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Become A Clean Person This Year In 10 Steps

Become A Clean Person This Year In 10 Steps

If you are struggling to become a clean person and keeping yourself and your space in order this year, here are 10 ways to make a clean break from your old habits and become a cleaner, more organized person in 2014. Many things may affect your personal cleanliness and home, but you do not have to let it. Your mess does not own you, you own your mess.

1. Don’t Neglect Your Mental Health.

If you noticed that you abandoned cleaning or keeping up with yourself in the past year, you may choose to ask yourself if depression, fatigue, health issues, too many obligations or low self-esteem were at play. If so, you may wish to enlist the help of a loved one, confidant or trusted guide or therapist and reflect on your thinking patterns or life changes that may have affected you deeply in the previous year. Cleaning your mind is one of the first steps you can take to a more organized year and to become a clean person. You will find great empowerment in a little soul cleansing. Sometimes, we are not even aware of the impact of a certain experience on ourselves, until long after. To become a clean person, you have to take into consideration that your inside environment may be affecting what is going on around you and could be acting as a barrier.

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2. Write Down Three Cleaning Goals Every Day and Do Them.

If you are facing piles of papers, boxes, trinkets, toys, unopened mail and clothes strewn about, you may feel overwhelmed. It may seem easy to just walk away and ignore the mess until it gets bigger again and even more overwhelming.  Don’t let an already out of control mess get worse.  Take it on slowly, one step at a time.  Make a point to sit down everyday with your calendar or notepad and write a list of three things that you would like to attend to.  The list is only for you to see, so don’t feel obligated to show anyone else. Your list might include things like throwing away unused magazines, mopping the kitchen floor, clipping your toenails, organizing your purse or wallet. At the end of each day, you can take pride in having completed your tasks and if you’re up to it, add on two or more to the list.  Slow and steady wins the race and before you know it, you’re once daunting mess, will become smaller and more manageable.

3. Start Small.

Small gestures toward your goal to become a clean person are what leads to success. As the Sufis and Buddha say; “Each drop of water makes an ocean.” These simple efforts will go a long way in re-establishing your patterns and intentions for the new year. Each step is in its own way, a journey to better understanding yourself. Your small act of cleanliness might simply be taking a deep zen breath and getting in a good shower or bath, doing your laundry, washing your car, dusting your bookshelf, wiping down your computer keyboard or hanging up your clothes. As you build your cleaning prowess, you may graduate to tackling one room at a time.

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4. Decide What Products you Need to Help you Clean.

Take a look at your list of goals and see what sorts of products you will need to purchase, if you don’t already have them. You may realize you need silver cleaning cloths so you can clean your favorite time piece and organize your jewelry box, garment bags or more hangers for your closet. You may not figure out what you need until you are in the midst of cleaning.  Write them down as you go along so you’ll know what to buy the next time you go to the store.

5. Keep a Small Stock of Basic Cleaning and Grooming Needs.

Now that you have a sense of what you will need to become a clean person, you can make a small investment in keeping your items organized and in place.  Make a list of the items you need for yourself and your home and stock up at the store.  Or save some money by swapping with friends or family, check out free-cycle type community pages online where others can share and give away what they are not using or needing and you can return the favor to them, especially as you uncover all sorts of items that may have been sitting around, unused.

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6. Approach Each Task with Curiosity.

Try to remove self-judgement and stay present in your activity. Do not beat yourself up for the mess of unfolded towels or dirty dishes. Treat each activity like therapy. It’s something that’s helping you relax and allowing you to contemplate new ways to make use of the things you have. You may wish to even turn on some calming music as you clean or organize. Cleaning is a great time to think and act in silence. A mantra to encourage your desire to become a clean person, may bring you comfort, too. Whether you are cleaning yourself, your home or the dishes, it is all an act of appreciation for your little sliver of the world. Do not be surprised if you are suddenly inspired and struck with brand new ideas to approach other aspects of your life.

7. Learn to See Things for What They Are: Things.

It is very easy to accumulate a significant amount of things due to attachment and romantic thoughts associated with each piece. As you aim to become a clean person this year, you will want to assess whether the things you have are serving you positively or weighing you down emotionally. It may be affecting your productivity, ability to start a new project, or keep up with basic house chores and personal grooming. Some of your treasures inspire and uplift you.  Keep the things you cherish and display them in your home.  But also be aware of items you’re attached to simply because they’ve always been in your life or you think you ‘might need it someday.’  This type of thinking and attachment to things can create a mountain of unusable goods that just sits around and collects dust.  Learning to let go of your stuff will lead to a really profound emotional freedom within you and you’ll soon learn that you don’t need ‘things’ to make you happy.

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8. Make a Small Pile of What you Want to Keep and Let Go of the Rest.

As you go through your list of cleaning goals, you will want to pay close attention to the items you are cleaning, using, organizing and putting in order. Are there dried roses, dirty pillow cases, a weird foot massaging contraption you never used, or out of date make up? Make a few piles of those items that need to retire to the bottom of the recycling/trash bin or be donated.  This may seem harder than it is but once you remove judgement, attachment and expectation, you will find that minimizing your possessions will allow you more time and space to get creative and clean.

9. Give Yourself Time.

When starting on your cleaning goals, allow yourself enough time so you do not feel overwhelmed and rushed. If you start to feel so, stop and take inventory of what you want to do and what your time will realistically allow at that moment in your quest to become a clean person. You may want to start an alarm, if you have other pressing matters you need to attend to afterwards. Or you can set a timer to see how long certain tasks will take you, so you can better plan and schedule them throughout your week and develop them as routines. You may only get to one of the three and put off the other two for later on in the day, or another day all together, and put in its place another task that will take less of your time. That is okay. Your mere intention and action are half the battle. In the end, you can still relish in the fact that you took action and completed something. Do not feel you must accomplish everything at once.

10. Always, always make your bed. (And floss!)

Studies continue to show that those who make their bed daily are happier, feel more energized, clear-headed and able to focus better. A simple routine of making your bed can inject something positive into your day so include this in your daily routine.  Making your bed is not only for the benefit of a cleaner, more organized space but it’s also a good gift to yourself as you become a clean person, creating an inviting space for you to return to after a long day. A great book on creating lasting habits is The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. Like flossing, you will feel the difference immediately when you make your bed. And you will save money and time that might go to constantly replacing ill-cared for bed sheets or dental visits!

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Last Updated on September 17, 2018

How to Stop Multitasking and Become Way More Productive

How to Stop Multitasking and Become Way More Productive

Today we are expected to work in highly disruptive environments. We sit down at our desks, turn on our computer and immediately we are hit with hundreds of emails all vying for our attention.

Our phones are beeping and pinging with new alerts to messages, likes and comments and our colleagues are complaining about the latest company initiative is designed to get us to do more work and spend less time at home.

All these distractions result in us multitasking where our attention is switching between one crisis and the next.

Multitasking is a problem. But how to stop multitasking?

How bad really is multitasking?

It dilutes your focus and attention so even the easiest of tasks become much harder and take longer to complete.

Studies have shown that while you think you are multitasking, you are in fact task switching, which means your attention is switching between two or more pieces of work and that depletes the energy resources you have to do your work.

This is why, even though you may have done little to no physical activity, you arrive home at the end of the day feeling exhausted and not in the mood to do anything.

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We know it is not a good way to get quality work done, but the demands for out attention persist and rather than reduce, are likely to increase as the years go by.

So what to do about it?

Ways to stop multitasking and increase productivity

Now, forget about how to multitask!

Here are a few strategies on how to stop multitasking so you can get better quality and more work done in the time you have each working day:

1. Get enough rest

When you are tired, your brain has less strength to resist even the tiniest attention seeker. This is why when you find your mind wandering, it is a sign your brain is tired and time to take a break.

This does not just mean taking breaks throughout the day, it also means making sure you get enough sleep every day.

When you are well rested and take short regular breaks throughout the day your brain is fully refuelled and ready to focus in on the work that is important.

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2. Plan your day

When you don’t have a plan for the day, the day will create a plan for you. When you allow outside influences to take control of your day, it is very hard not to be dragged off in all directions.

When you have a plan for the day, when you arrive at work your brain knows exactly what it is you want to accomplish and will subconsciously have prepared itself for a sustained period of focused work.

Your resistance to distractions and other work will be high and you will focus much better on the work that needs doing.

3. Remove everything from your desk and screen except for the work you are doing

I learned this one a long time ago. In my previous work, I worked in a law office and I had case files to deal with. If I had more than one case file on my desk at any one time, I would find my eyes wandering over the other case files on my desk when I had something difficult to do.

I was looking for something easier. This meant often I was working on three or four cases at one time and that always led to mistakes and slower completion.

Now when I am working on something, I am in full-screen mode where all I can see is the work I am working on right now.

4. When at your desk, do work

We are creatures of habit. If we do our online shopping and news reading at our desks as well as our work, we will always have the temptation to be doing stuff that we should not be doing at that moment.

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Do your online shopping from another place—your home or from your phone when you are having a break—and only do your work when at your desk. This conditions your brain to focus in on your work and not other distractions.

5. Learn to say no

Whenever you hear the phrase “learn to say no,” it does not mean going about being rude to everyone. What it does mean is delay saying yes.

Most problems occur when we say “yes” immediately. We then have to spend an inordinate amount of energy thinking of ways to get ourselves out of the commitment we made.

By saying “let me think about it” or “can I let you know later” gives you time to evaluate the offer and allows you to get back to what you were doing quicker.

6. Turn off notifications on your computer

For most of us, we still use computers to do our work. When you have email alert pop-ups and other notifications turned on, they will distract you no matter how strong you feel.

Turn them off and schedule email reviewing for times between doing your focused work. Doing this will give you a lot of time back because you will be able to remain focused on the work in front of you.

7. Find a quiet place to do your most important work

Most workplaces have meeting rooms that are vacant. If you do have important work to get done, ask if you can use one of those rooms and do your work there.

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You can close the door, put on your headphones and just focus on what is important. This is a great way to remove all the other, non-important, tasks demanding your attention and just focus on one piece of work.

The bottom line

Focusing on one piece of work at a time can be hard but the benefits to the amount of work you get done are worth it. You will make fewer mistakes, you will get more done and will feel a lot less tired at the end of the day.

Make a list of the four or five things you want to get done the next day before you finish your work for the day and when you start the day, begin at the top of the list with the first item.

Don’t start anything else until you have finished the first one and then move on to the second one. This one trick will help you to become way more productive.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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