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7 Tablet Hacks That Will Make You Leave Your Laptop at Home

7 Tablet Hacks That Will Make You Leave Your Laptop at Home

Tablets have come a long way in recent years. Once marketed as entertainment-only devices, technological advances have narrowed the separation between work and play. A tablet may not be as functional as your laptop out of the box, but a few tweaks and accessories can transform it into a work-worthy device. Here are seven tablet hacks that will make you leave your laptop at home:

1. Print Wirelessly from Your Tablet

Printing from your tablet isn’t as intuitive as you’d hope. With a desktop or laptop, you just plug in your cable, install your driver, and you’re good to go. On a tablet, however, you must connect wirelessly to a network printer.

Cloud Print by Google makes this easier by walking you through the steps. Just go to your Chrome settings, select “Advanced Settings,” and click on “Cloud Printing.” Follow the instructions to connect a regular printer or select a cloud-ready wireless printer, and you’ll be able to access your printer from any device that’s running Chrome.

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2. Expand Your Storage into the Cloud

Most tablets come with 32 or 64 GB of storage space. With this capacity, you can store a few documents, photos, and videos, but power users expect more storage for their dollar. Thumb drives and SD cards can expand your options a bit, but cloud storage is necessary for projects and programs that require a lot of space.

Google Drive, Dropbox, and Amazon Cloud all offer free cloud storage options. These companies also have paid services for premium capacity. Google offers 100 GB of space for $5 per month — a bargain for having all your important files accessible on any device connected to Wi-Fi.

3. Manage Your Files Like a Boss

Organizing your files can be a nightmare, but creating order out of chaos is a necessary reality. With tablets, it’s all too easy to forget about organization. The default file management services provided by iOS and Android aren’t much help.

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Solid Explorer Unlocker for Android is a great choice for seamlessly organizing your desktop to intuitively navigate your files. With a little initial time and preparation, you’ll have quick access to your files when you need them.

4. Type Faster with Third-Party Keyboards

Apple’s iOS typing interface has long annoyed tech-heads. The locked QWERTY interface and lack of customization options have been met with worldwide chagrin. Android’s default layout doesn’t fare much better, but did you know you can download different keyboards? There are dozens to choose from in the Google Play store, and swapping them out is a breeze.

Thankfully, USB and wireless keyboards are available for most tablets, too. Roll-out keyboards are a nice option if you have limited storage on the go.

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5. Productivity Is the Key to Success

Microsoft Office is still not available on any tablet outside of Windows’, but that hasn’t stopped a slew of companies from releasing great alternatives.

Google’s free Quickoffice, for example, allows you to create, view, and edit Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents. Adobe released Reader on tablets, and PDF Splicer or PDF Utility allow you to create, edit, merge, and split documents on iOS or Android, respectively.

6. Put it on the Bucket List

To-do lists are necessary for nearly everyone. Notes, schedules, and calendars are great, but they need to be intuitive to actually be useful.

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Evernote is a great way to share notes and other info, and Wunderlist is fantastic for scheduling tasks and sharing them across all devices and with other people. If you’re a project manager or other business professional, you’ll appreciate the ease of use these apps provide.

7. Surf the Net

Regardless of your device, surfing the Internet can be a pain on your default browser. Chrome is a sleek and efficient browser that can be accessed across all devices and systems. It can also save all your passwords, bookmarks, history, and other settings across devices. No matter where you go, Chrome can seamlessly integrate your Internet experience.

Tablets aren’t full-on desktop replacements yet, but they’re much more powerful than netbooks and smartphones. Being productive on the go used to require carrying an Elroy Jetson bag full of gear and gadgets. Now, with just a few adjustments, you can accomplish it all with just one device.

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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