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Sometimes Money Can Buy Happiness

Sometimes Money Can Buy Happiness

“Money is not going to make you happy, but an absence of money can buy you whole lot of miseries.” -Jordan Belfort

Money can’t make you happy, but sometimes money is a good source of momentum happiness. That’s why money can buy you happiness sometimes.

Most people have really bad approach to money. It’s just paper, albeit very needy paper! However, money is paper for survival, not a thing to die for. We have to find what makes us happy and persist in it; money will come anyways, even if the thing that makes us happy is selling colorful balloons.

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Without money we are savages. We will have to go in the jungle and hunt for food, just like the old times. What this world is making us do is forcing us to work, to make money, to pay bills, to have home, and to have food for us and for our family. Without the three basic needs–food, water, and shelter–we are unable to survive as human beings.

Without hydration, a safe place, and a full stomach there will never be happiness, and that’s why money can buy us happiness.

1. Food and water

Breaking down to the smallest things that are inevitable for survival, we jump to the sources of vitamins, minerals, proteins, fats, water, and carbohydrates.

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We have lot of choices of how to digest the basic nutrients our bodies need. More paper (cash) is going to give you the freedom to buy healthier products. We have junk food ($10-25 per day) and the healthy meals ($35-65 per day) depending on the costs of the products per country.

The body functions properly and more energeticly when we inject healthy products, but those healthy products cost more. By the fact that we are energetic and we have the proper satisfaction of the basic nutrients, we are instantly happier.

Since I personally started to spend more money on food and invest in my health, I am a new and happier man. The body needs more care because we have so many things to get sick from. Our bodies cannot fight against bacteria unless we invest in the battle. Money can buy healthy food and water, which brings happiness.

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2. Luxury

Some people’s luxury is being able to rest for a day, and some people’s luxury is having one day to go hiking and inhaling the clean air, but people who enjoy living “the good life” will need an excessive number of the expensive paper.

In fact, if you enjoy in the luxury that money can buy, you will never get enough of it. Luxury has so many ways to satisfy a person, that if one enjoys in luxury, one won’t be able to experience all of it. It’s like an endless fight for satisfaction. But to be able to have that satisfaction, we must have excessive abundance of money, which is hard to come by these days.

Money can buy you happiness if you’re the type that gets satisfied from the material things such as yachts, big houses/apartments, golf clubs, Bentleys and Rolls Royce, Hublots, Champagnes (Dom Perignon), caviar and Grey Goose…the list can go for ages.

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3. The choice

I’ve came to a conclusion that money being able to buy happiness is a matter of choice. Some people believe that everything comes from money (love, power, respect, freedom of choice, fun). Others believe that money is a thing for survival and nothing more. The happiness that they strive for comes from the things that can’t be bought with money (love, the small things, the authentic friends, somone to rely on).

It’s a choice that we have to make, whether we go for the money and get all the satisfaction for the things that can be bought from money, or believe that happiness is a choice, and that choice has nothing to do with money.

There is a quote from Albert Einstein that impacts my thoughts on this subject: “If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things.” But as I said, everyone is different and the choice you have to make is yours.

Featured photo credit: Dollars An American $100 dollar bill/401(K) 2012 via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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