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Avoid These 10 Beliefs That Hold You Back from Success

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Avoid These 10 Beliefs That Hold You Back from Success

The number one thing holding most us back is our own headspace. We doubt ourselves on a regular basis, taking stock in limiting beliefs that prohibit us from moving forward. Here are 10 of the most limiting beliefs. Cut these from your headspace, and you will rocket toward success.

1. “I can’t be myself.”

This is one of the most damaging limiting beliefs of all. People fear that they’ll be hated for who they are, so they try to be loved for who they’re not. It doesn’t work; most people will be able to see beyond your facade and recognize that you’re faking it. Be genuine, and be genuine with the right people, to lead a happy life.

2. “I shouldn’t ask because I won’t receive.”

Whether it be asking someone out on a date or requesting a raise, you shouldn’t be afraid to ask the question. “No” is pretty much the worst thing they can say, and the more you hear the word the more tolerant you’ll become of it.

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3. “I’ll never be worth anything.”

You’re worth a lot already. There are probably people in your life that will tell you that, if you ask them. Even if you’re not where you want to be, the roadblocks stopping you from getting there are not insurmountable.

4. “My wings will melt off if I fly too close to the sun.”

Icarus be damned, you shouldn’t be afraid to reach your goal lest you fall short. The most important thing is that you try. If you fail, you learn from the experience. If you succeed, you reap the rewards of your hard work. It’s not as simple as a lose-win scenario; what you take from the experience is part of what defines it.

5. “I shouldn’t trust anyone.”

A lot of people purport that trusting in people is a foolish endeavor. That may be true if you’re on the reality competition show Survivor, but in the real world you have to put faith in others. Living without trust leaves you with a burden you can’t bear. Accept support from others, even if it means leaving yourself a little vulnerable.

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6. “Love only ends in a broken heart.”

It’s true that a lot of relationships (including romantic ones) end in heartbreak, but the heartbreak is not the only thing you take away from the experience. You created memories which, even if they’re bittersweet, will enrich your personal history and ensure that you had a life well-lived.

7. “I won’t succeed.”

You won’t succeed if you accept limiting beliefs like this as facts. Success is an abstract concept; it’s something only you can define. Define it in a way that deems you a winner when you put forth your best effort.

8. “It’s too late for me to ________.”

Don’t accept expiration dates. It’s true that you may not ever be a world-class gymnast if you’re already past 30, but it doesn’t mean you should give up on the endeavor entirely. If you have passion for the sport, go out and perform gymnastics or get involved in gymnastics in some other capacity.

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9. “I’ll implode if ________.”

A lot us fear that our universe will fall apart if something tragic happens, like the loss of a job or a death in the family. But you can, and you will, endure. Don’t forget how strong you are.

10. “I’m not normal.”

This is a true statement, but it’s still a limiting belief. No one in the world is “normal” and no one should want to be. Normal is boring. Try being interesting instead. Author Grant Morrison said,

You’ve got to remember, in the entire history of the universe, you’re the only YOU that has ever existed and ever will exist. For your little span of 70, 80, a hundred years, there’s nothing like you that’s ever existed before or since. And only you see the world the way you see the world. And we want to know how you see it. We try to tell you how we see the world, in the hope that it helps, and at the same time we want to hear what you’ve got to say, because there is nobody in existence who is YOU, and can tell the rest of us how it looks. And it might be so different and so beautiful, that it changes everything.

Got that? You’re the best you that ever existed, so just go and be you.

Featured photo credit: Jesse Hull via flickr.com

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Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on January 13, 2022

How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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How to Use Travel Time Effectively

Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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1. Take Your Time Getting There

As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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2. Go Gadget-Free

This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

3. Reflect and Prepare

Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

Conclusion

Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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