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The Hyper Creative Entrepreneur – How to Set Yourself up for Success and Happiness

The Hyper Creative Entrepreneur – How to Set Yourself up for Success and Happiness

What do you want to be when you grow up? It sounds like a simple question, right? Well, whether you’re age 10 or age 40, that question is likely to make you feel a little uneasy if you’re a Hyper Creative entrepreneur.

Why? Because if you are a true hyper creative person, you do not know what you want to be no matter how old you are. The answer to that question for you seems to be, “Well, today I think I want to be a writer. Ask me in a week and I might say something else.”

That’s how you feel inside and if you say that out loud, then you get that look from the person asking you the question–that judgmental look which makes you feel as if there is something wrong with you because you can’t seem to settle down and just decide.

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In our society we equate mentally hopping from one passion to the next with childhood. Children are supposed to do that. They are expected to explore and discover and try a number of passions until finding the one that is right for them.  But there seems to be some unwritten rule that says adults aren’t supposed to allow our brains hop around like that. We are just supposed to know which area is right and stick with that.

But for the hyper creative adult, the idea of sticking with one thing can feel worse than a death sentence–the very thought of it can make you feel like screaming and running from the room.

It’s true that hyper creative individuals have some characteristics that appear to be similar to ADHD; however, these characteristics are not the same at all. Someone with ADHD might have problems remaining focused while someone with hyper creativity might be focused on so many things that none of them gets done well. Over a period of time this can certainly interfere with success and happiness.

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As a hyper creative person, what can you do to set yourself up for success and happiness?

This is easier than you think. The trick here is not specifically what you do, but how you do it. So the question for you is not, “What do you want to be when you grow up” but “How do I want to be when I grow up?”

So shift your thinking away from the what (that can and will change) and refocus on the how.

You can help yourself with this by making it your priority to develop your personal mental filter. You will then use this mental filter to make your business decisions. If a job offer, or client, or even your website tagline, comes through your filter with flying colors, then say yes to it. Here’s what needs to go in your filter:

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1. Will this opportunity allow me to be creative?

Let’s take the tagline as an example. If you create a website for your business and you develop a tagline, ask yourself if that tagline, what your business is going to do, will allow you to continue being creative. If it is too confining for you, you’ll ultimately end up rebelling, which will not lead to success. The last thing you want to do is develop a list of clientele who slot into your tagline so that you become known for that thing in a way that keeps you from growing. But if your tagline will continue to allow you/your business to be creative and grow, go for it.

2. Will I be able to get help with the aspects that I don’t want, like, or care to do?

OR

Is the payoff great enough that I can make myself slog through those areas?

Hyper-creatives are notorious for hating to do the middle part of tasks or jobs. The initial idea part is exhilarating, and the ending is satisfying, so when you think about tackling a project or job, be sure to think about the elements that you know you won’t be excited about doing. Then be honest with yourself about whether you know people who can do those tasks or if the paycheck or contribution to society is great enough that you’ll be able to make yourself do them even when you don’t want to.

A Note for Hyper-Creatives on Being Happy

Happiness is not something you achieve.  It is an attitude and habit. Whenever you think, “Once I do xyz I will be happy,” you are doomed to fail.

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There are many paths to being happy, but here are two techniques any hyper creative can use, right now.

1. Accept that there is nothing wrong with you. Nothing. Having a hyper-creative mind is part of who you are. The fact that others do not understand what makes you tick is not your problem. Once you stop fighting against who you are and embrace your hyper creativity as a gift and not a curse, you will be able to start using it to your advantage and you will be happier.

2. Practice kindness and make someone else happy. As they say, you can make yourself happier by making others happy. To get you started here are 21 ways to practice kindness today and instantly feel happier.

You are hyper creative. Say it loud and say it proud, because there is absolutely nothing wrong with you. Here’s to your success and happiness!

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Last Updated on January 25, 2021

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

Perfectionism sounds like a first world problem, but it stifles creative minds. Having a great idea but doubting your ability to execute it can leave you afraid to just complete and publish it. Some of the most successful inventors failed, but they kept going in pursuit of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, perfectionism can hinder people when they spend too much time seeking recognition, gathering awards and wasting time patting themselves on the back. Whatever your art, go make good art and don’t spend time worrying that your idea isn’t perfect enough and certainly don’t waste time coming up with a new idea because you’re still congratulating yourself for the last one.

1. Remember, perfection is subjective.

If you’re worried about achieving perfectionism with any single project so much that you find yourself afraid to just finish it, then you aren’t being productive. Take a hard look at your work, edit and revise, then send it our into the world. If the reviews aren’t the greatest, learn from the feedback so you can improve next time.

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2. Procrastination masquerades itself as perfectionism.

People who procrastinate aren’t always lazy or trying to get out of doing something. Many who procrastinate do so because perfectionism is killing their productivity, telling them that if they wait a better idea will come to them.

3. Recognize actions that waste time.

Artists and all creative people need time to incubate; those ideas will only grow when properly watered, but if you’re not engaging in an activity that will help foster creativity, you might just be wasting time. Remember to do everything with purpose, even relaxing.

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4. Don’t discriminate against your worth.

No one is actually perfect. We often have tremendous ideas or write things that move people emotionally, but no one attains that final state of being perfect. So, don’t get down if your second idea isn’t as good as your first—or vice versa. Perfectionists tend to be the toughest critics of their work, so don’t criticize yourself. You are not your work no matter how good or how bad.

5. Stress races your heart and freezes your innovation.

Stress is a cyclic killer that perfectionists know well because that same system that engages and causes your palms to sweat over a great idea is the same system that kicks in and worries you that you’re not good enough. Perfectionism means striving for that ultimate level, and stress can propel you forward excitedly or leave you shaking in fear of the next step.

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6. Meeting deadlines beats waiting for perfect work.

Don’t let your fear of failure prevent you from meeting your deadline. Perfection is subjective and if you’re wasting time or procrastinating, you should just finish the job and learn from any mistakes. Being productive means completing work. You shouldn’t try for months or even years to perfect one project when you can produce projects that improve over time.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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