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Last Updated on January 10, 2018

11 Reasons Why You Should Never Get a Full-Time Job

11 Reasons Why You Should Never Get a Full-Time Job

Full-time work is the default setting in our society, but that doesn’t make it your best option.

Surrounded by examples of successful businesses whose founders worked 80 hour weeks to make it happen, most people never fully explore the possibilities of being a part-timer. What’s stopping you: the money? The status? The fear of failure?

Whatever it is, take a deep breath and keep reading. Once you’ve checked out these 11 reasons, you might decide it’s in your best interest never to get a full-time job. Ever.

1. You Don’t Need to Work Full Time

Nobody truly needs to work 40+ hours per week. If you could work fewer hours without reducing your income, you’d take that option, right? You don’t need a specific number of hours’ work per week; you need a specific amount of income to live on. And there are ways to hit that target without long hours:

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  • work fewer hours at a higher rate of pay
  • become your own boss and set your own prices
  • create semi-passive income streams

2. You’ll Save Money

Working a full-time job means you barely have time to enjoy the money you earn, yet somehow it still gets spent.

Remember that specific amount of income you need? Given the choice between working full-time or cutting your discretionary spending, you’ll find ways to trim down your expenses! Avoiding full-time work is an effective motivator to get you budget-hacking like a boss. You might save even more money if working part-time or becoming your own boss means you spend less on transport, food, or childcare.

3. You’ll Be Healthier

If you reduce the stress of your job by choosing something with shorter work hours and greater flexibility, your body will thank you for it. You’ll notice improvements in your immune system, digestion, circulation, and other key signs of physical health compared to an exhausted full-time worker.

4. You’ll Eat Better

It’s easy to grab a ready-made sandwich or a sweet snack when you’re working, but you often don’t realise how fast all those choices add up to a big pile of junky, pre-processed crap. And if you’re a high-caffeine type who guzzles cola, coffee or tea while you work, you’ll suffer the after-effects right through until after bedtime.

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For a part-time worker, the “employee diet” has less of an effect because you have more time to buy and prepare healthy, fresh food.

5. You’ll Have More Energy

The better general health and diet of a part-time worker means that you’ll have a lot more energy than if you worked full-time. Instead of arriving home weary from a full day’s work, you’ll have more time to rest your body and mind, so that when the next day arrives you’re ready to meet it head-on and get stuff done.

6. You’ll Learn More

If you’re lucky, a full-time job comes with a few training opportunities. But if you want to learn something that isn’t included in your employer’s list of training courses, then you’ll have to learn it on your own time. Ha! Time to yourself is a precious rarity if you’re a full-time employee.

Stick to part-time jobs or self-employment and you’ll always have time to learn new things that make life even more awesome. Plus your brain will be less frazzled and more receptive to fresh knowledge.

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7. You’ll Get Creative

Along with better learning performance, part-timers and entrepreneurs often report that their creative thinking improved when they quit their full-time jobs.

Granted, this could simply mean that creative people are more likely to follow a part-time career path. It gives you the creative freedom you crave and lets you avoid the burnout that plagues creatives in high-pressure full-time jobs, but it’s also likely that having more time off work gives your brain greater opportunity to make the connections that spark creative insight.

8. You Can Diversify

There’s no rule that says you have to stick to one job at a time. Instead of working full-time at one thing, why not run two or three different part-time jobs in parallel? You’ll be less likely to get bored or stuck in inflexible ways of thinking.

Having the time to develop diverse projects also protects you from losing everything the way you could if your full-time job disappears in budget cuts and corporate re-shuffling.

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9. You’ll Worry Less

Thinking about work when you’re not working means one of two things: either you really love your job, or it’s getting you down.

Full-time work doesn’t only stress your body; it stresses your mind, too. For example, worrying about work during your time off disturbs your sleep more than almost any other work-related factor. You’re much more likely to fret about work all evening if you’ve done nothing but work all day, so skip the full-time job and you can skip the worry, too.

10. You’ll Live Longer

This shouldn’t come as a big surprise. Less stress, better food, more sleep… of course you’ll live longer. Overwork is a killer, and the longer the hours you work, the more it cuts your life expectancy.

11. You’ll Be More Productive

It sounds counter-intuitive, but it’s true. Spending less time working actually makes you more productive.

This is the “working on vacation” effect: when you’ve got a short amount of time to spend on work (and something fun to look forward to when it’s done) you’ll focus better, work faster and make fewer mistakes. Win!

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Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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