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Everyone Should Know About These Money Saving Tips from Billionaires

Everyone Should Know About These Money Saving Tips from Billionaires

There are plenty of billionaires in this world nowadays, but exactly how they got to that level of financial comfort may surprise you. They are not all the flashy, big spenders we see on many Hollywood tv specials. In fact, many of them attribute their success to living quite frugally. Here are some of the best money saving tips from some of the world’s most wealthy people.

Michael Bloomberg
Net Worth: $34.3 Billion

Stick with what works best for you. Michael Bloomberg is well known as one of the most controversial mayors of New York City, and majority share holder of Bloomberg L.P., an international financial information company. But one thing most people don’t know about Mayor Bloomberg is the fact that for the past 10 years he has only owned two pairs of work shoes. They are both black loafers, and provide the most comfort and functionality for the billionaire. He knows that they are what works best for him and chooses to save his money for other things rather than spend a small fortune on shoes that he will never really wear.

Bill Gates
Net Worth: $79 Billion

Learn from your past mistakes. Making mistakes with money is a common occurrence in life. We all do it, but those of us who ultimately achieve financial success in life not only make those mistakes, but more importantly, they learn from them. Bill Gates, well known as one of the richest people in the world once said, “It’s fine to celebrate success, but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.”

Ingvar Kamprad
Net Worth: $53 Billion

Avoid unnecessary spending. Ingvar Kamprad, founder of IKEA, believes that some spending is just not needed even if you do have plenty of funds to blow. Like many other super wealthy individuals, he prefers to fly economy class rather than in a private jet. In his memoir, Kamprad wrote: “We don’t need flashy cars, impressive titles, uniforms or other status symbols. We rely on our strength and our will!”

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Warren Buffett
Net Worth: $66.1 Billion

Buy a home that fits your needs. Warren Buffet is the classic example of this rule. He still lives in the Omaha, Nebraska home that he bought in 1958 for a mere $31,500. Despite having billions of dollars at his disposal, Buffet finds no reason to live in an enormous mansion just because he can. Instead he is comfortable in his modest 5 bedroom stucco house located in the heart of our nation.

Oprah Winfrey
Net Worth: $2.9 Billion

Find your true passion. This simple tip has paid off big time for Oprah. She has been quoted as saying, “You become what you believe. You are where you are today in your life based on everything you have believed.” Figuring out what you love to do, and then pursuing it with everything you’ve got will often result in the greatest of life’s rewards.

Richard Branson
Net Worth: $5.1 Billion

Set goals and do everything in your power to reach them. British Billionaire and founder of the Virgin Group, Richard Branson once started out with just a list of goals. They weren’t even the most realistic ones, but he set those goals and went for them. Little did he know what his goal setting could one day achieve.

Carlos Slim Helú
Net Worth: $78.5 Billion

Start saving your money early. Carlos Slim, a Mexican businessman who was recently edged out by Bill Gates as the richest man in the world, offers one of the most important tips when it comes to enjoying financial success. Start saving your earnings as early as possible. The sooner you start saving your money and managing it properly, the better off you will be later in life no matter what kind of work you do.

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John Caudwell
Net Worth: $2.6 Billion

Use alternate modes of transportation. This English businessman has made his fortune in the mobile phone industry, but that doesn’t mean he finds it necessary to drive around in a flashy car and show off his wealth. In fact, he still enjoys walking, riding his bike and even using public transportation to get from here to there.

David Cheriton
Net Worth: $1.7 Billion

Learn what you can do yourself. David Cheriton was one of the first investors in Google and enjoys quite a nice return on his initial $100,000 investment made in 1998. Yet he refuses to go to a barber and cuts his own hair. Even this seemingly small savings can add up especially when you adopt it to other areas of your life. Just think of how much money you could be giving other people to do things that you are perfectly capable of doing yourself.

Mark Zuckerberg
Net Worth: $30 Billion

Drive a modest card. Even the founder of Facebook lives frugally in many ways. One of which is the fact that he drives a modest, $30,000 Acura, entry-level sedan. He could have any car he wanted to drive him from here to there, or a fleet of them for that matter, but instead he chooses this simple and practical vehicle.

John Donald MacArthur
Net Worth: $1 Billion at death in 1978 ($3.7 Billion Today)

Make a budget and stick to it. MacArthur, who was the sole shareholder of Bankers Life and Casualty Company of Chicago, started his business career off with one small acquisition and then built around it. Despite living in an era that was all about Hollywood glitz and glamour, MacArthur refused to buy into this craze and lived very frugally. He never owned extravagant luxuries, never had any press agents, and kept a $25,000 annual budget.

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Rose Kennedy
Net Worth: Unknown at death in 1995

Be creative and look for alternatives in spending. Rose Kennedy is most famous for being the infamous family’s matriarch, but her money saving tactics were quite surprising considering the amount of wealth the family had accumulated. Instead of buying scrap paper reams, she would wait until the end of the year and buy old desk calendars that had just worn out their usefulness. These tended to be much cheaper than the scrap paper, allowing her to save on even the littlest things.

T. Boone Pickens
Net Worth: $1 Billion

Make a shopping list and only carry the cash you need for that list. Oil mogul and billionaire, Pickens always practices one sure way to help save money; he never carries more money in his wallet than he needs. He makes a grocery list before heading to the store, only buys the items on that list, and only carries with him enough money to make that purchase. You can’t spend money you don’t have, right?

Jim Walton
Net Worth: $34.7 Billion

You don’t always need the latest and greatest. Walton, youngest son of WalMart founder Sam Walton, lives a frugal life just like his father always taught him. Despite Walton’s great fortune, he still drives a pick-up truck which is over 15 years old. He realizes that it is better to get all you can out of your vehicles rather than driving around the flashiest or most expensive one you can get your hands on.

Donald Trump
Net Worth: $3.9 Billion

Work hard. Donald Trump attributes all of his success to his work ethic. Many outsiders see Trump as “lucky” in the world of finance, but Trump says that luck comes from hard work. “If your work pays off, which it most likely will, people might say you’re just lucky. Maybe so, because you’re lucky enough to have the brains to work hard!” he says.

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Robert Kuok
Net Worth: $11.5 Billion

Seize opportunities while you can. Robert Kuok, the richest man in Malaysia, lives simply by the rules he learned from his mother, to never be greedy, never take advantage of others, and always have high morals when it comes to dealings with money.

Kuok explains that in order to become successful financially, you must be courageous and always seize opportunities as they come your way, even when others doubt your ability.

Li Ka-shing
Net Worth: $31 Billion

Live a humble life. This man’s incredible empire spans 52 countries and employs over 270,000, yet he was a school dropout. He attributes his incredible success to living a life that is humble and simple. When you are just starting out, you must teach yourself how to live off less and adapt to a lifestyle that is appropriate and not spectacular.

Jack Ma
Net Worth: $10 Billion

The customer always comes first. Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba Group and self-made billionaire, believes that customers should always be priority #1. Behind them comes employees and last in line should be shareholders. Ma believes that a person’s attitude how they live their life is more important than their abilities.

Howard Schultz
Net Worth: $2.2 Billion

Realize that money is not everything. Howard Schultz, Chairman and CEO of Starbucks, stated that a person’s values are far more important than their net worth. He is quoted as saying, “I never wanted to be on any billionaire’s list. I never have defined myself by net worth. I always try to define myself by my values.”

Featured photo credit: Kris Krug via flickr.com

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Published on November 8, 2018

How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

After a few months of hard work and dozens of phone calls later, you finally land a job opportunity.

But then, you’re asked about your salary requirements and your mind goes blank. So, you offer a lower salary believing this will increase your odds at getting hired.

Unfortunately, this is the wrong approach.

Your salary requirements can make or break your odds at getting hired. But only if you’re not prepared.

Ask for a salary too high with no room for negotiation and your potential employer will not be able to afford you. Aim too low and employers will perceive as you offering low value. The trick is to aim as high as possible while keeping both parties feel happy.

Of course, you can’t command a high price without bringing value.

The good news is that learning how to be a high-value employee is possible. You have to work on the right tasks to grow in the right areas. Here are a few tactics to negotiate your salary requirements with confidence.

1. Hack time to accomplish more than most

Do you want to get paid well for your hard work? Of course you do. I hate to break it to you, but so do most people.

With so much competition, this won’t be an easy task to achieve. That’s why you need to become a pro at time management.

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Do you know how much free time you have? Not the free time during your lunch break or after you’ve finished working at your day job. Rather, the free time when you’re looking at your phone or watching your favorite TV show.

Data from 2017 shows that Americans spend roughly 3 hours watching TV. This is time poorly spent if you’re not happy with your current lifestyle. Instead, focus on working on your goals whenever you have free time.

For example, if your commute to/from work is 1 hour, listen to an educational Podcast. If your lunch break is 30 minutes, read for 10 to 15 minutes. And if you have a busy life with only 30–60 minutes to spare after work, use this time to work on your personal goals.

Create a morning routine that will set you up for success every day. Start waking up 1 to 2 hours earlier to have more time to work on your most important tasks. Use tools like ATracker to break down which activities you’re spending the most time in.

It won’t be easy to analyze your entire day, so set boundaries. For example, if you have 4 hours of free time each day, spend at least 2 of these hours working on important tasks.

2. Set your own boundaries

Having a successful career isn’t always about the money. According to Gallup, about 70% of employees aren’t satisfied with their current jobs.[1]

Earning more money isn’t a bad thing, but choosing a higher salary over the traits that are the most important to you is. For example, if you enjoy spending time with your family, reject job offers requiring a lot of travel.

Here are some important traits to consider:

  • Work and life balance – The last thing you’d want is a job that forces you to work 60+ hours each week. Unless this is the type of environment you’d want. Understand how your potential employer emphasizes work/life balance.
  • Self-development opportunities – Having the option to grow within your company is important. Once you learn how to do your tasks well, you’ll start becoming less engaged. Choose a company that encourages employee growth.
  • Company culture – The stereotypical cubicle job where one feels miserable doesn’t have to be your fate. Not all companies are equal in culture. Take, for example, Google, who invests heavily in keeping their employees happy.[2]

These are some of the most important traits to look for in a company, but there are others. Make it your mission to rank which traits are important to you. This way you’ll stop applying to the wrong companies and stay focused on what matters to you more.

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3. Continuously invest in yourself

Investing in yourself is the best investment you can make. Cliche I know, but true nonetheless.

You’ll grow as a person and gain confidence with the value you’ll be able to bring to others. Investing in yourself doesn’t have to be expensive. For example, you can read books to expand your knowledge in different fields.

Don’t get stuck into the habit of reading without a purpose. Instead, choose books that will help you expand in a field you’re looking to grow. At the same time, don’t limit yourself to reading books in one subject–create a healthy balance.

Podcasts are also a great medium to learn new subjects from experts in different fields. The best part is they’re free and you can consume them on your commute to/from work.

Paid education makes sense if you have little to no debt. If you decide to go back to school, be sure to apply for scholarships and grants to have the least amount of debt. Regardless of which route you take to make it a habit to grow every day.

It won’t be easy, but this will work to your advantage. Most people won’t spend most of their free time investing in themselves. This will allow you to grow faster than most, and stand out from your competition.

4. Document the value you bring

Resumes are a common way companies filter employees through the hiring process. Here’s the big secret: It’s not the only way you can showcase your skills.

To request for a higher salary than most, you have to do what most are unwilling to do. Since you’re already investing in yourself, make it a habit to showcase your skills online.

A great way to do this is to create your own website. Pick your first and last name as your domain name. If this domain is already taken, get creative and choose one that makes sense.

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Here are some ideas:

  • joesmith.com
  • joeasmith.com
  • joesmithprojects.com

Nowadays, building a website is easy. Once you have your website setup, begin producing content. For example, if you a developer you can post the applications you’re building.

During your interviews, you’ll have an online reference to showcase your accomplishments. You can use your accomplishments to justify your salary requirements. Since most people don’t do this, you’ll have a higher chance of employers accepting your offer

5. Hide your salary requirements

Avoid giving you salary requirements early in the interview process.

But if you get asked early, deflect this question in a non-defensive manner. Explain to the employer that you’d like to understand your role better first. They’ll most likely agree with you; but if they don’t, give them a range.

The truth is great employers are more concerned about your skills and the value you bring to the company. They understand that a great employee is an investment, able to earn them more than their salary.

Remember that a job interview isn’t only for the employer, it’s also for you. If the employer is more interested in your salary requirements, this may not be a good sign. Use this question to gauge if the company you’re interviewing is worth working for.

6. Do just enough research

Research average salary compensation in your industry, then wing it.

Use tools like Glassdoor to research the average salary compensation for your industry. Then leverage LinkedIn’s company data that’s provided with its Pro membership. You can view a company’s employee growth and the total number of job openings.

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Use this information to make informed decisions when deciding on your salary requirements. But don’t limit yourself to the average salary range. Companies will usually pay you more for the value you have.

Big companies will often pay more than smaller ones.[3] Whatever your desired salary amount is, always ask for a higher amount. Employers will often reject your initial offer. In fact, offer a salary range that’ll give you and your employer enough room to negotiate.

7. Get compensated by your value

Asking for the salary you deserve is an art. On one end, you have to constantly invest in yourself to offer massive value. But this isn’t enough. You also have to become a great negotiator.

Imagine requesting a high salary and because you bring a lot of value, employers are willing to pay you this. Wouldn’t this be amazing?

Most settle for average because they’re not confident with what they have to offer. Most don’t invest in themselves because they’re not dedicated enough. But not you.

You know you deserve to get paid well, and you’re willing to put in the work. Yet, you won’t sacrifice your most important values over a higher salary.

The bottom line

You’ve got what it takes to succeed in your career. Invest in yourself, learn how to negotiate, and do research. The next time you’re asked about your salary requirements, you won’t fumble.

You’ll showcase your skills with confidence and get the salary you deserve. What’s holding you back now?

Featured photo credit: LinkedIn Sales Navigator via unsplash.com

Reference

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