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10 Books By The Most Successful People In The World To Inspire Your Life

10 Books By The Most Successful People In The World To Inspire Your Life
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We all admire those people who go for their dreams, create successful businesses, change the world and simply get rich. Luckily, some of them are kind enough to share the secrets of how they did all those things. Many successful people write books allowing people to read the stories of their failures and victories and to learn from their mistakes and achievements. These books inspire, fascinate, surprise and teach. Maybe, you will find something for you in these books written by incredibly successful people.

1. Business @ the Speed of Thought by Bill Gates

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    In the book, published in 1999, Gates predicted that in the next 10 years business would change more than in the last 50 years. Did this prediction come true? Well, yes, it did and that is a great reason to reread this book written by one of the biggest leaders of the information revolution. Modern business is a powerful system and being intelligent and intuitive is no longer enough to succeed. Bill Gates shares his knowledge about the principles of successful business and teaches how to use modern information technologies right. He provides personal examples from his business and that makes this book even more interesting to read.

    2. Buffett’s Bites: The Essential Investor’s Guide to Warren Buffett’s Shareholder Letters by Warren Buffet

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      Warren Buffet has made more than $50 billion due to successful investments. In this book, he shows his business correspondence with his partners and investors starting from 1957. His golden rule of communicating with investors is to provide the information you would want to receive yourself. Reading the letters and the tips from one of the richest people in the world is quite fascinating, isn’t it?

      3. Open Society: Reforming Global Capitalism by George Soros

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        George Soros has made more than $19 billion so far. That makes his book really worth reading. Critics call this book the manifesto of the new capitalism. In this work, Soros criticizes different social and commercial taboos as well as revises people’s attitude towards capital that rules the countries. His thoughts and ideas are very fresh, clever and unusual. Everyone who is into politics, business and social problems need to read it.

        4. Losing My Virginity: The Autobiography by Richard Branson

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          Richard Branson is a well-known British entrepreneur who owns more than 400 companies in Great Britain and is one of the richest people in the country. “Losing My Virginity” is not just a story of success and a guide of how to do business right. It is also a fun book written be an extremely successful man who once decided to live his life in the fullest. He is truly a great example to follow and a very wise man to learn from.

          5. The Art of the Deal by Donald Trump

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            Actually, this scandalous American billionaire has written 15 books so far, but you should start with his first one. The best thing about “The art of the deal” is that Tramp describes in details the strategy of creating his business with life examples and tells how exactly he has been making deals, negotiating with his partners and making the decisions. Everyone who has something to do with business has to have this book and to learn from one of the greatest businessmen in the world.

            6. The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

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              This is a legendary book written by the world-renowned politician, diplomat, inventor, scientist and author Benjamin Franklin. The book tells about the first half of the author’s life. It is especially interesting because Franklin describes the formation of his personality. Franklin was without doubt a very gifted person. All the good circumstances in his life contributed to his success and all the bad ones just trained his willpower. The events of his life show that any kind of activity and every field of knowledge can be learned by a person with an inquiring mind and active energy.

              7. How I Raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling by Frank Bettger

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                This is a story of an extraordinary American man told by himself. Frank Bettger had come a long hard way before becoming one of the most high-paid commercial agents in the world. He shares the secrets of how he managed to achieve such a success after disappointing failures. This book is a must for everyone who has to do with sales and for those who want to learn how not to give up after failing in something.

                8. My Life & Work by Henry Ford

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                  This autobiographic book of one of the most remarkable inventors and managers of the 20 century is written in the bright, energetic and inspiring manner. It contains a lot of material that has a historical value yet it is still of current importance for modern economists, engineers, designers, sociologists and managers. This book is not just an interesting story about the “father” of the US car industry. It shows the practical experience of the foundation of the biggest car factory of that time.

                  9. Life Without Limits: Inspiration for a Ridiculously Good Life by Nick Vujicic

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                    This is a story of life and success of a person with no arms and legs. Despite having no limbs, Nick Vujicic has a very full life: he has two college degrees, he is happily married, he writes books and even swims. This book is an inspiring and emotional story of overcoming hardships and despair, believing in yourself and being happy. Nick speaks openly about his physical and emotional sufferings and how difficult it was to find a way to accept his condition and live a full life. In this book, Nick formulates the life rules that have helped him and shares them with his readers.

                    10. Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull

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                      Ed Catmull is a co-founder and president of Pixar Studios. This book is a mixture of a guide for managing business and personal memoirs of the author. The book is perfect for managers who want to push their colleagues to new achievements, who seek originality and creativity and who want to succeed no matter what. This is a great journey to the Pixar Company where art is created.

                      Featured photo credit: Reading a book/CollegeDegrees360 via flickr.com

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                      1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 3 5 Values of an Effective Leader 4 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 5 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

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                      Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                      No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                      Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                      Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                      A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                      Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                      In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                      From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                      A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                      For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                      This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                      The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                      That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                      Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                      The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                      Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                      But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                      The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                      The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                      A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                      For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                      But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                      If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                      For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                      These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                      For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                      How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                      Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                      Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                      Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                      My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                      Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                      I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                      More on Building Habits

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                      Reference

                      [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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