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10 Practical Ways to Boost Your Energy Level

10 Practical Ways to Boost Your Energy Level

Admit it: you’re tired of being tired. Whether hitting your snooze button 34,521 times or spending your day combating brain fog, your energy level is in serious limbo. You’ve often wondered if caffeine’s available in an IV drip (or if you’re anything like me, you’ve Googled it!).

You’re done with chronic fatigue and quick fixes. Your Scarlett O’Hara moment is here, and you’re not going to take it anymore! But where to begin? Glad you asked! Here are 10 practical ways to boost your energy level and get more out of your day-to-day life.

1. Take a Nap

If you’re having trouble focusing, clock out for a 20-minute power nap. Find a quiet place to lie down so you can fall asleep easily, and set an alarm so your nap doesn’t turn into a coma. Make sure to take your nap early in the afternoon – any later and you’ll have trouble falling asleep when it’s time to go to bed.

Have enough sleep already? Try the next one.

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2. Exercise

I know, I can already hear the groans. Exercise when you’re tired? Say wha?! But it’s true: in fact, studies have shown that a 10-minute walk can rev you up for up to two hours! Exercise increases blood flow to all parts of your body, increasing your energy. Just make sure to avoid exercise up to three hours before bed, or you could be in for a restless night.

You’ve been doing a lot of exercises and look for more ways? Keep reading.

3. Drink More Fluids

Dehydration can make you feel tired, so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day. You’re not limited to water; you can also drink milk, tea and liquid foods to hydrate, such as soups.

Wondering what to do while drinking? Read the next point.

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4. Listen to Music

Throwing on upbeat songs during energy lulls is a great way to not only boost your energy level, but distract you from feeling blasé during not-so-fun tasks. Music engages the body’s sympathetic nervous system, which readies you for action when you’re facing a challenge.

Music alone can’t vent your anger? Try the next suggestion.

5. Roll With the Punches

Studies have reported our minds spin through about 60,000 thoughts a day, and 50,000 of those are negative. If you find your thoughts become very Shakespearean tragedy every time you’re placed in a hectic situation, be mindful of that and get into the habit of handling them in a more positive way. Doing so will lower your cortisol level (the stress hormone), and you’ll be able to perceive productive outcomes over dreadful ones.

Feel like it’s more of a time to calm down? The next 2 ways can help!

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6. Focus on Your Breathing

When we’re going through a stressful period, our breathing can become shallow. This causes fatigue and physical stress because of the lack of oxygen in our cells. By focusing on mindful breathing, you’ll keep your body running smoothly. Check out these breathing exercises for guidance.

If you can breathe well, why not go up another level and try to meditate?

7. Meditate

One of the most popular ways to boost your energy level: meditation. It lowers your heart rate, eases tension, and gives you an endorphin burst, which increases your alertness. Do your best to take a few minutes every hour to step away from technology and simply focus on your breath.

Good breathing helps to tune up the body, so does your diet. Check out the next 2 points.

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8. Cut Back on Caffeine/Sugar

It’s obvious why we go for that afternoon coffee or dessert: it spikes our blood sugar, giving us a sudden burst of energy to get through the rest of our workday. However, your energy will crash just as quickly once your blood sugar level drops back down, leaving you feeling like you’ve been hit by a freight train. Focus on snacks that contain fruit (their natural sugars take longer to metabolize), protein, good fats (such as in almonds and walnuts), and complex carbohydrates (such as those found in whole grains).

Read on to find out what your body needs actually!

9. Take B-Vitamins

Your grogginess may have to do with not getting enough B-vitamins. Thiamin, B6, B12, and riboflavin are all part of your body’s energy production. Take a daily supplement to help offset your fatigue.

Now you know how to have control of all your internal factors, but the external world has impact on you as well. Make sure you don’t miss the last point!

10. Avoid Whiny McAlwaysComplains

There’s no bigger energy suck than people who are just exhausting to spend time with. Either they only get in touch when they want something from you, show up at your door and expect you to drop everything, or make Eeyore look like a ray of sunshine. Either cut back on communication with them, or cut them out of your life entirely.

How do you boost your energy level?

More by this author

Krissy Brady

A women's health & wellness writer with a short-term goal to leave women feeling a little more empowered and a little less verklempt.

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Last Updated on September 11, 2019

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

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  • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
  • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
  • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
  • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

Benefits of Using a To-Do List

However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

  • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
  • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
  • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
  • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
  • You feel more organized.
  • It helps you with planning.

4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

1. Categorize

Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

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2. Add Estimations

You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

3. Prioritize

To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

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  • Important and urgent
  • Not urgent but important
  • Not important but urgent
  • Not important or urgent

You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

4.  Review

To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

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Bottom Line

So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

To your success!

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Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

Reference

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