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10 Money Mistakes Successful People Don’t Make

10 Money Mistakes Successful People Don’t Make

Managing money effectively is a key success skill. Successful people make the decision to become effective with money, many of them early in life. Like any area of life, it is important to educate yourself about the threats and challenges in the world. Taking the time to master a few key principles will pay off for years to come.

1. They don’t overspend; they live on less than they make.

Living on less than you make is an essential money management skill. Some of the world’s wealthiest people have taken this principle to heart. For example, Sir John Templeton, a legendary investor who became a billionaire, saved 50% of his income even when he grew up with limited means. If that is more than you manage, don’t worry! You can reach financial success by saving 10-15% of your income.

Tip: Learning to live on less than you earn takes time. Start by looking for ways to save money: 55 Practical Ways To Save Money Efficiently.

2. They don’t fixate on price; they understand the importance of value.

The price you pay for an investment, a meal or piece of clothing is only part of the story. Successful people also think about the value of that good. For investments, they consider the prospects for the investment growing in the future. For personal items, they look for high quality products that will last. For example, a well made pair of business shoes may cost $200 or more but these shoes can last for years with proper care.

Tip: Buy high quality products that will last for a long time.

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3. They don’t waste cash on fees and interest; they know how to manage their banking

Carrying a balance on your credit card is incredibly expensive and sadly common. According to CNN, the average American household carried over $15,000 in credit card debt. Successful people also keep an eye on their bank fees–how much they pay for ATM use and other transactions. These fees are easy to avoid with planning once you understand how the system works. Simply reviewing your financial accounts for 5-10 minutes each month is all it takes to understand your fees.

Discover: 7 Essential Ways To Avoid Unnecessary Bank Charges.

4. They don’t forget to adjust their finances after big changes in life.

Did you get married recently? Is your spouse referenced in your will? These are some of the points that financially successful people manage effectively. While you can automate a great deal of your finances, it is vital to make adjustments when your life and family circumstances change significantly. Sitting down by yourself (or with a financial expert) at least once a year to review your life and financial plan is an excellent way to stay on top of important changes.

Learn: Arrange your finances for the long term with estate planning.

5. They are not satisfied with a stagnant income; they look for ways to increase their income.

Some people never ask for more money or simply settle for 1-3% increases. Unfortunately, that rate of income growth means you are simply standing still–inflation is slowly eating away at your purchasing power. Instead, successful people look for ways to earn more income. Increased income gives you more options for personal enjoyment, more capacity to give money, and a sense of security.

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Successful people take daily action to increase their income. For example, they take a course to improve their skills or they contribute ideas to improve the productivity of their companies. They also know how to ask for more money.

Tip: Do yourself a favor and learn about high paying fields: earn $100,000 in project management and discover the highest paid jobs in America.

6. They don’t ignore financial statements.

Reaching financial success requires some slow and steady habits. That includes forming a habit to monitor your financial statements. Successful people set a time each month–30 to 60 minutes–to review all of their financial accounts: investments, bank accounts, credit cards and more. When they detect an error or omission, they take immediate action.

Tip: Set a recurring reminder in your calendar each month to review your financial accounts.

7. They don’t take foolish risks in money.

Warren Buffet is often quoted as saying, “Rule number one is never lose money.” All investments carry some measure of risk (and therefore the potential to lose money). That said, successful people use two powerful tools to avoid losses. They understand the value of insurance to control risk (e.g. home, auto, and life insurance) and the importance of asset allocation.

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Remember: If it sounds too good to be true (or if you don’t understand how it works), slow down and start asking plenty of questions.

8. They don’t pretend to understand everything when it comes to money.

The world is a vast and complex place–successful people know and deeply understand this truth. When it comes to money, there is a lot of information out there. That’s why successful people like Warren Buffet understand their limits and focus on their strengths.

Tip: Review your knowledge of money and investments. If you are just starting out, read one or two classic personal finance books. Or read 9 Can’t-Miss Secrets Behind Warren Buffett’s Wealth for more insights from one of the world’s most successful investors.

9. They don’t transfer responsibility to experts.

Successful people do seek out the advice of experts, yet they never yield responsibility. For example, it is reasonable to seek advice from a tax accountant in planning your financial affairs. However, successful people take the time to ask questions and evaluate the person providing advice to them.

Tip: When seeking advice from professionals like accountants and lawyers, ask questions and seek to have the advice explained to you. Otherwise, it is difficult to act on the advice.

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10. They don’t let the pursuit of money overcome other values.

Seeking financial success is a valid goal. Significant financial resources give you more options to give to causes you believe in. It also means improved access to technology, health care and leisure. However, successful people understand that financial success is only one aspect of a successful life. For example, neglecting health in the pursuit of money is a poor strategy.

Tip: Review your personal goals to see if you have a balance between financial goals, career goals, family goals and other activities.

Featured photo credit: Money/martaposemuckel via pixabay.com

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Bruce Harpham

Bruce Harpham is a Project Management Professional and Founder and CEO of Project Management Hacks.

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Last Updated on April 3, 2019

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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6. Get Aggressive About It

Consider these points:

Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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Finally (and most importantly)…

8. Keep Trying

Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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