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10 Smart Things You Can Do With Your Tax Refund

10 Smart Things You Can Do With Your Tax Refund

It’s that time of the year again and you’ve been pretty diligent with your taxes, so you find yourself with an extra $2000 on your hands and you start wondering what to spend it all on. People often get confused when they get a relatively large sum of money and end up spending a good chunk of it without really knowing where the money went.  Well, spending your tax refund might be pretty easy, but it if you want to use this money wisely I suggest you take a look at some of options listed below.

Figure standing on money

    1. Pay off school loans

    Student loans can affect your life plans and even your partner’s plans for that matter. These loans can never be discharged, even in bankruptcy, and if you delay paying, your tax refunds can be seized, wages garnished and credit ruined.  Of all the debt you may have to pay, student loans should take top priority.  For young married couples, the problem can be doubled if both have student loans. Even if you are currently single you’ll want to pay off your student loans as quickly as possible, so you can move on with your life and worry about more important things.

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    2. Enhance your child’s college fund

    It’s never too early to start thinking about the future and when it comes to giving your child the best education you can afford, it’s good to start planning well in advance. A thousand dollars can be a nice starting point and help you get the ball rolling, so to speak. Check out your state’s 529 plans.

    3. Put it in your savings account

    Putting money into a savings account allows you to have peace of mind. When faced with potential problems and emergencies you will feel a lot less stressed out if you know that there are a couple of thousand dollars sitting on your account. Major home or car repairs, injuries, or an infestation in your home can come at the worst of times ,and having that little extra money saved for rainy days will reduce your stress immensely.

    4. Focus on big ticket buys

    Instead of frittering your tax refund away on a bunch of insignificant things that will be gone or unwanted in a short time, you can focus on investing in some big items that will last,  like a new fridge, a big screen TV, a new car or even a gaming console for your kid (or yourself). These purchases are good investments since you use them every day and they will last a long time.

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    5. Take a bite out of your credit card debt

    When it comes to debt, an extra $1000-$2000 can really help you move forward and start that debt-destroying tactic you’ve been trying to implement for a while. You’ve probably already discovered that paying just the minimum every month doesn’t reduce your debt by much, if any. Paying off a smaller debt first and then moving on to the next one until everything is paid off is a sound tactic, but with this sudden boost to your funds, you can focus on high-interest debt first and take a huge chunk out of it, saving yourself hundreds or even thousands of dollars of interest in the long term.

    6. Get a better cell phone

    Technology is getting better by the day, it seems,  and staying stuck with an old phone and a mediocre plan is far from ideal. If you use your phone a lot, and most people do, a tax refund can be a great opportunity for you to upgrade to a brand new cell phone and get a cell phone plan that fits your needs. If this means that you can get rid of a land-line phone, or keeps you from needing a laptop, it can save you money in the long run.

    7. Do some house maintenanc

    There are always a lot of things that need fixing around the house, things that we usually put off because we don’t have the time and money to deal with them. A tax refund is the perfect incentive to get some of the work done. You can repaint the house, fix the plumbing, buy some new furniture, get a couple of new lamps for the living room, get a new carpet, remodel your bathroom, improve security with a sturdy front door and new windows, invest in some landscaping, buy more energy-efficient appliances, etc. Your house is probably your largest investment, and taking care of it pays off.

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    8. Invest in acquiring new skills

    Having a range of useful skills doesn’t just look good on your resume – it can help improve the quality of your life or even help you earn a bit of money on the side. If you’ve always wanted to play an instrument or sing you can join a class or go to a vocal coach. Maybe you want to invest in a defensive driving course that will greatly improve your driving skills and lower your car insurance costs.  You could take a cooking course or buy a decent camera and start learning about photography. These skills can increase your enjoyment of life, and might also increase your income.

    9. Invest in your health

    Let’s face it, most of us need to take a good hard look at ourselves and make a few changes when it comes to our health. With some extra money on your hands you can afford to,join a gym, consult with a nutritionist,  and hire a personal trainer.  Maybe you’d like to combine acquiring new skills and healthy exercise by joining a dance or martial arts class. Investing in your health also means fixing your teeth, getting a checkup at the doctor’s office and stocking up on some supplements like D3 and fish oil.

    10. Allow yourself some luxury

    Sometimes you just have to give in to urges and pamper yourself a little, especially when you have a good opportunity to do so. You can use your tax refund to go on a little romantic trip with your partner, wine and dine at some higher-class restaurants for a while, take the kids to Disneyland or anything else that allows you to live life to the fullest and recharge your batteries. This way you are investing in your mental health and strengthening the bond between you and your loved ones. The important thing is to use only a portion of your tax refund on indulgence and dedicate the rest to things that will improve your life long-term.  Finding this balance is the key to enjoying your windfall.

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    People are often tempted to go wild and start spending their tax refund willy-nilly, losing hundreds of dollars on insignificant items bought on impulse. Try to fight this temptation and look into some of the smart options listed above that will help you put that extra money to good use.

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    Ivan Dimitrijevic

    Ivan is the CEO and founder of a digital marketing company. He has years of experiences in team management, entrepreneurship and productivity.

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    Published on November 20, 2018

    The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind

    The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind

    The truth is, there are many “money saving guides” online, but most don’t cover the root issue for not saving.

    Once I’d discovered a few key factors that allowed me to save 10k in one year, I realized why most articles couldn’t help me. The problem is that even with the right strategies you can still fail to save money. You need to have the right systems in place and the right mindset.

    In this guide, I’ll cover the best ways to save money — practical yet powerful steps you can take to start saving more. It won’t be easy but with hard work, I’m confident you’ll be able to save more money–even if you’re an impulsive spender.

    Why Your Past Prevents You from Saving Money

    Are you constantly thinking about your financial mistakes?

    If so, these thoughts are holding you back from saving.

    I get it, you wish you could go back in time to avoid your financial downfalls. But dwelling over your past will only rob you from your future. Instead, reflect on your mistakes and ask yourself what lessons you can learn from them.

    It wasn’t easy for me to accept that I had accumulated thousands of dollars in credit card debt. Once I did, I started heading in the right direction. Embrace your past failures and use them as an opportunity to set new financial goals.

    For example, after accepting that you’re thousands of dollars in debt create a plan to be debt free in a year or two. This way when you’ll be at peace even when you get negative thoughts about your finances. Now you can focus more time on saving and less on your past financial mistakes.

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    How to Effortlessly Track Your Spending

    Stop manually tracking your spending.

    Leverage powerful analytic tools such as Personal Capital and these money management apps to do the work for you. This tool has worked for me and has kept me motivated to why I’m saving in the first place. Once you login to your Personal Capital dashboard, you’re able to view your net worth.

    When I’d first signed up with Personal Capital, I had a negative net worth, but this motivated me to save more. With this tool, you can also view your spending patterns, expenses, and how much money you’re saving.

    Use your net worth as your north star to saving more. Whenever you experience financial setbacks, view how far you’ve come along. Saving money is only half the battle, being consistent is the other half.

    The Truth on Why You Keep Failing

    Saving money isn’t sexy. If it was, wouldn’t everyone be doing it?

    Some people are natural savers, but most are impulsive spenders. Instead of denying that you’re an impulsive spender, embrace it.

    Don’t try to save 60 to 70% of your income if this means you’ll live a miserable life. Saving money isn’t a race but a marathon. You’re saving for retirement and for large purchases.

    If you’re currently having a hard time saving, start spending more money on nice things. This may sound counterintuitive but hear me out. Wouldn’t it be better to save $200 each month for 12 months instead of $500 for 3 months?

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    Most people run into trouble because they create budgets that set them up for failure. This system won’t work for those who are frugal, but chances are they don’t need help saving. This system is for those who can’t save money and need to be rewarded for their hard work.

    Only because you’re buying nice things doesn’t mean that you’ll save less. Here are some rules you should have in place:

    1. Save more than 50% of your available money (after expenses)
    2. Only buy nice things after saving
    3. Automate your savings with automatic bank transfers

    These are the same rules that helped me save thousands each year while buying the latest iPhone. Focus only on items that are important to you. Remember, you can afford anything but not everything.

    How to Foolproof Yourself out of Debt

    Personal finance is a game. On one end, you’re earning money; and on the to other, you’re saving. But what ends up counting in the end isn’t how much you earn but how much you save. Research shows that about 60% of Americans spend more than they save.[1]

    So how can you separate yourself from the 60%?

    By not accumulating more debt. This way you’ll have more money to save and avoid having more financial obligations. A great way to stop accumulating debt is using cash to pay for all your transactions.

    This will be challenging, depending on how reliant you are with your credit card, but it’s worth the effort. Not only will you stop accruing debt, but you’ll also be more conscious with what you buy.

    For example, you’ll think twice about purchasing a new $200 headphone despite having the cash to buy them. According to a poll conducted by The CreditCards.com, 5 out of 6 Americans are impulsive spenders.[2]

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    Telling yourself that you’ll have the discipline to not buy things won’t cut it. This is equal to having junk food in your fridge while trying to eat healthy–it’s only a matter of time before you slip. By using cash to make your purchases, you’ll spend less and save more.

    A Proven Formula to Skyrocket Your Savings

    Having proven systems in place to help you save more is important, but they’re not the best way to save money.

    You can search for dozens of ways to save money, but there’ll always be a limit. Instead of spending the majority of your effort saving, look for ways to increase your income. The truth is that once you have the right systems in place, saving is easy.

    What’s challenging is earning more money. There are many routes you can take to achieve this. For example, you can work long and hard at your current job to earn a raise. But there’s one problem–you’re depending on someone else to give you a raise.

    Your company will have to have the budget, and you’ll have to know how to toot your own horn to get this raise. This isn’t to say that earning a raise is impossible, but things are better when you’re in control right? That’s why building a side-hustle is the best way to increase your income.

    Think of your side-hustle as a part-time job doing something you enjoy. You can sell items on eBay for a profit, or design websites for small businesses. Building a side-hustle will be on the hardest things you’ll do, be too stubborn to quit.

    During the early stages, you won’t be making money and that’s okay. Since you already have a source of income, you won’t be dependent on your side-hustle to pay for your expenses. Depending on how much time you invest in your side-hustle, it can one day replace your current income.

    Whatever route you take, focus more on earning and save as much as possible. You have more control than you give yourself credit for.

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    Transform Yourself into a Saving Money Machine

    Saving money isn’t complicated but it’s one of the hardest things you’ll do.

    By learning from your mistakes and rewarding yourself after saving you’ll save more. What would you do with an extra $200 or $500 each month? To some, this is life-changing money that can improve the quality of their lives.

    The truth is saving money is an art. Save too much and you’ll quit, but save too little and you’ll pay for the consequences in the future. Saving money takes effort and having the right systems in place.

    Imagine if you’d started saving an extra $100 this next month? Or, saved $20K in one year? Although it’s hard to imagine, this can be your reality if you follow the principles covered in this guide.

    Take a moment to brainstorm which goals you’d be able to reach if you had extra money each month. Use these goals as motivation to help you stay on track on your journey to saving more. If I was able to save thousands of dollars with little guidance, imagine what you’ll be able to do.

    What are you waiting for? Go and start saving money, the sky is your limit.

    Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

    Reference

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