Advertising

6 Brilliant Ways To Prepare Your Gadget For The Beach This Summer

Advertising
6 Brilliant Ways To Prepare Your Gadget For The Beach This Summer

This article identifies 6 brilliant ways to prepare your gadget for the beach this summer. By following these tips you will ensure that your gadget is well looked after so that you can concentrate on having fun.

1. Know What To Take

It’s worth taking time out to think long and hard about whether you should be taking particular gadgets to the beach. Whilst there a lot of lifestyle business books that suggest you can work from the beach, taking a $1000 laptop is probably going to be more hassle than it is worth. Get sand anywhere near the inner workings or smothered all over your screen then it (and you) will not be too happy.

Smartphones and digital cameras are likely gadget for the beach candidates. This is because they enable you to capture the precious moments but also can keep you in touch with the wider world – if you want that of course. Heavy or particularly delicate devices may be not best suited to the rough and tumble of beach activities so leave these at home.

Advertising

2. Pick Your Accessories

Once you’ve decided on what to take you should have a think about the accessories that might go with it. Make sure that your accessories don’t need a dedicated source of power. They should either have their own batteries, draw from a another gadget or not need juice at all.

You might want to take a portable speaker to enable you and a few friends to listen to some tunes or simply headphones to listen alone. Whatever you pick make sure that it is going to stand up tp the rigours of being by the sea and enjoy.

3. Protect it Well

If you are taking something of value (such as a Smartphone) then it makes sense to take precautions. Keep your gadget in a protective (ideally splash proof) case and consider screen protectors for touch screens. At least this way if you have an incident with the sea or sand then you stand a better chance of not having a disaster.

Advertising

For slightly larger gadgets with a series of accessories then a dedicated carrying case is a sensible investment. The amount of accessories that you can plug into digital cameras make them perfect candidates for this type of protection.

4. Keep it Safe

As an extension of protection you should consider how you keep your gadget for the beach safe. If you are parading around using a top of the range phone and then pop it in bag whilst swimming it might attract thieves. Don’t get paranoid, instead have a plan of who is looking after what to avoid potential loses.

5. Clean It Before Hand

Before you head out make sure that your gadget is clean. This way you do not run into the temptation of trying to clean your gadget whilst idling away the hours. If you find yourself attempting to clean a gadget you may end up with issues as sand and salt are more likely to be introduced if you conduct a cleaning on the beach. By avoiding this temptation you ensure that the life expectancy of your device isn’t going to be compromised.

Advertising

6. If You Have to Clean…

Keep the cleaning to a bare minimum whilst at the beach for reasons mentioned above. But if you do happen to encounter an issue it’s best off cleaning with a very small amount of water on a paper towel. Take care not to use too much water. The water should be used to help encourage the dirt away from your gadget and not leave your gadget wet.

If you get you gadget very wet then switch it off immediately, wipe off any excess liquid with a paper towel and leave to dry. Do not use whilst it is drying out. Depending upon how wet your gadget gets depends upon how long to wait. If you’ve dropped a camera in the sea (and I hope you don’t) then you may need to wait for over a month before the water is gone. Even then there is no guarantee that your gadget will work but you may be pleasantly surprised. Just don’t try and run the gadget wet as it will definitely die.

Your Gadgets

Please get in touch if you have any further tips around how to prepare your gadget for the beach. I’d love to hear about what works well for you or if you’ve fallen foul of not being properly prepared.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Mentone Beach / Christian Haugen via flickr.com

More by this author

Less is More 10 tips for developing your writing Less Is More: 10 Writing Tips To Help You Develop Your Writing Things People With Remarkable Willpower Do Differently 10 Things People With Remarkable Willpower Do Differently gadget for the beach 6 Brilliant Ways To Prepare Your Gadget For The Beach This Summer Stop Making Excuses For Not Backing Up Your Computer Stop Making Excuses For Not Backing Up Your Computer 9 Ways to Get Into Debt How You Easily Get Into Debt

Trending in Technology

1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

Advertising
How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

    Advertising

    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

    Advertising

    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

    Advertising

    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

    Advertising

    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

    Read Next