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10 Books By The Most Successful People In The World To Inspire Your Life

10 Books By The Most Successful People In The World To Inspire Your Life

We all admire those people who go for their dreams, create successful businesses, change the world and simply get rich. Luckily, some of them are kind enough to share the secrets of how they did all those things. Many successful people write books allowing people to read the stories of their failures and victories and to learn from their mistakes and achievements. These books inspire, fascinate, surprise and teach. Maybe, you will find something for you in these books written by incredibly successful people.

1. Business @ the Speed of Thought by Bill Gates

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    In the book, published in 1999, Gates predicted that in the next 10 years business would change more than in the last 50 years. Did this prediction come true? Well, yes, it did and that is a great reason to reread this book written by one of the biggest leaders of the information revolution. Modern business is a powerful system and being intelligent and intuitive is no longer enough to succeed. Bill Gates shares his knowledge about the principles of successful business and teaches how to use modern information technologies right. He provides personal examples from his business and that makes this book even more interesting to read.

    2. Buffett’s Bites: The Essential Investor’s Guide to Warren Buffett’s Shareholder Letters by Warren Buffet

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      Warren Buffet has made more than $50 billion due to successful investments. In this book, he shows his business correspondence with his partners and investors starting from 1957. His golden rule of communicating with investors is to provide the information you would want to receive yourself. Reading the letters and the tips from one of the richest people in the world is quite fascinating, isn’t it?

      3. Open Society: Reforming Global Capitalism by George Soros

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        George Soros has made more than $19 billion so far. That makes his book really worth reading. Critics call this book the manifesto of the new capitalism. In this work, Soros criticizes different social and commercial taboos as well as revises people’s attitude towards capital that rules the countries. His thoughts and ideas are very fresh, clever and unusual. Everyone who is into politics, business and social problems need to read it.

        4. Losing My Virginity: The Autobiography by Richard Branson

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          Richard Branson is a well-known British entrepreneur who owns more than 400 companies in Great Britain and is one of the richest people in the country. “Losing My Virginity” is not just a story of success and a guide of how to do business right. It is also a fun book written be an extremely successful man who once decided to live his life in the fullest. He is truly a great example to follow and a very wise man to learn from.

          5. The Art of the Deal by Donald Trump

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            Actually, this scandalous American billionaire has written 15 books so far, but you should start with his first one. The best thing about “The art of the deal” is that Tramp describes in details the strategy of creating his business with life examples and tells how exactly he has been making deals, negotiating with his partners and making the decisions. Everyone who has something to do with business has to have this book and to learn from one of the greatest businessmen in the world.

            6. The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

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              This is a legendary book written by the world-renowned politician, diplomat, inventor, scientist and author Benjamin Franklin. The book tells about the first half of the author’s life. It is especially interesting because Franklin describes the formation of his personality. Franklin was without doubt a very gifted person. All the good circumstances in his life contributed to his success and all the bad ones just trained his willpower. The events of his life show that any kind of activity and every field of knowledge can be learned by a person with an inquiring mind and active energy.

              7. How I Raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling by Frank Bettger

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                This is a story of an extraordinary American man told by himself. Frank Bettger had come a long hard way before becoming one of the most high-paid commercial agents in the world. He shares the secrets of how he managed to achieve such a success after disappointing failures. This book is a must for everyone who has to do with sales and for those who want to learn how not to give up after failing in something.

                8. My Life & Work by Henry Ford

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                  This autobiographic book of one of the most remarkable inventors and managers of the 20 century is written in the bright, energetic and inspiring manner. It contains a lot of material that has a historical value yet it is still of current importance for modern economists, engineers, designers, sociologists and managers. This book is not just an interesting story about the “father” of the US car industry. It shows the practical experience of the foundation of the biggest car factory of that time.

                  9. Life Without Limits: Inspiration for a Ridiculously Good Life by Nick Vujicic

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                    This is a story of life and success of a person with no arms and legs. Despite having no limbs, Nick Vujicic has a very full life: he has two college degrees, he is happily married, he writes books and even swims. This book is an inspiring and emotional story of overcoming hardships and despair, believing in yourself and being happy. Nick speaks openly about his physical and emotional sufferings and how difficult it was to find a way to accept his condition and live a full life. In this book, Nick formulates the life rules that have helped him and shares them with his readers.

                    10. Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull

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                      Ed Catmull is a co-founder and president of Pixar Studios. This book is a mixture of a guide for managing business and personal memoirs of the author. The book is perfect for managers who want to push their colleagues to new achievements, who seek originality and creativity and who want to succeed no matter what. This is a great journey to the Pixar Company where art is created.

                      Featured photo credit: Reading a book/CollegeDegrees360 via flickr.com

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                      Last Updated on July 17, 2019

                      The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

                      The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

                      What happens in our heads when we set goals?

                      Apparently a lot more than you’d think.

                      Goal setting isn’t quite so simple as deciding on the things you’d like to accomplish and working towards them.

                      According to the research of psychologists, neurologists, and other scientists, setting a goal invests ourselves into the target as if we’d already accomplished it. That is, by setting something as a goal, however small or large, however near or far in the future, a part of our brain believes that desired outcome is an essential part of who we are – setting up the conditions that drive us to work towards the goals to fulfill the brain’s self-image.

                      Apparently, the brain cannot distinguish between things we want and things we have. Neurologically, then, our brains treat the failure to achieve our goal the same way as it treats the loss of a valued possession. And up until the moment, the goal is achieved, we have failed to achieve it, setting up a constant tension that the brain seeks to resolve.

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                      Ideally, this tension is resolved by driving us towards accomplishment. In many cases, though, the brain simply responds to the loss, causing us to feel fear, anxiety, even anguish, depending on the value of the as-yet-unattained goal.

                      Love, Loss, Dopamine, and Our Dreams

                      The brains functions are carried out by a stew of chemicals called neurotransmitters. You’ve probably heard of serotonin, which plays a key role in our emotional life – most of the effective anti-depressant medications on the market are serotonin reuptake inhibitors, meaning they regulate serotonin levels in the brain leading to more stable moods.

                      Somewhat less well-known is another neurotransmitter, dopamine. Among other things, dopamine acts as a motivator, creating a sensation of pleasure when the brain is stimulated by achievement. Dopamine is also involved in maintaining attention – some forms of ADHD are linked to irregular responses to dopamine.[1]

                      So dopamine plays a key role in keeping us focused on our goals and motivating us to attain them, rewarding our attention and achievement by elevating our mood. That is, we feel good when we work towards our goals.

                      Dopamine is related to wanting – to desire. The attainment of the object of our desire releases dopamine into our brains and we feel good. Conversely, the frustration of our desires starves us of dopamine, causing anxiety and fear.

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                      One of the greatest desires is romantic love – the long-lasting, “till death do us part” kind. It’s no surprise, then, that romantic love is sustained, at least in part, through the constant flow of dopamine released in the presence – real or imagined – of our true love. Loss of romantic love cuts off that supply of dopamine, which is why it feels like you’re dying – your brain responds by triggering all sorts of anxiety-related responses.

                      Herein lies obsession, as we go to ever-increasing lengths in search of that dopamine reward. Stalking specialists warn against any kind of contact with a stalker, positive or negative, because any response at all triggers that reward mechanism. If you let the phone ring 50 times and finally pick up on the 51st ring to tell your stalker off, your stalker gets his or her reward, and learns that all s/he has to do is wait for the phone to ring 51 times.

                      Romantic love isn’t the only kind of desire that can create this kind of dopamine addiction, though – as Captain Ahab (from Moby Dick) knew well, any suitably important goal can become an obsession once the mind has established ownership.

                      The Neurology of Ownership

                      Ownership turns out to be about a lot more than just legal rights. When we own something, we invest a part of ourselves into it – it becomes an extension of ourselves.

                      In a famous experiment at Cornell University, researchers gave students school logo coffee mugs, and then offered to trade them chocolate bars for the mugs. Very few were willing to make the trade, no matter how much they professed to like chocolate. Big deal, right? Maybe they just really liked those mugs![2]

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                      But when they reversed the experiment, handing out chocolate and then offering to trade mugs for the candy, they found that now, few students were all that interested in the mugs. Apparently the key thing about the mugs or the chocolate wasn’t whether students valued whatever they had in their possession, but simply that they had it in their possession.

                      This phenomenon is called the “endowment effect”. In a nutshell, the endowment effect occurs when we take ownership of an object (or idea, or person); in becoming “ours” it becomes integrated with our sense of identity, making us reluctant to part with it (losing it is seen as a loss, which triggers that dopamine shut-off I discussed above).

                      Interestingly, researchers have found that the endowment effect doesn’t require actual ownership or even possession to come into play. In fact, it’s enough to have a reasonable expectation of future possession for us to start thinking of something as a part of us – as jilted lovers, gambling losers, and 7-year olds denied a toy at the store have all experienced.

                      The Upshot for Goal-Setters

                      So what does all this mean for would-be achievers?

                      On one hand, it’s a warning against setting unreasonable goals. The bigger the potential for positive growth a goal has, the more anxiety and stress your brain is going to create around it’s non-achievement.

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                      It also suggests that the common wisdom to limit your goals to a small number of reasonable, attainable objectives is good advice. The more goals you have, the more ends your brain thinks it “owns” and therefore the more grief and fear the absence of those ends is going to cause you.

                      On a more positive note, the fact that the brain rewards our attentiveness by releasing dopamine means that our brain is working with us to direct us to achievement. Paying attention to your goals feels good, encouraging us to spend more time doing it. This may be why outcome visualization — a favorite technique of self-help gurus involving imagining yourself having completed your objectives — has such a poor track record in clinical studies. It effectively tricks our brain into rewarding us for achieving our goals even though we haven’t done it yet!

                      But ultimately, our brain wants us to achieve our goals, so that it’s a sense of who we are that can be fulfilled. And that’s pretty good news!

                      More About Goals Setting

                      Featured photo credit: Alexa Williams via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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