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10 Things All Highly Successful People Do

10 Things All Highly Successful People Do

S-U-C-C-E-S-S, that’s the way spell success!

Do you find yourself often Googling motivational quotes, searching YouTube clips for inspirational graduation speeches and videos, and reading anything that Stephen Covey (Author of “7 Highly Effective Habits of Successful People”) produces?

Successful people eat, sleep, and breathe personal improvement. Because of this, success is an art and not a science. So if you don’t mind, I would like to paint you a picture of 10 characteristics of highly successful people that you must emulate right now to create the best version of you!

1. They greet every individual by their name.

Dale Carnegie, the godfather of self-improvement, interpersonal skill development, and public speaking, always emphasized that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language. Therefore take time to learn people’s names, their interests, their passions, and what’s important to them.

By simply putting a little effort into knowing people as humans and not statistics will go a long way when it’s time to rally the troops.

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2. They learn to delegate.

Being in a leadership position means you are charged with improving the present in order to ensure a prosperous future. If you are bogged down trying to do every single task your way or managing others to ensure they do it your way, you are going to burn out like a sparkler on the 4th of July.

You can find Paul Orfalea, founder of Kinko’s, constantly communicating to his team that “Busy is not a good word. It’s not a good excuse. Get it done; delegate it!” Successful people understand the value of delegating work in helping create autonomy and confidence from within others – which will pay dividends in the long run for everyone.

3. They communicate when times are good, bad, and ugly.

The Dalai Lama put it best with, “A lack of transparency results in distrust and a deep sense of insecurity.” You can’t argue with the Dalai Lama. Simply put – be transparent. Transparency, regardless of what is going on, will build trust, honesty, and respect among everyone you impact on a daily basis.

Highly successful people know that there is nothing more important in inspiring and motivating others than building trust, sharing honestly, and earning respect. Get’r done!

4. They are okay with being role models.

Albert Schweitzer, a great philosopher and humanitarian among other things, always emphasized that “Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.” Being a role model is not something you get to choose. Regardless of whether you want to be or not, you are a role model.

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So instead of worrying about having to be perfect all of the time, be authentic, humanistic, and strive to be the best version of you. Because somewhere out there, someone is watching what you do and what you say in the hopes of one day becoming the great, honest and transparent leader that is you.

5. They recognize the importance of recognizing others.

As Maya Angelou infamously put it, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Highly successful people know how invaluable public displays of recognition are with regards to empowering others. Constantly celebrate and recognize positive efforts and individual accomplishments.

Doing this illustrates that you are aware of even the small things that occur on a regular basis. And when it boils down to it, life is only about the small things. Every success is founded by a thousand small positive exchanges – one a day, every day, as often as you can.

6. They only try to be themselves.

Some of our greatest leaders are not stoic, as history would tell. Instead they are dynamic, eccentric (think Mark Cuban), zealous, and most importantly, humanistic. People relate and attach themselves to those who are authentic, energetic, and charismatic – all of which you can’t be if you are spending all of your time trying to be someone else.

Steve Jobs also said, “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.”

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7. They don’t work for their work calendar.

Mark Cuban, one of the wealthiest and busiest men in America has been repeatedly quoted saying, “Time is more valuable than money,” especially when it’s your own. Sure, highly successful people’s calendars may look like the end of a Tetris game, but that doesn’t mean their time and conversations are dictated by Outlook invites.

Instead their schedule is whatever it takes to empower others to find their own success. Success isn’t dictated by meetings, it’s created through meaningful exchanges.

8. They constantly wear everyone else’s shoes

Sir Richard Branson has gone on record numerous times stating the importance of understanding and looking for the best in your people, “I love my people, I love spending time with my people, and most importantly I love learning from my people.” Follow in his footsteps by making it a point to spend some time with your peers by placing yourself in their shoes.

By doing this you will be reminded every day how invaluable the people in your life are to your success! In Sir Richard’s mind, no job is ever below him and every job is essential to his personal and professional success.

9. They live active lives

Just think of Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. If life is an endurance sport, then success is our fuel. Becoming and staying successful is like running a marathon. In order to survive this marathon we need to fuel ourselves with the right things – people, thoughts, and experiences. As Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson says, “Success isn’t always about greatness. It’s about consistency. Consistent hard work gains success. Greatness will come.”

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Successful people not only train their minds, hearts, and will, but they train their bodies to endure the grind that is necessary to become successful too.

10. They take time to decompress

Doe Zantamata, author of the book “Karma”, accentuates through her literature that by “Taking time to do nothing will often bring everything into perspective.” Being successful takes a lot of energy, drive, and passion. No matter how centered or even-keeled we are, we are still susceptible to fatigue and burnout.

Highly successful people know how vital it is to take time for themself, re-focus, re-energize, and re-calibrate on their vision and goals. At the end of the day we are only humans doing the work of superheroes and even a superhero has a weakness.

Don’t let your lack of attention to your needs become your kryptonite. Create a great day!

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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