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Do You Want To Stay Hidden On Facebook? Read This.

Do You Want To Stay Hidden On Facebook? Read This.

Privacy isn’t a given anymore. As more and more of our lives get uploaded to the Internet, it becomes more and more important to take all the steps we can to maintain our privacy in any way we can.

Of particular concern is our level of privacy on the number one social network, Facebook. People are increasingly eager to become invisible on Facebook in wake of highly publicized hacks and scandals. So look no further for a guide to how to make yourself invisible on Facebook, or at least as close to it as you can get.

Settings

    To become invisible, first you need to get to your Facebook Settings. Once you’re signed in, just click on the upper right hand corner and press Settings, as demonstrated above. That will get you to your Settings menu, where you will be able to become invisible on Facebook.

    Privacy

      The ‘Privacy’ settings are, of course, an important page in regards to staying invisible on Facebook. Look at the image above to see everything you can edit. They are:

      1. Who can see your future posts?

      This is the big one. Edit this to choose who you share your posts with. You have the option for everyone to see your posts, for only friends to see your post, for only your family to see your posts, or even have your posts only accessible to you.

      2. Review posts friends tag you in before they appear on your timeline

      Worried an embarrassing picture of you or quote from you will reach your page for all to see? Stop friends from tagging here.

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      3. Limit the audience for old posts on your timeline?

      You have the option to restrict who can see your past updates, either entirely or on a post-by-post basis.

      4. Who can send you friend requests?

      Can anyone send you friend requests, or just friends of friends? You decide, but you would probably prefer the latter if you want to be invisible on Facebook.

      5. Whose messages do I want filtered into my Inbox?

      Don’t want to get messages from people you’re not friends with on Facebook? This is the setting you want to tinker with.

      6. Who can look you up using the email address you provided?

      Choose between friends, friends of friends and everyone.

      7. Who can look you up using the phone number you provided?

      The same goes here as for above.

      8. Do you want other search engines to link to your timeline?

      This one’s self-explanatory if you want to stay hidden!

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      Timeline

        Next go to the ‘Timeline and Tagging’ preferences.

        9. Who can post on your timeline?

        Choose from either you and friends or just you.

        10. Review posts friends tag you in before they appear on your timeline?

        This is a really effective way to stay invisible on Facebook.

        11. Who can see posts you’ve been tagged in on your timeline?

        Everyone, friends of friends, friends, only you or customize your settings? To be invisible on Facebook you’d probably tend towards the tail end of that list.

        12. Who can see what others post on your timeline?

        Same as above.

        13. Review tags people add to your own posts before the tags appear on Facebook?

        You can choose whether or not people need your permission to add friends to the conversation in your post.

        14. When you’re tagged in a post, who do you want to add to the audience if they aren’t already in it?

        Friends, only you or custom.

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        15. Who sees tag suggestions when photos that look like you are uploaded?

        One of the creepier elements of the social network is how it will suggest friends tag you in photos that it thinks are of you. Select ‘No One’ to be more invisible on Facebook.

        Follower

          Now the ‘Followers’ setting.

          16. Who can follow me?

          If you let everyone follow you, you are doing almost the exact opposite of being invisible on Facebook. Make sure your friends are the only ones who can be your followers.

          Apps

            Next the ‘Apps’ setting.

            17. Apps, Websites and Plugins

            You can disable all third-party connections to Facebook, but this is a drastic measure to stay invisible on Facebook.

            18. Instant Personalization

            Do you want to see what your friends are doing, or do you prefer to respect their privacy? Choose here.

            19. Apps Others Use

            This determines what information others can share with you with their app use.

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            20. Old Versions of Facebook for Mobile

            Adjust Facebook privacy for people using old school apps.

            Screen Capture_2

              Lastly, the ‘Ads’ section.

              21. Third Party Sites

              Facebook doesn’t give others the right to use your name or picture in ads, but that might not always be true. Make sure that your privacy is protected by selecting ‘No one.’

              22. Ads and Friends

              Want your friends to know you liked Target’s Facebook page? If not, disable social action here.

              That’s it! Hopefully it assists you with staying invisible on Facebook.

              Featured photo credit: mkhmarketing via flickr.com

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              Matt OKeefe

              Freelance Writer, Marketer

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              Last Updated on February 15, 2019

              7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

              7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

              Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

              Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

              Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

              So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

              Joe’s Goals

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                Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                Daytum

                  Daytum

                  is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                  Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                  Excel or Numbers

                    If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                    What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                    Evernote

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                      I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                      Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                      Access or Bento

                        If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                        Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                        You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                        Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                        All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                        Conclusion

                        I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                        What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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