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If You’re Wondering Why Your Baby Doesn’t Sleep Through The Night, Read This

If You’re Wondering Why Your Baby Doesn’t Sleep Through The Night, Read This

Parents expect babies to sleep through most of the day, and that all it takes is for them to be fed and popped into their cot for the remaining part of the day. Well, if this scenario exists, it’s an exception to the rule. Being a parent is tiresome, and you want to make sure that your child is getting as much sleep as he or she needs. Here are some reasons why even a healthy baby does not sleep through the night.

1. Babies have shorter sleep cycles

While adult sleep cycles last an average of 90 minutes, infant sleep cycles are shorter, lasting from 50 to 60 minutes. This is why they experience periods of night waking every hour or so.

2. Babies wake up at night to get your attention

Babies may sleep better during the day because at night, they will get more attention from their two primary caregivers. During this period, there are fewer disturbances or interruptions to taking care of your child.

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3. Babies don’t sleep as deeply as adults

Not only do babies require a longer time to sleep and have more frequent waking periods during the night, they are lighter sleepers than adults.

4. A newborn’s body clock is not set

Another reason why babies don’t sleep at night is that their body clocks are not set yet. We sleep at night and wake up in the morning because we have circadian rhythms; these cycles of rest and activity get synchronized to light and darkness. Although a baby’s internal clock is fully formed before he is born, his brain doesn’t respond to it until he is 2-5 months old.

5. They are adjusting to developmental milestones

As your baby learns to walk, pull up, roll, crawl, talk, etc., their sleep can become disrupted (naps too). It is important that they get appropriate naps during the day to help them get plenty of sleep, even when their new skills keep waking them up.

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6. Their desire to eat

This one may seem obvious, yet when a 5-month-old baby is waking at night for a feeding or two, it could become a cause for concern. It is important to read about night feedings and when to night wean so you can understand how to deal with this.

7. They wake up because they are supposed to

It simply is natural for infants not to sleep for long periods. They are meant to have frequent breaks during the sleeping process. It reveals a very high level of development and intellectual accomplishment when the baby cannot sleep throughout the night.

8. They need some closeness with their parents

Babies are meant to maintain continual and close contact with their parents. This goes back to the evolutionary history of humans to be close to their source of food and love.

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9. They need movement

Babies like to be moved in different ways because they need gross sensory interaction. Through the transition from womb to the world, their nervous systems are still vulnerable and they do not have the emotional or physical capacity to cope with things like tiredness, pain, or hunger.

10. They are teething

Some children seem to struggle with teething. During the night especially, teething can be quite painful and can be, of course, very uncomfortable. Teething could cause restlessness, tummy aches, and loss of appetite.

11. They are learning a new skill

Learning to sit, walk, roll over, crawl, or grab could inspire them to wake up at night to practice these skills. Your baby could wake up without crying and simply want to play. They find it hard to switch off at bedtime and would rather practice these wonderful new skills.

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Featured photo credit: http://www.pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on May 15, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

When we are still children, our thoughts seem to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

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Just imagine then how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power! We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities. We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb. We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits. We’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head.

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

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So…how exactly are we to achieve that?

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are a few ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

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2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty. If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what is really important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

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4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking. It is like watching a DVD that saddens and frustrates you, completely pulling you down. Eject that old DVD, throw it away and insert a new, better, more hopeful one instead.

So, instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember: You are (or will become) what you think you are. This is reason enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

Featured photo credit: Kyaw Tun via unsplash.com

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