Advertising
Advertising

13 Ways To Make Decision Making Less Stressful

13 Ways To Make Decision Making Less Stressful

“It is in your moments of decision that your destiny is shaped.” — Tony Robbins

Do you struggle to make decisions?

You may feel so concerned about making the wrong choice that you don’t make any choice at all. I firmly believe that but by doing this, you actually do make a decision: you decide not to choose any path or destination!  No decision is a decision.

The typical way of coming to a decision involves attempting to compare the future consequences of each of the possible actions. But really how do you know the future, how can you realistically make a decision based on “possible” outcomes?

Advertising

The first challenge lies in attempting to predict the future; it’s tough to have any real accuracy. The second challenge is that the more important and serious we believe the issue to be, the more likely we are to become paralyzed. Yet, these big issues are the ones that really require a decision and a direction.  Ultimately, making decisions this way can be difficult. Indecision can feel paralyzing.

Can there be a Better Way?

Try this on for size, see how it feels differently from the last method. Instead of looking at a long-term point in the future, try considering just the impact on your life and your well-being now – right here, right now, in the present moment.

Two simple questions to ask yourself:

  1. If I selected this option, how would it impact my life right now?
  2. What changes would I experience immediately?

An example:

Suppose you had a job that you didn’t really care for, but the money was good and you didn’t have to work very hard to get it. But you really wanted to be a teacher.  The thought of teaching middle school English always appealed to you, and you’d love having the summers available to do something other than work your usual job.

Let’s think about this a little:

If I selected this option, what impact would it have on my life right now? What changes would I experience immediately?

Advertising

  • Stay at old job: I would feel trapped. I would feel very little hope that in the future I could have an enjoyable career.
  • Become a teacher: I would feel hopeful about the future and excited at the prospect of spending my days in a more enjoyable way.

Now it is so much easier to see what option will feel better, will enhance your life and lead you to greater personal satisfaction.

Present Moment Impact

When you look only at the impact your decision making have in the present moment, you get to the heart of the matter very quickly. The very fact that you’re stuck to begin with and can’t make up your mind means that you’re having a difficult time choosing one over the other. So if there’s no obvious winner, choose the option that’s the most fulfilling to you.

By taking the future out of the equation and simply making a decision, you can move forward and spend your energy taking action to make your decision work out the very best it can. This is a much more effective and enjoyable way to live.

Additional Strategies to make decisions less stressful

  1. Let go a little. You don’t have to be the best or be perfect all of the time.
  2. Look at the big picture.  So many times we get caught up in all the small details that we really loose sight of the big picture.
  3. Take a break. Take a yoga class, go on a run or meditate. Let your mind relax and allow your subconsciousness do the work for you.
  4. Intuition. Simply go with your gut. Sometimes your first instinct is the one that will lead you in the right direction.
  5. Non-Permanent. Remember that many of our decisions are not permanent, they are just phases in our lives and things will change.
  6. Choose to live from your heart. Allowing your heart to guide you will ensure that you know you are moving forward for your greater good.

Additional Action Steps to make decisions more manageable

Checklists to free your Mind

Creating checklists for routine and everyday tasks can free your mind and lower your stress levels.  I use checklists often, it allows me to breathe easy, I’m never stressing that I am forgetting something.  Once your checklist is ready you don’t need to spend time deciding to do A or B, you will know that you will do B after you have completed A.

Advertising

Block your Time

Set aside a specific block of time for making your decision. Pick a location where you will not be disturbed.  Set a timer.  Give yourself enough time, but be careful about using too much as you will turn the session into an unproductive procrastination session.

Limit your choices

Quickly rule out choices not suitable. Pick 2-3 choices that interesting and part of your life plan or vision.  This allows to you eliminate unnecessary information overload and will help you analyze choices quicker.

Right-size, right decision

Putting the right amount of effort into your decision making will help you make faster decisions and with less stress.  Making the decision about “what’s for dinner?” and making the decision about “where to go to college?” both deserve the appropriate amount of time and effort.  Understand that smaller decisions don’t need to be made into large ones because you are feeling “stuck”.

Create a Support System

Put together a group of friends and family that can assist with the big decisions.  You could also opt to join a Mastermind group, a group of peers that can offer you an objective view and a new prospective on your decisions.

Advertising

Delegate the Small Stuff

Whether it is around the house or at the office, there are some things that you can definitely pass on to other people.  Think about the things that can easily be shifted to other family members or assistants.  Allow these people to learn the art of decision making for themselves, help prepare them for bigger decisions.

Put some or all of these strategies into practice for fighting stress while making decisions, and you will see real changes in every area of your life.   You will see the levels of stress decrease, you will see that decisions become easier to make each time.

More by this author

13 Gluten-Free Recipes That Will Make You Drool 7 Tips To Make Your Email Marketing Campaigns Management Effective 8 Tips To Make Your Email Marketing Campaign Management Effective 10 Ways to Boost Your Productivity at the Office 13 Ways To Make Decision Making Less Stressful 5 Simple and Easy Relaxation Tips

Trending in Productivity

1 How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day 2 7 Things to Remember When You’re Going Through Tough Times in Life 3 20 Productive Hobbies That Will Make You Smarter and Happier 4 Ditch Work Life Balance and Embrace Work Life Harmony 5 The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on May 24, 2019

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

1. Create a Good Morning Routine

One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

Advertising

2. Prioritize

Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

    If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

    Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

    How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

    3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

    One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

    Advertising

    Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

    Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

    Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

    And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

    4. Take Breaks

    Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

    To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

    After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

    Advertising

    I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

    5. Manage Your Time Effectively

    A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

    How do you know when exactly you have free time?

    By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

    With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

    Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

    A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

    Advertising

    20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

    6. Celebrate and Reflect

    No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

    Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

    Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

    More Articles About Daily Productivity

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Reference

    Read Next