines, passed opportunities, raise denial, demotion and even termination.

So, if you are someone who has trouble with your productivity, here are five effective tips on how to be productive at work:

1. Take breaks

First and foremost, it’s important for you to take regular breaks. Trying to work throughout the whole day will tire your brain, which will then cause you to doze off and think about something else.

If you keep working your brain, it will fill up and get jumbled with information—sort of like a computer hard drive. Taking a break would be like resetting your computer so that it can start afresh, or de-fragmenting the data so that all the information is in order.

This is a great thing because it allows you to solve problems you were unable to solve previously, by seeing it differently; if you are able to organize your thoughts properly, you will be able to take in new information more easily.

There have even been studies about methods of saving time and staying proficient, and taking breaks is one of the leading factors.

According to Christine Hohlbaum, the author of The Power of Slow: 101 Ways to Save Time in Our 24/7 World, eating lunch away from your work area every day will greatly increase your productivity. Eating in your work area will give you the illusion that you are working, but whether you like it or not, your brain will begin to wander and think of something else and then you will be working tirelessly with no progress.

It’s important to take breaks before and during work too: if you come to work in a rush because you woke up late, your mind will not be mentally prepared for the day ahead, and you will spend the first 10 to 15 minutes trying to get organized and composed before you can actually start working.

Advertising

Instead, you should try to wake up 20 minutes earlier than the time it would take you to “just get” to work. Take that time to stare off into space and not worry about anything.

If you do this, your brain will be empty and ready for all the challenges it has coming for the next few hours.

If your employer only allows a set amount of breaks during the workday, that doesn’t mean you can’t just get up and walk around for a quick break every now and then.

Even if it’s only 5 minutes, it will refresh your brain and you will gain renewed energy to do your job.

Learn more about The Importance of Scheduling Downtime.

2. Pace yourself and balance your workload

One problem that most people run into is that they underestimate the amount of work they have to do, and end up doing 50% of the work in the last 20% of the time they have to do it. This is due to an issue of balancing one’s workload.

When you receive a project, or are doing a job you normally do, take some time to really plan out your work schedule.

Consider how much time it took you to do this last time; determine how you can break the project into smaller parts and which can only be accomplished on certain days, and whether anything might come up that could interfere with your plan.

All of these questions are important for starting on a project, and when answered, they will help you stay productive throughout each day.

Advertising

For example, if you needed to design a project to map out the amount of aid offered in various regions after Hurricane Sandy, you can break it up as follows:

You will need to know what organizations are offering help to begin with, how much aid those organizations gave or plan to give, which regions were hit by Sandy, and which regions suffered the greatest losses.

You start this project on a Thursday and know you have until Tuesday to gather this information.

In order to stay productive, you need to plan out your work week—now you know you can find out which organizations are involved in helping the Hurricane Sandy Victims any day since that information is online, but gathering information on the organizations may require you to call them.

Since phone calls can only be done during week days, you have to plan on gathering all of that information before the weekend comes.

That is just one example of a situation in which pre-planning your project will help you stay productive; had you researched the affected regions first, you would not have received the info on the organizations until the weekend, and may have missed your chance to call them.

That, in turn, would have wasted time you could have spent working on this project to finish it.

Knowing what you need to do, when you can do it, and how long it will take you, is important in balancing your workload and being more productive and efficient.

3. Put your work first

This is an issue that usually occurs with young people who are new to the workforce: they’re often tempted with offers to go out at midday, and then come back lost in thought and unfocused on their work-related tasks.

Advertising

While it is important to take breaks, your breaks should consist of you clearing your mind, not loading it up with other less important information—like sports.

However, that is not the only situation where you need to worry about putting your work first before all else.

In a work environment, the senior employees will oftentimes push some of their menial tasks onto the newer employees. If you fall into that category, you need to know that their work is not your work, so if you have tasks that need to be done, you need to do it first.

If you are a new employee, you must learn to say no to other people even when it means you may not be in their good graces anymore. You can help others out once your work is done, but you are paid to do your own work, not anyone else’s.

4. Don’t open your browser unless you need them

In this day and age, everyone is constantly monitoring their social network. This is a major pain point for companies, which is why many don’t allow employees to access their social networks on company workstations.

When you are at work, disconnect the internet from your phone and keep your browsers closed so you’re not tempted to log onto your social media accounts or browse any sites that are not work-related.

If you keep your browsers closed and phone tucked away, only to be used in an emergency, you will find yourself being a more productive employee right away. 

5. Try to be happy and optimistic

If you always have a negative outlook on life, you will be more distracted and less motivated to get work done, so it’s important for you to start your day off right.

This can be done by having a good breakfast or by taking time in the morning to watch one of your favorite TV shows before work.

Advertising

If you are happy, you will find yourself able to work much more productively as your mind won’t wander into worrying about something else.

Also, if you stay optimistic and keep telling yourself that you can do whatever you set your mind to, the tasks will seem much less daunting and will go by much more quickly.

Take a look at more effective ways to stay positive at work:

15 Ways To Stay Positive At Work

Happiness and optimism are the keys to being a productive and happy employee.

All in all, heed the five tips above and you will find yourself being one of the most productive people at your company.

While you do not need to master them all, each and every one of them will help you become a better and more efficient employee.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Read Next