Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on June 11, 2018

35 Books on Productivity and Organizational Skills for an Effective Life

35 Books on Productivity and Organizational Skills for an Effective Life

Possessing productivity and organizational skills will give you an advantage in living a life of fulfillment and extraordinary achievements.

These skills can also help reduce stress and overwhelm by arming you with the knowledge to choose the most effective thoughts and actions to get the results you want, instead of just doing things that keep you busy without actually accomplishing anything worthwhile.

How do you begin acquiring these skills? Read, of course! But with the massive selections of books on these topics available today, choosing the right guide for you may seem overwhelming.

Don’t fret! Books have always played an important role in my family’s life and as such, I simply went through my insane collection of books (hardcover, digital, and audio) and compiled for you a list of the top 35 books to learn the most useful productivity tips and organizational skills:

1. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck

    Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford, explains that all of us possess one of two mindsets: fixed vs. growth.

    In the world of fixed traits, success is about validating yourself by proving you’re smart or talented. On the other hand, the world of growth and changing qualities is about continuously stretching yourself to learn something new. The latter empowers you to break through your self imposed limits, thrive and succeed.

    Get the book here.

    2. Eat That Frog!: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time by Brian Tracy

      This is a quick read. Brian Tracy gets right into the action and covers such things as determining priorities, delegating and eliminating tasks, knowing what’s okay to hold off for later and whether to tackle your “frog” (big task that will deliver the greatest results) first or a lower priority task.

      By regularly eating your frogs first, you develop a habit that makes it easier to accomplish more – with much less effort!

      Get the book here.

      3. The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo

        You’ll not only learn how to declutter material excess but how to clear out your personal space so you have room to surround yourself with more of what makes you happy.

        If you are like me and have the tendency to feel guilty over letting objects go, Marie Kondo will show you how to free yourself from that. After all, an organized environment breeds a calmer mind; leaving you with the freedom and energy to be more effective.

        Get the book here.

        4. The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles by Steven Pressfield

          This book shows you how to overcome obstacles of ambition and how to discipline yourself.

          Bestselling novelist Steven Pressfield identifies the resistances that every one of us face, outlines a plan to blast away the excuses we make for ourselves for not taking action, and then effectively shows how to reach the highest level of creative discipline.

          Get the book here.

          5. Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School by John Medina

            Brains Rules gives you 12 “rules” for optimal mental performance. The book includes a brief history of the brain and how it came to operate as it does. The author then explains why his principles help your brain perform better as well as provide practical ways to implement his strategies into your everyday life.

            Get the book here.

            6. The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results by Gary Keller

              This book introduces you to a simple but powerful concept where you focus your energy on just one thing at a time, achieving extraordinary results. You will learn how to cut through clutter, reduce stress and distractions, increase your energy and achieve more in less time.

              Advertising

              The author of this book, Gary Keller, is the founder of one of the nation’s great realtors, Keller-Williams.

              Get the book here.

              7. The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph by Ryan Holiday

                Ryan Holiday teaches a simple method for understanding and acting upon the challenges and setbacks life throws at us. The method centers on tactics from stoicism where no matter how unjust or tragic the situation may be, remaining calm, avoiding the victim mentality and pushing your way through is the most effective path to success.

                Get the book here.

                8. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey

                  Stephen Covey teaches you how to be more effective in the areas of relationships, awareness, spirituality and business issues; and provides you with simple to understand strategies for achievable and lasting results.

                  The 7 Habits continues to be a key resource in helping me improve my effectiveness in all areas of my life, that I picked up a copy of “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens” (written by Covey’s son, Sean) for my own teenage son.

                  Get the book here.

                  9. 10 Natural Laws of Successful Time and Life Management by Hyrum W. Smith

                    Hyrum W. Smith (creator of the “Franklin Day Planner”) teaches his time and life management system based on your values as well as what is most important in your life, making implementation of his strategies that much easier.

                    Get the book here.

                    10. The Power of Focus: What the World’s Greatest Achievers Know about The Secret to Financial Freedom & Success by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Les Hewitt

                      Excellent book that clearly shows you how to set your priorities in order. The content is rock solid with each chapter containing clear action steps to carry out.

                      Get the book here.

                      11. Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen

                        The idea is to transfer all the “to dos” floating around inside your head as well as those you’ve jotted down on sticky notes and scrap paper into an “in-box” so you can organize everything using Allen’s rules of “do it, delegate it, defer it or trash it” to get your in-box to empty.

                        This enables you to free your mind, arm you with an organized plan of action and focus on what you’re working on while reducing stress.

                        Get the book here.

                        12. Zen To Done: The Ultimate Simple Productivity System by Leo Babauta

                          “Zen To Done” offers a simplification of David Allen’s “Getting Things Done” (see #11). It’s a set of 10 habits to help you get organized, simplify your life, get things under control and actually get things done. It’s about organization and productivity through simplicity.

                          Get the book here.

                          13. Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

                            An insightful book explaining the various ways people experience states of flow (or being in the zone), how we create meaning for our experiences and what makes human day-to-day experiences enjoyable.

                            The author provides insights on how one can apply the ideas presented in the book to your own life.

                            Advertising

                            Get the book here.

                            14. The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization by Peter M. Senge

                              Peter Senge describes the five disciplines necessary for proper organization within a company including personal mastery, mental models, shared vision, team learning and system thinking.

                              The book goes into depth about the fifth discipline in particular – system thinking. The system must be looked at as a whole and the team must work towards a common goal or vision with an understanding on how to complement each other’s abilities. The concept will stimulate ideas for communicating with colleagues as well as your own family.

                              Note: This was required reading for a leadership class I was taking. While the book contains plenty of valuable material, it is long-winded and repetitive.

                              If you are prone to boredom like I am, I recommend “The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook” instead, which includes several helpful exercises to implement the key ideas in The Fifth Discipline.

                              Get the book here.

                              15. Succeed: How We Can Reach Our Goals by Heidi Grant Halvorson Ph.D

                                Dr. Halvorson applies science to the goals and struggles we all face. This engaging and often humorous book explains the best ways to frame our goals, plan for success, build willpower and take actions to reach our goals – even in the face of adversity.

                                Get the book here.

                                16. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg

                                  Charles Duhigg, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, explains the power of habits and what we can do to correct the habits that need changing; in our personal life, business and society.

                                  Get the book here.

                                  17. Getting Results the Agile Way: A Personal Results System for Work and Life by J.D. Meier

                                    This is a simple system for achieving both short and long term results in all aspects of your life. Meier’s methods are so simple that anyone can start using them immediately!

                                    Get the book here.

                                    18. The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal by Jim Loehr, Tony Schwartz

                                      Learn how to increase your energy levels through the four primary sources of energy: physical, emotional, mental and spiritual. The training system encourages the reader to define their purpose, face the truth about their energy management and to take action through positive rituals.

                                      Get the book here.

                                      19. The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It by Kelly McGonigal

                                        McGonigal effectively explains habits and procrastination and includes real world examples and exercises to put the methods into practice. The author also reveals how we make internal, illogical bargains and shows how to identify when and where this behavior is likely to take place.

                                        Get the book here.

                                        20. Ready for Anything: 52 Productivity Principles for Getting Things Done by David Allen

                                          This book contains 52 short chapters of essays on productivity, delivered in 2-5 page bite sized pieces. It helps you to understand the values behind Allen’s GTD system (see #11) and serves as inspiration to use the GTD process with more discipline.

                                          Get the book here.

                                          Advertising

                                          21. The Now Habit: A Strategic Program for Overcoming Procrastination and Enjoying Guilt-Free Play by Neil Fiore

                                            Author Neil Fiore explains that procrastination is a strategy to obtain temporary relief from the stress of starting or completing any task or decision and not a character defect or personal/moral failure. The book addresses key issues underlying procrastination to help you work on your thoughts and prepare you to overcome procrastination in your life.

                                            Get the book here.

                                            22. One Year to an Organized Life: From Your Closets to Your Finances, the Week-by-Week Guide to Getting Completely Organized for Good by Regina Leeds

                                              This book takes the guess work out of organizing. Tasks are broken down into categories (kitchen, bedroom, etc.) and assigned to do during a specific month. Each month is broken down into weeks and each week includes small assignments to be completed to avoid being overwhelmed.

                                              Not only does this system help in organizing your home, it encourages you to organize yourself mentally, emotionally and physically as well!

                                              Get the book here.

                                              23. The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawande

                                                Dr. Gawande explains that checklists are not just for simple, straightforward tasks. They help people communicate and work together more effectively.

                                                Another benefit of the checklist is that the act of creating a checklist focuses the mind on the most important areas of our tasks. The book encourages the reader to reflect on how a checklist can be used to improve their life in both personal and business environments.

                                                Get the book here.

                                                24. Ready Aim Fire!: A Practical Guide to Setting and Achieving Goals by Jim M Woods

                                                  This book takes you through a 32 day journey with practical steps to set and accomplish goals that are important to you. It includes plenty of bonus links and free resources too!

                                                  Get the book here.

                                                  25. Time Warrior: How to Defeat Procrastination, People-Pleasing, Self-Doubt, Over-Commitment, Broken Promises and Chaos by Steve Chandler

                                                  timewarrior

                                                    This is a series of short, easy to digest chapters that instill Steve Chandler’s point about how much more important “priority management” is over “time management.” I highly recommend this book if you are having difficulty managing your time, keeping promises and making the progress in life that you believe you can.

                                                    Get the book here.

                                                    26. The Productive Person: A How-To Guide Book Filled with Productivity Hacks & Daily Schedules for Entrepreneurs, Students or Anyone Struggling with Work-Life Balance by James Roper, Chandler Bolt

                                                      This book is geared toward people who make their own schedules every day (stay at home parents, self-employed, students, etc.) and feel like there isn’t enough hours in the day for all the things they want and need to do. The authors offers actionable plans for how to be more productive, including example schedules.

                                                      Get the book here.

                                                      27. 23 Anti-Procrastination Habits: How to Stop Being Lazy and Overcome Your Procrastination by S.J. Scott

                                                      81YMSTGQS2L._SL1500_

                                                        This book will show you how to create an action plan and actually get things done on time, every time! You will learn how to prioritize which tasks are worth your time and effort and which can be shelved for later. It is a highly recommended anti-procrastination and anti-laziness guidebook.

                                                        Get the book here.

                                                        28. The Desire Map: A Guide to Creating Goals with Soul by Danielle LaPorte

                                                        71u3SVoD4SL._SL1500_

                                                          Learn to clarify what is truly important to you and what you want in life. This clarity enables you to shape your life in a way that brings you genuine joy and fulfillment.

                                                          Advertising

                                                          Decision making becomes much easier because you will know if something aligns with the life you want to live and with this confidence, you will find that you no longer regret the choices you make.

                                                          Get the book here.

                                                          29. Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard by Chip Heath

                                                          Switch

                                                            This is an entertaining book packed with useful principles for successfully making changes no matter what. The concept is easy to remember and the book includes great examples and practical solutions.

                                                            Get the book here.

                                                            30. Awaken the Giant Within : How to Take Immediate Control of Your Mental, Emotional, Physical and Financial Destiny! by Tony Robbins

                                                            81KkKgd18LL

                                                              In his book, Tony Robbins gives you effective strategies and techniques for mastering your emotions, your body, relationships, finances and your life. The book is a step-by-step self mastery program with plenty of actionable advice to help you discover your true purpose, take control of your life and shape your destiny. One of my favorites!

                                                              Get the book here.

                                                              31. The One Minute To-Do List: Quickly Get Your Chaos Completely Under Control by Michael Linenberger

                                                              1001004011767995

                                                                A to-do list strategy that is simple to learn and easy to apply! Linenberger’s approach is a simple progression: start on paper then seamlessly move to your computer or smart-phone. If you want a quick and easy organization solution, this system is it.

                                                                Get the book here.

                                                                32. To-Do List Makeover: A Simple Guide to Getting the Important Things Done by S.J. Scott

                                                                910x-6vgODL._SL1500_

                                                                  Do you find yourself creating to-do lists that never gets completed? The key is to create lists that are actionable and fits into your busy life. This guide will show you how to rethink the way you manage your daily life, get clear and identify where you’ve been leaking time.

                                                                  Get the book here.

                                                                  33. 18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, and Get the Right Things Done by Peter Bregman

                                                                  18minutes

                                                                    The idea is to combat distracting interruptions by creating “productive distractions” of your own. This includes simple reminders to pause, reflect, recharge, re-calibrate and refocus – for just 18 minutes a day (5 minutes at the beginning; eight 1-minute check-ins during the day; and 5 minutes at the end).

                                                                    The book provides a variety of tools, tips and techniques intended to enhance productivity and maximize your potential.

                                                                    Get the book here.

                                                                    34. How to Be a Productivity Ninja: Worry Less, Achieve More and Love What You Do by Graham Allcott

                                                                    newbookcover654x1024

                                                                      Techniques to stay calm, get through your tasks, make the most of your time and overcome procrastination. You will also discover new methods on how to increase your personal time and declutter from an overload of information. You also get weekly and daily checklists that are very useful!

                                                                      Get the book here.

                                                                      35. The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Don Miguel Ruiz

                                                                      LWACELWACE

                                                                        Although not exactly a book on productivity or organization, it teaches simple, practical and powerful lessons to empower you to live with emotional and mental freedom. This gives you the energy and confidence to make more effective decisions and show up into your life at your best!

                                                                        Get the book here.

                                                                        So here you go, 35 powerful books on productivity and organizational skills for a more effective, fulfilling and less stressful life. Pick one, start to read it and finish it. Don’t just read through the book either. Apply the tips you’ve learned from the book in your everyday life and that’s how you really will pick up the skills!

                                                                        Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

                                                                        More by this author

                                                                        Carmen Sakurai

                                                                        Mental Declutter, Stress Management & Burnout Prevention Coach. Feeling Stuck? Overwhelmed & No Energy? Let's Talk!

                                                                        35 Books on Productivity and Organizational Skills for an Effective Life 40 Flexible Ways for Stay At Home Moms and Dads to Earn Real Money 20 Common Habits Successful People Consciously Reject 24 Signs You’re An Introvert- Not Shy 10 Compassionate Ways to Support Loved Ones Suffering from Depression

                                                                        Trending in Productivity

                                                                        1 11 Important Things to Remember When Changing Habits 2 How Your Attitude Determines Your Success 3 How to Ask for Help When You Need It Most 4 How Much Do You Need to Give Up to Start Over? 5 Is It Really Better to Step Out of Your Comfort Zone?

                                                                        Read Next

                                                                        Advertising
                                                                        Advertising
                                                                        Advertising

                                                                        Last Updated on March 21, 2019

                                                                        11 Important Things to Remember When Changing Habits

                                                                        11 Important Things to Remember When Changing Habits

                                                                        Most gurus talk about habits in a way that doesn’t help you:

                                                                        You need to push yourself more. You can’t be lazy. You need to wake up at 5 am. You need more motivation. You can never fail…blah blah “insert more gibberish here.”

                                                                        But let me share with you the unconventional truths I found out:

                                                                        To build and change habits, you don’t need motivation or wake up at 5 am. Heck, you can fail multiple times, be lazy, have no motivation and still pull it off with ease.

                                                                        It’s quite simple and easy to do, especially with the following list I’m going to show to you. But remember, Jim Rohn used to say,

                                                                        “What is simple and easy to do is also simple and easy not to do.”

                                                                        The important things to remember when changing your habits are both simple and easy, just don’t think that they don’t make any difference because they do.

                                                                        In fact, they are the only things that make a difference.

                                                                        Let’s see what those small things are, shall we?

                                                                        1. Start Small

                                                                        The biggest mistake I see people doing with habits is by going big. You don’t go big…ever. You start small with your habits.

                                                                        Want to grow a book reading habit? Don’t start reading a book a day. Start with 10 pages a day.

                                                                        Want to become a writer? Don’t start writing 10,000 words a day. Start with 300 words.

                                                                        Want to lose weight? Don’t stop eating ice cream. Eat one less ball of it.

                                                                        Whatever it is, you need to start small. Starting big always leads to failure. It has to, because it’s not sustainable.

                                                                        Start small. How small? The amount needs to be in your comfort zone. So if you think that reading 20 pages of a book is a bit too much, start with 10 or 5.

                                                                        It needs to appear easy and be easy to do.

                                                                        Do less today to do more in a year.

                                                                        2. Stay Small

                                                                        There is a notion of Kaizen which means continuous improvement. They use this notion in habits where they tell you to start with reading 1 page of a book a day and then gradually increase the amount you do over time.

                                                                        Advertising

                                                                        But the problem with this approach is the end line — where the “improvement” stops.

                                                                        If I go from reading 1 page of a book a day and gradually reach 75 and 100, when do I stop? When I reach 1 book a day? That is just absurd.

                                                                        When you start a habit, stay at it in the intensity you have decided. Don’t push yourself for more.

                                                                        I started reading 20 pages of a book a day. It’s been more than 2 years now and I’ve read 101 books in that period. There is no way I will increase the number in the future.

                                                                        Why?

                                                                        Because reading 40 to 50 books a year is enough.

                                                                        The same thing applies to every other habit out there.

                                                                        Pick a (small) number and stay at it.

                                                                        3. Bad Days Are 100 Percent Occurrence

                                                                        No matter how great you are, you will have bad days where you won’t do your habit. Period.

                                                                        There is no way of going around this. So it’s better to prepare yourself for when that happens instead of thinking that it won’t ever happen.

                                                                        What I do when I miss a day of my habit(s) is that I try to bounce back the next day while trying to do habits for both of those days.

                                                                        Example for that is if I read 20 pages of a book a day and I miss a day, the next day I will have to read 40 pages of a book. If I miss writing 500 words, the next day I need to write 1000.

                                                                        This is a really important point we will discuss later on rewards and punishments.

                                                                        This is how I prepare for the bad days when I skip my habit(s) and it’s a model you should take as well.

                                                                        4. Those Who Track It, Hack It

                                                                        When you track an activity, you can objectively tell what you did in the past days, weeks, months, and years. If you don’t track, you will for sure forget everything you did.

                                                                        There are many different ways you can track your activities today, from Habitica to a simple Excel sheet that I use, to even a Whatsapp Tracker.

                                                                        Peter Drucker said,

                                                                        “What you track is what you do.”

                                                                        So track it to do it — it really helps.

                                                                        But tracking is accompanied by one more easy activity — measuring.

                                                                        5. Measure Once, Do Twice

                                                                        Peter Drucker also said,

                                                                        “What you measure is what you improve.”

                                                                        So alongside my tracker, I have numbers with which I measure doses of daily activities:

                                                                        For reading, it’s 20 pages.
                                                                        For writing, it’s 500 words.
                                                                        For the gym, it’s 1 (I went) or 0 (didn’t go).
                                                                        For budgeting, it’s writing down the incomes and expenses.

                                                                        Tracking and measuring go hand in hand, they take less than 20 seconds a day but they create so much momentum that it’s unbelievable.

                                                                        6. All Days Make a Difference

                                                                        Will one day in the gym make you fit? It won’t.

                                                                        Will two? They won’t.

                                                                        Will three? They won’t.

                                                                        Which means that a single gym session won’t make you fit. But after 100 gym sessions, you will look and feel fit.

                                                                        What happened? Which one made you fit?

                                                                        The answer to this (Sorites paradox)[1] is that no single gym session made you fit, they all did.

                                                                        No single day makes a difference, but when combined, they all do. So trust the process and keep on going (small).

                                                                        7. They Are Never Fully Automated

                                                                        Gurus tell you that habits become automatic. And yes, some of them do, like showering a certain way of brushing your teeth.

                                                                        But some habits don’t become automatic, they become a lifestyle.

                                                                        What I mean by that is that you won’t automatically “wake up” in the gym and wonder how you got there.

                                                                        It will just become a part of your lifestyle.

                                                                        Advertising

                                                                        The difference is that you do the first one automatically, without conscious thought, while the other is a part of how you live your life.

                                                                        It’s not automatic, but it’s a decision you don’t ponder on or think about — you simply do it.

                                                                        It will become easy at a certain point, but they will never become fully automated.

                                                                        8. What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

                                                                        Marshall Goldsmith has a great book with the same title to it. The phrase means that sometimes, you will need to ditch certain habits to make room for other ones which will bring you to the next step.

                                                                        Don’t be afraid to evolve your habits when you sense that they don’t bring you where you want to go.

                                                                        When I started reading, it was about reading business and tactic books. But two years into it, I switched to philosophy books which don’t teach me anything “applicable,” but instead teach me how to think.

                                                                        The most important ability of the 21st century is the ability to learn, unlearn, and relearn. The strongest tree is the willow tree – not because it has the strongest root or biggest trunk, but because it is flexible enough to endure and sustain anything.

                                                                        Be like a willow, adapting to the new ways of doing things.

                                                                        9. Set a Goal and Then Forget It

                                                                        The most successful of us know what they want to achieve, but they don’t focus on it.

                                                                        Sounds paradoxical? You’re right, it does. But here is the logic behind it.

                                                                        You need to have a goal of doing something – “I want to become a healthy individual” – and then, you need to reverse engineer how to get there with your habits- “I will go to the gym four times a week.”

                                                                        But once you have your goal, you need to “forget” about it and only focus on the process. Because you are working on the process of becoming healthy and it’s always in the making. You will only be as healthy as you take care of your body.

                                                                        So you have a goal which isn’t static but keeps on moving.

                                                                        If you went to the gym 150 times year and you hit your goal, what would you do then? You would stop going to the gym.

                                                                        This is why goal-oriented people experience yo-yo effect[2] and why process-oriented people don’t.

                                                                        The difference between process-oriented and goal-oriented people is that the first focus on daily actions while others only focus on the reward at the finish line.

                                                                        Set a goal but then forget about it and reap massive awards.

                                                                        10. Punish Yourself

                                                                        Last two sections are pure Pavlovian – you need to punish bad behavior and reward good behavior. You are the only person who decides what is good and what is bad for you, but when you do, you need to rigorously follow that.

                                                                        Advertising

                                                                        I’ve told you in point #3 about bad days and how after one occurs, I do double the work on the next day. That is one of my forms of punishments.

                                                                        It’s the need to tell your brain that certain behaviors are unacceptable and that they lead to bad outcomes. That’s what punishments are for.

                                                                        You want to tell your brain that there are real consequences to missing your daily habits.[3]

                                                                        No favorite food to eat or favorite show to watch or going to the cinema for a new Marvel movie- none, zero, zilch.

                                                                        The brain will remember these bad feelings and will try to avoid the behaviors that led to them as much as possible.

                                                                        But don’t forget the other side of the same coin.

                                                                        11. Reward Yourself

                                                                        When you follow and execute on your plan, reward yourself. It’s how the brain knows that you did something good.

                                                                        Whenever I finish one of my habits for the day, I open my tracker (who am I kidding, I always keep it open on my desktop) and fill it with a number. As soon as I finish reading 20 pages of a book a day (or a bit more), I open the tracker and write the number down.

                                                                        The cell becomes green and gives me an instant boost of endorphin – a great success for the day. Then, it becomes all about not breaking the chain and having as many green fields as possible.

                                                                        After 100 days, I crunch some numbers and see how I did.

                                                                        If I have less than 10 cheat days, I reward myself with a great meal in a restaurant. You can create your own rewards and they can be daily, weekly, monthly or any arbitrary time table that you create.

                                                                        Primoz Bozic, a productivity coach, has gold, silver, and bronze medals as his reward system.[4]

                                                                        If you’re having problems creating a system which works for you, contact me via email and we can discuss specifics.

                                                                        In the End, It Matters

                                                                        What you do matters not only to you but to the people around you.

                                                                        When you increase the quality of your life, you indirectly increase the quality of life of people around you. And sometimes, that is all the “motivation” we need to start.

                                                                        And that’s the best quote for the end of this article:

                                                                        “Motivation gets you started, but habits keep you going.”

                                                                        Keep going.

                                                                        Advertising

                                                                        More Resources to Help You Build Habits

                                                                        Featured photo credit: Anete Lūsiņa via unsplash.com

                                                                        Reference

                                                                        [1] Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Sorites paradox
                                                                        [2] Muscle Zone: What causes yo-yo effect and how to avoid it?
                                                                        [3] Growth Habits: 5 Missteps That Cause You To Quit Building A Habit
                                                                        [4] Primoz Bozic: The Lean Review: How to Plan Your 2019 in 20 Minutes

                                                                        Read Next