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How to Make the Pomodoro Technique More Productive

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How to Make the Pomodoro Technique More Productive

The Pomodoro technique is a time management method developed to increase your productivity. The theory is simple: you break down your work into periods and then take short, scheduled breaks. I’ve been using this technique for a while and even if it really helped me focus on one task at a time I was missing something. Indeed, I found the Pomodoro Technique very restrictive and not user friendly. My main concern was about the “timer” which is not really friendly, but I finally found a solution—an alternative to this unkind timer: the musical timer!

The Pomodoro Technique in a Few Words

The Pomodoro Technique is really simple to understand: you work for 25 min, and then you take a 5 min break. After 4 Pomodoro slots you take a longer break. In order to work with this method, you first need to break down your to-do list into 25-minute periods. If a task is going to take you more than 25 minutes then you can set up several periods for one task (you’ll be surprised how long certain projects can take!).

Your to-do list is organized, so now you’re ready to get started. You only need a timer to set up the 25 minute slot—you can use a kitchen timer, your iPhone timer or the mobile application Pomodoro timer. This timer is here to help you focus on what you have to do. In fact, during those 25 minutes you’re not going to do anything else except the task you planned to do. Then at the end of the period the timer will ring to notify you that you can now take a break.

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The basic idea is to have a short period of time in which you’ll only focus on a single task. During this period, you’re not supposed to check your emails, open your Facebook, or respond to your phone. I found this technique really useful for two reasons:

First, it really helps you focus for 25 minutes straight. You’ll meet your objectives by telling yourself that you’re not allowed to procrastinate during a slot.

Secondly, it helps you realize how long some tasks could take… and measure the effort you put forth to complete those tasks for less than stellar results.

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The downside of this technique is that it’s really not much fun; you have your timer on your desk, and it vibrates/rings when time is over, like a school bell (it brings up so many bad memories!) So I found a new way to make this technique more fun.

My Musical Timers

I’m a music lover—I love to listen to it when I work, at home, or in my car. Most of the time, when I have a very specific task to do, I would just listen to music to isolate myself in my bubble. It feels great because I can really focus on what I need to do, and I can’t hear what people are saying around me so I don’t get distracted.

That’s how I started to use my playlists as personal Pomodoro timers. One day I was listening to a 30 min music mix I had made a few weeks before. I told myself: “Okay, you have this article to write and you’ll have until the end of the mix to write it”. It worked really well, as the music helped me focus on my task and still had a limited time to complete my task.

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From then on, I made few other mixes from 25 to 40 minutes that I would use as Pomodoro timers! No more unpleasant ringing to notify me that It was time to take a break, and I could still track the time I was spending on a task.

How do I manage my time with my musical Pomodoro timers?

This is really simple. In the morning I check my to-do list, and for that I use the collaborative task management application Azendoo. I prioritize the things I have to do and I estimate how long each task is probably going to take me. Then I select a musical mix for each task and I start working. I even add the link to my music mix in my task description so when I open it I start the music and I begin to work immediately.

When each mix is over, I’ll take a 5 minutes break (I check my emails, go grab a cup of coffee, check my Facebook, phone, etc.) and then go on to the next task and the next music mix. It really makes me much more productive because I know that I’m done when the music is over, and it’s way more pleasant than a ringtone!

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Now, I don’t really respect the 25-min slots anymore. Instead, I use mixes with different lengths and I affect them to my task according to their level of difficulty. Of course this technique is not going to work for everyone, but if you love to listen to music at work, give it a try!

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Last Updated on January 13, 2022

How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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How to Use Travel Time Effectively

Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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1. Take Your Time Getting There

As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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2. Go Gadget-Free

This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

3. Reflect and Prepare

Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

Conclusion

Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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