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Everyone Should Know About These Money Saving Tips from Billionaires

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Everyone Should Know About These Money Saving Tips from Billionaires

There are plenty of billionaires in this world nowadays, but exactly how they got to that level of financial comfort may surprise you. They are not all the flashy, big spenders we see on many Hollywood tv specials. In fact, many of them attribute their success to living quite frugally. Here are some of the best money saving tips from some of the world’s most wealthy people.

Michael Bloomberg
Net Worth: $34.3 Billion

Stick with what works best for you. Michael Bloomberg is well known as one of the most controversial mayors of New York City, and majority share holder of Bloomberg L.P., an international financial information company. But one thing most people don’t know about Mayor Bloomberg is the fact that for the past 10 years he has only owned two pairs of work shoes. They are both black loafers, and provide the most comfort and functionality for the billionaire. He knows that they are what works best for him and chooses to save his money for other things rather than spend a small fortune on shoes that he will never really wear.

Bill Gates
Net Worth: $79 Billion

Learn from your past mistakes. Making mistakes with money is a common occurrence in life. We all do it, but those of us who ultimately achieve financial success in life not only make those mistakes, but more importantly, they learn from them. Bill Gates, well known as one of the richest people in the world once said, “It’s fine to celebrate success, but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.”

Ingvar Kamprad
Net Worth: $53 Billion

Avoid unnecessary spending. Ingvar Kamprad, founder of IKEA, believes that some spending is just not needed even if you do have plenty of funds to blow. Like many other super wealthy individuals, he prefers to fly economy class rather than in a private jet. In his memoir, Kamprad wrote: “We don’t need flashy cars, impressive titles, uniforms or other status symbols. We rely on our strength and our will!”

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Warren Buffett
Net Worth: $66.1 Billion

Buy a home that fits your needs. Warren Buffet is the classic example of this rule. He still lives in the Omaha, Nebraska home that he bought in 1958 for a mere $31,500. Despite having billions of dollars at his disposal, Buffet finds no reason to live in an enormous mansion just because he can. Instead he is comfortable in his modest 5 bedroom stucco house located in the heart of our nation.

Oprah Winfrey
Net Worth: $2.9 Billion

Find your true passion. This simple tip has paid off big time for Oprah. She has been quoted as saying, “You become what you believe. You are where you are today in your life based on everything you have believed.” Figuring out what you love to do, and then pursuing it with everything you’ve got will often result in the greatest of life’s rewards.

Richard Branson
Net Worth: $5.1 Billion

Set goals and do everything in your power to reach them. British Billionaire and founder of the Virgin Group, Richard Branson once started out with just a list of goals. They weren’t even the most realistic ones, but he set those goals and went for them. Little did he know what his goal setting could one day achieve.

Carlos Slim Helú
Net Worth: $78.5 Billion

Start saving your money early. Carlos Slim, a Mexican businessman who was recently edged out by Bill Gates as the richest man in the world, offers one of the most important tips when it comes to enjoying financial success. Start saving your earnings as early as possible. The sooner you start saving your money and managing it properly, the better off you will be later in life no matter what kind of work you do.

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John Caudwell
Net Worth: $2.6 Billion

Use alternate modes of transportation. This English businessman has made his fortune in the mobile phone industry, but that doesn’t mean he finds it necessary to drive around in a flashy car and show off his wealth. In fact, he still enjoys walking, riding his bike and even using public transportation to get from here to there.

David Cheriton
Net Worth: $1.7 Billion

Learn what you can do yourself. David Cheriton was one of the first investors in Google and enjoys quite a nice return on his initial $100,000 investment made in 1998. Yet he refuses to go to a barber and cuts his own hair. Even this seemingly small savings can add up especially when you adopt it to other areas of your life. Just think of how much money you could be giving other people to do things that you are perfectly capable of doing yourself.

Mark Zuckerberg
Net Worth: $30 Billion

Drive a modest card. Even the founder of Facebook lives frugally in many ways. One of which is the fact that he drives a modest, $30,000 Acura, entry-level sedan. He could have any car he wanted to drive him from here to there, or a fleet of them for that matter, but instead he chooses this simple and practical vehicle.

John Donald MacArthur
Net Worth: $1 Billion at death in 1978 ($3.7 Billion Today)

Make a budget and stick to it. MacArthur, who was the sole shareholder of Bankers Life and Casualty Company of Chicago, started his business career off with one small acquisition and then built around it. Despite living in an era that was all about Hollywood glitz and glamour, MacArthur refused to buy into this craze and lived very frugally. He never owned extravagant luxuries, never had any press agents, and kept a $25,000 annual budget.

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Rose Kennedy
Net Worth: Unknown at death in 1995

Be creative and look for alternatives in spending. Rose Kennedy is most famous for being the infamous family’s matriarch, but her money saving tactics were quite surprising considering the amount of wealth the family had accumulated. Instead of buying scrap paper reams, she would wait until the end of the year and buy old desk calendars that had just worn out their usefulness. These tended to be much cheaper than the scrap paper, allowing her to save on even the littlest things.

T. Boone Pickens
Net Worth: $1 Billion

Make a shopping list and only carry the cash you need for that list. Oil mogul and billionaire, Pickens always practices one sure way to help save money; he never carries more money in his wallet than he needs. He makes a grocery list before heading to the store, only buys the items on that list, and only carries with him enough money to make that purchase. You can’t spend money you don’t have, right?

Jim Walton
Net Worth: $34.7 Billion

You don’t always need the latest and greatest. Walton, youngest son of WalMart founder Sam Walton, lives a frugal life just like his father always taught him. Despite Walton’s great fortune, he still drives a pick-up truck which is over 15 years old. He realizes that it is better to get all you can out of your vehicles rather than driving around the flashiest or most expensive one you can get your hands on.

Donald Trump
Net Worth: $3.9 Billion

Work hard. Donald Trump attributes all of his success to his work ethic. Many outsiders see Trump as “lucky” in the world of finance, but Trump says that luck comes from hard work. “If your work pays off, which it most likely will, people might say you’re just lucky. Maybe so, because you’re lucky enough to have the brains to work hard!” he says.

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Robert Kuok
Net Worth: $11.5 Billion

Seize opportunities while you can. Robert Kuok, the richest man in Malaysia, lives simply by the rules he learned from his mother, to never be greedy, never take advantage of others, and always have high morals when it comes to dealings with money.

Kuok explains that in order to become successful financially, you must be courageous and always seize opportunities as they come your way, even when others doubt your ability.

Li Ka-shing
Net Worth: $31 Billion

Live a humble life. This man’s incredible empire spans 52 countries and employs over 270,000, yet he was a school dropout. He attributes his incredible success to living a life that is humble and simple. When you are just starting out, you must teach yourself how to live off less and adapt to a lifestyle that is appropriate and not spectacular.

Jack Ma
Net Worth: $10 Billion

The customer always comes first. Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba Group and self-made billionaire, believes that customers should always be priority #1. Behind them comes employees and last in line should be shareholders. Ma believes that a person’s attitude how they live their life is more important than their abilities.

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Howard Schultz
Net Worth: $2.2 Billion

Realize that money is not everything. Howard Schultz, Chairman and CEO of Starbucks, stated that a person’s values are far more important than their net worth. He is quoted as saying, “I never wanted to be on any billionaire’s list. I never have defined myself by net worth. I always try to define myself by my values.”

Featured photo credit: Kris Krug via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

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33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

In a difficult economy, most of us are looking for ways to put more money in our pockets, but we don’t want to feel like misers. We don’t want to drastically alter our lifestyles either. We want it fast and we want it easy. Small savings can add up and big savings can feel like winning the lottery, just without all of the taxes.

Some easy ways to save money:

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  1. Online rebate sites. Many online sites offer cash back rebates and online coupons as well. MrRebates and Ebates are two I like, but there are many others.
  2. Sign up for customer rewards. Many of your favorite stores offer customer rewards on products you already buy. Take advantage.
  3. Switch to compact fluorescent bulbs. The extra cost up front is worth the energy savings later on.
  4. Turn off power strips and electronic devices when not in use.
  5. Buy a programmable thermostat. Set it to lower the heat or raise the AC when you’re not home.
  6. Make coffee at home. Those lattes and caramel macchiatos add up to quite a bit of dough over the year.
  7. Switch banks. Shop around for better interest rates, lower fees and better customer perks. Don’t forget to look for free online banking and ease of depositing and withdrawing money.
  8. Clip coupons: Saving a couple dollars here and there can start to add up. As long as you’re going to buy the products anyway, why not save money?
  9. Pack your lunch. Bring your lunch to work with you a few days a week, rather than buy it.
  10. Eat at home. We’re busier than ever, but cooking meals at home is healthier and much cheaper than take-out or going out. Plus, with all of the freezer and pre-made options, it’s almost as fast as drive-thru.
  11. Have leftovers night. Save your leftovers from a few meals and have a “leftover dinner.” It’s a free meal!
  12. Buy store brands: Many generic or store brands are actually just as good as name brands and considerably cheaper.
  13. Ditch bottled water. Drink tap water if it’s good quality, buy a filter if it’s not. Get 
      a reusable water bottle and refill it.
    • Avoid vending machines: The items are usually over-priced.
    • Take in a matinee. Afternoon movie showings are cheaper than evening times.
    • Re-examine your cable bill. Cancel extra cable or satellite channels you don’t watch. Watch the “on demand” movie purchases too.
    • Use online bill pay. Most banks offer free online bill paying. Save on stamps and checks, and avoid late fees by automating bill payment.
    • Buy frequently used items in bulk. You get a lower per item price and eliminate extra trips to the store later on.
    • Fully utilize the library. Borrowing books is much cheaper than buying them, but in addition to books, most local libraries now lend movies and games.
    • Cancel magazine/newspaper subscriptions: Re-evaluate your subscriptions. Cancel those you don’t read and consider reading some of the other publications online.
    • Get rid of your land-line. Do you really need a land-line anymore if everyone in the family has a cell phone? Alternatively, look into using VOIP or getting a cheaper plan.
    • Better fuel efficiency. Check the air pressure in your tires, keep up with proper auto maintenance, and slow down. Driving even 5MPH slower will result in better fuel mileage.
    • Increase your deductibles. Increasing the insurance deductibles on your homeowners and auto insurance policies lowers premiums significantly. Just make sure you choose a deductible that you can afford should an emergency happen.
    • Choose lunch over dinner. If you do want to dine out occasionally, go at lunchtime rather than dinnertime. Lunch prices are usually cheaper.
    • Buy used:  Whether it’s something small like a vintage dress or a video game or something big like a car or furniture, consider buying it used. You can often get “nearly new” for a fraction of the cost.
    • Stick to the list. Make a list before you go shopping and don’t buy anything that’s not on the list unless it’s a once in a lifetime, killer deal.
    • Tame the impulse. Use a self-enforced waiting period whenever you’re tempted to make an unplanned purchase. Wait for a week and see if you still want the item.
    • Don’t be afraid to ask. Ask to have fees waived, ask for a discount, ask for a lower interest rate on your credit card.
    • Repair rather than replace. You can find directions on how to fix almost anything on the internet. Do your homework, and then bring out your inner handyman.
    • Trade with your neighbors. Borrow tools or equipment that you use infrequently and swap things like babysitting with your neighbors.
    • Swap online. Use sites like PaperBack Swap to trade books, music, and movies with others online. Also, look for local community sites like Freecycle where people give away items they no longer need.
    • Cut back on the meat. Try eating a one or two meatless meals every week or cut back on the meat portions. Meat is usually the most expensive part of the meal.
    • Comparison shop: Get in the habit of checking prices before you buy. See if you can get a better price at another store or look online.

    Remember that saving money is not about being cheap or stingy; it’s about putting money into your bank account rather than giving it to someone else. There are many ways to save money, some you’ve never thought of, and some that won’t appeal or apply to you. Just pick a few of the ideas that sound doable and watch the savings add up. Save big, save small, but save wherever you can.

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    Featured photo credit: Damir Spanic via unsplash.com

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