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How To Be Fun And Happy Even If You’re Broke

How To Be Fun And Happy Even If You’re Broke

Let’s face it, we all have different ideas of what being broke means. For most of us, having nothing left in the bank account until the next payday is usually pretty close. I’ve been broke most of my adult life but with a bunch of kids and a sled dog team, that doesn’t surprise me — or hurt my feelings anymore.

It’s hard to see celebrities on TV and think of the lives they have that we likely won’t – ever. But does it matter? Sure, there are some great rags to riches stories, but you can have as much fun and happiness being broke as not.

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Being broke is more a state of mind than an actual issue and if you start to look at it that way, you can overcome any anxiety or stress you have about being broke and have fun and be happy anyway.

Look at what you have.

Are you really broke? Like living in your car or at a homeless shelter broke? If so, it’s probably going to be harder to feel better about what you have. But if you’re not, then really look around. Is your electricity on? Do you have food in the fridge? Enough gas in the car to get to work? Clothes to wear? If so, then relax and remember that a lot of people in a lot of places in the world would consider this to be a sign of wealth. Smile because you and your family are well taken care of. And if you’re struggling to put a meal on the table, then seek out help at a local church or food bank.

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Do fun, cheap stuff.

There are lots of things you can do without needing any money. You can camp out with the kids in your backyard. You can have awesome sex without needing a dime (assuming you have a partner already). You can read a book from the library — or three. You can borrow movies from the library. Cook something awesome out of stuff you have in your pantry. Play board games. Get on with your life. You don’t need money to pursue your dreams. Find the steps you can take to getting towards your goal that don’t require money. Exercise. Exercise always makes you feel better — and you don’t need money to do it.

Don’t stress about bills.

I used to have horrible anxiety. As a teenager, I would wake up in the middle of the night freaking out in a cold sweat over algebra class homework I hadn’t done. As I got older, my stresses became the phone bill or electric bill I couldn’t pay. What I’ve learned through the years is that even if the phone gets turned off (and it has a couple of times) or the electric gets turned off (and it did once), you can’t let it take over your life. If you and your family are safe and secure with enough to eat, sometimes that has to be good enough. Be upfront with those to whom you owe money and let them know when you can pay a bill. Try and negotiate smaller payments. If you have kids, try to be normal about abnormal things. If the electricity is off – cook outside. It’s hard to not freak out when stuff like this happens, but trying to be cheerful through hard times can make them more bearable.

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Be rich in mindset.

It’s important to understand that a lot of rich people aren’t really rich. In fact, you might think that they have money simply by how they act when in fact they might be as broke as you. People who are actually wealthy (in cash) might act stressed and frazzled, proving that being rich with cash may not be the best thing for everyone. Practice being appreciative of what you have and acting rich despite your circumstances. Be grateful for small things and not miserly in spirit. People who grouse all the time about having money, not having money or how much things cost regardless of how much money they have are boring. Period.

Stop acting like a broke person and be rich in spirit. If you truly desire wealth, then work towards that but don’t miss the little opportunities to appreciate your family at the same time. Be happy with what you have no matter what your circumstances and learn to live within your means.

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Laugh more, worry less. If the electricity is off (well, then you’re probably not reading this article), then make the best of it — especially if you can’t fix it any time soon. Do what you can with what you have and be happy about it. Life is too short to grouse about money.

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Michelle Kennedy Hogan

Michelle is an explorer, editor, author of 15 books, and mom of eight.

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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