Advertising
Advertising

10 30-Somethings Who Prove It’s Never Too Late To Succeed

10 30-Somethings Who Prove It’s Never Too Late To Succeed

In a society that is constantly forcing the clock upon us, it’s pretty easy to get to a certain age and think, “I’m never going to one of those successful people.” If you’ve thought that, or fear thinking that, don’t stress it.

Here’s 10 examples of people who, at the age of 30 or older, turned their life around into incredible success.

1. J. D. Salinger

Salinger, an American writer, was 32 when he first captivated the literary scene with The Catcher in the Rye.

He was a writer all throughout his life, but World War 2 interrupted his career. He was drafted into the army shortly after having his first piece published in the New York Times. It wasn’t until the war was over and Salinger was safely back home that his talent was finally recognized.

2. Stan Lee

Stan Lee, the face of comic books, was considering giving up the creation of comic books while in his early 30’s. As a writer for Atlas Comics, in the early 1950’s, he was dissatisfied and unfulfilled in his duties there. He had hopes of being a more prominent literary figure, and didn’t feel that comic books were going to get him there.

Luckily for Lee, and every comic book fan out there, he didn’t give up. Following the revival of the superhero archetype by DC Comics, Lee was tasked with coming up with a new superhero team for a future comic. After some urging from his wife, due to his desire to leave, Lee began to experiment with more realistic story approaches in his comic books.

After much collaboration, Lee, age 38 then, and Jack Kirby ended up producing the Fantastic Four. One of the first superhero teams of its kind, with each character possessing human flaws and issues, such as girlfriend trouble and anger problems. It immediately became a success, catapulting Stan Lee to become unforgettable in the comic book industry.

Advertising

Not bad for a guy in his late 30’s who was considering giving it up completely.

3. Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman, whom you probably know best as Severus Snape from the Harry Potter films, wasn’t in his first movie until 46. While he wasn’t necessarily unsuccessful, he definitely proves that you can drop everything and start anew and continue your success.

At 26, after leaving a successful graphic art company that he founded with friends, he was accepted to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts. After studying there for 2 years, he found himself in numerous plays. It took another 18 years for him to finally end up on the movie screen.

His perseverance and passion definitely paid off.

4. Samuel L Jackson

Samuel L Jackson. It’s a name you undoubtedly know. Likely for his role in Pulp Fiction, which actually happened to be the role that propelled him into what could be called ‘real stardom.’

What many don’t know is that Jackson was actually a drug addict, and had only left rehab 3 years prior to his role in Pulp Fiction. It would’ve been very easy for Jackson to leave rehab and simply assume that his dream of being a film star was over.

Luckily for everyone, Jackson didn’t up. At the age of 46, he started his life anew, found success and achieved his dreams.

Advertising

5. Susan Boyle

Susan Boyle was a name unheard of by almost everyone. While she’s still not exactly a superstar name now, she is at the very least a celebrity in Britain.

At the age of 47, Susan Boyle stepped out onto the stage of Britain’s Got Talent, a TV show similar to The X Factor. Much to everyone’s surprise, what came next was a truly astounding singing performance. You can watch it here.

Now she’s doing duets with some of the most famous singers on the planet. Not bad for someone who’s nearing the age of 50.

6. Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin, a name known by just about anyone that’s had to study high school biology. The father of evolution. Initially rejected by the scientific community, and told he would not amount to anything. He even wrote in his autobiography, “I was considered by all my masters and my father, a very ordinary boy, rather below the common standard of intellect.”

It was not until age 50, following a voyage on the HMS Beagle, that he published On the Origin of Species. Despite constant criticism and rejection of earlier works on the topic, he didn’t give up. He then presented On the Origin of Species with very compelling evidence. This was later accepted by science as the building blocks to understanding how humanity came to be.

7. Sir Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill, known for being the British Prime Minister. His face was a symbol of hope, courage and inspiration throughout World War II.

What people often don’t know is that he actually first came to office at the ripe age of 62. Most people would be thinking that retirement is all they’ve got left to look forward to at that age, but Churchill proves it wrong by leading a county to victory during a time of intense hardship.

Advertising

Prior to this, Churchill had indeed been a leader of the Conservative party, the Minister of Defense, leader of the Opposition, and many other roles. Even so, could he have gone on to Prime Minister had he given up? Definitely not!

8. Colonel Sanders

Harland Sanders, better known as Colonel Sanders, is the iconic face of KFC. Having gone from dead-end job to dead-end job for most of his life, which included insurance salesman and gas station attendant, it wasn’t until 62 that his famous restaurant chain began.

He was selling chicken from his roadside restaurant, during the Great Depression, when opportunity for franchising it arose. After getting attention from acclaimed food critics, which ended in very good publicity, Sanders established the first KFC franchise with Pete Harman in 1952.

It wasn’t until 3 years later, when Sanders was 65, that he began to travel around the US looking for suitable restaurants to bring into the KFC family. As they say, the rest is history.

9. A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada

This is a name unknown to many, but his movement is timeless. Prabhupada is the figure, or Guru, behind the movement known as the “Hare Krishna movement.” Which you may have come across if you were ever into The Beatles, or Harrison specifically.

Prabhupada didn’t live a life as a loser. He was in fact a very talented man, devout in his teachings and worship. Though, with that said, it was not until he was 70 (Yes, 70!) years old that his movement gained popularity. Following interactions with The Beatles and other well-known celebrities.

It just goes to show the changes you can make, even when you’re long past the retirement age.

Advertising

10. Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh sold one painting in his lifetime. Let that sink in: one of the most well-known artists on the planet, with artwork that has sold for over 100 million dollars, sold only one painting in his lifetime.

Despite his immense talent, it went unrecognized. He did work for an art dealer, Groupil & Cie, though nothing really came of it. After becoming bitter, seeing that art was treated solely as a commodity to those buying it, he left in pursuit of better things.

He went on to work as a school supply teacher, and various other odd jobs, leaving them to pursue his dream of becoming a Minister’s assistant. Then, after failing numerous entrance exams, despite studying under some of the best known names in Theology at the time, he eventually abandoned that too.

Many other events, like his cousin refusing to give him her hand in marriage, led to despair in his life. He eventually took up much smoking and drinking, all while studying under various artists, until the despair became overwhelming. He is said to have shot himself, and later died due to an untreated infection of the wound.

If only he could see the impact his artwork has had on this earth now. Here is a man that success found after he had died: if this doesn’t prove that you can be successful, it’s likely nothing will.

So don’t lose hope! Whether you’re 15 or 50, you have time to make a difference. All you have to do is set a purpose, work towards it and persevere. You can join the ranks of the successful people!

Featured photo credit: Alan Rickman via alanrickman.info

More by this author

19 Websites That Will Make You Smarter in Every Way 13 Things to Remember If You Love A Person With Anxiety 10 Tips For Making New Year’s Resolutions Come True 11 Easy Ways To Boost Your Confidence Learn to Say No To These 5 Things To Be A Lot Closer To Success

Trending in Productivity

1 How Do You Change a Habit (According to Psychology) 2 How to Change Habits When You Feel Stuck in a Rut 3 Need Journal Inspiration? 15 Journal Ideas to Kickstart 4 How to Stay Consistent and Realize Your Dreams 5 How to Take Notes: 3 Effective Note-Taking Techniques

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 25, 2020

How Do You Change a Habit (According to Psychology)

How Do You Change a Habit (According to Psychology)

Habits are hard to kill, and rightly so. They are a part and parcel of your personality traits and mold your character.

However, habits are not always something over-the-top and quirky enough to get noticed. Think of subtle habits like tapping fingers when you are nervous and humming songs while you drive. These are nothing but ingrained habits that you may not realize easily.

Just take a few minutes and think of something specific that you do all the time. You will notice how it has become a habit for you without any explicit realization. Everything you do on a daily basis starting with your morning routine, lunch preferences to exercise routines are all habits.

Habits mostly form from life experiences and certain observed behaviors, not all of them are healthy. Habitual smoking can be dangerous to your health. Similarly, a habit could also make you lose out on enjoying something to its best – like how some people just cannot stop swaying their bodies when delivering a speech.

Thus, there could be a few habits that you would want to change about yourself. But changing habits is not as easy as it seems.

In this article, you will learn why it isn’t easy to build new habits, and how to change habits.

What Makes It Hard To Change A Habit?

To want to change a particular habit means to change something very fundamental about your behavior.[1] Hence, it’s necessary to understand how habits actually form and why they are so difficult to actually get out of.

The Biology

Habits form in a place what we call the subconscious mind in our brain.[2]

Advertising

Our brains have two modes of operation. The first one is an automatic pilot kind of system that is fast and works on reflexes often. It is what we call the subconscious part. This is the part that is associated with everything that comes naturally to you.

The second mode is the conscious mode where every action and decision is well thought out and follows a controlled way of thinking.

A fine example to distinguish both would be to consider yourself learning to drive or play an instrument. For the first time you try learning, you think before every movement you make. But once you have got the hang of it, you might drive without applying much thought into it.

Both systems work together in our brains at all times. When a habit is formed, it moves from the conscious part to the subconscious making it difficult to control.

So, the key idea in deconstructing a habit is to go from the subconscious to the conscious.

Another thing you have to understand about habits is that they can be conscious or hidden.

Conscious habits are those that require active input from your side. For instance, if you stop setting your alarm in the morning, you will stop waking up at the same time.

Hidden habits, on the other hand, are habits that we do without realizing. These make up the majority of our habits and we wouldn’t even know them until someone pointed them out. So the first difficulty in breaking these habits is to actually identify them. As they are internalized, they need a lot of attention to detail for self-identification. That’s not all.

Advertising

Habits can be physical, social, and mental, energy-based and even be particular to productivity. Understanding them is necessary to know why they are difficult to break and what can be done about them.

The Psychology

Habits get engraved into our memories depending on the way we think, feel and act over a particular period of time. The procedural part of memory deals with habit formation and studies have observed that various types of conditioning of behavior could affect your habit formations.

Classical conditioning or pavlovian conditioning is when you start associating a memory with reality.[3] A dog that associates ringing bell to food will start salivating. The same external stimuli such as the sound of church bells can make a person want to pray.

Operant conditioning is when experience and the feelings associated with it form a habit.[4] By encouraging or discouraging an act, individuals could either make it a habit or stop doing it.

Observational learning is another way habits could take form. A child may start walking the same way their parent does.

What Can You Do To Change a Habit?

Sure, habits are hard to control but it is not impossible. With a few tips and hard-driven dedication, you can surely get over your nasty habits.

Here are some ways that make use of psychological findings to help you:

1. Identify Your Habits

As mentioned earlier, habits can be quite subtle and hidden from your view. You have to bring your subconscious habits to an aware state of mind. You could do it by self-observation or by asking your friends or family to point out the habit for your sake.

Advertising

2. Find out the Impact of Your Habit

Every habit produces an effect – either physical or mental. Find out what exactly it is doing to you. Does it help you relieve stress or does it give you some pain relief?

It could be anything simple. Sometimes biting your nails could be calming your nerves. Understanding the effect of a habit is necessary to control it.

3. Apply Logic

You don’t need to be force-fed with wisdom and advice to know what an unhealthy habit could do to you.

Late-night binge-watching just before an important presentation is not going to help you. Take a moment and apply your own wisdom and logic to control your seemingly nastily habits.

4. Choose an Alternative

As I said, every habit induces some feeling. So, it could be quite difficult to get over it unless you find something else that can replace it. It can be a simple non-harming new habit that you can cultivate to get over a bad habit.

Say you have the habit of banging your head hard when you are angry. That’s going to be bad for you. Instead, the next time you are angry, just take a deep breath and count to 10. Or maybe start imagining yourself on a luxury yacht. Just think of something that will work for you.

5. Remove Triggers

Get rid of items and situations that can trigger your bad habit.

Stay away from smoke breaks if you are trying to quit it. Remove all those candy bars from the fridge if you want to control your sweet cravings.

Advertising

6. Visualize Change

Our brains can be trained to forget a habit if we start visualizing the change. Serious visualization is retained and helps as a motivator in breaking the habit loop.

For instance, to replace your habit of waking up late, visualize yourself waking up early and enjoying the early morning jog every day. By continuing this, you would naturally feel better to wake up early and do your new hobby.

7. Avoid Negative Talks and Thinking

Just as how our brain is trained to accept a change in habit, continuous negative talk and thinking could hamper your efforts put into breaking a habit.

Believe you can get out of it and assert yourself the same.

Final Thoughts

Changing habits isn’t easy, so do not expect an overnight change!

Habits took a long time to form. It could take a while to completely break out of it. You will have to accept that sometimes you may falter in your efforts. Don’t let negativity seep in when it seems hard. Keep going at it slowly and steadily.

More About Changing Habits

Featured photo credit: Mel via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next