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12 Reasons For Tiredness And How To Deal With Them

12 Reasons For Tiredness And How To Deal With Them

If you find yourself regularly snapping out of a quick cat nap at work or you just feel too tired to engage in the activities that you used to love, then chances are that something’s wrong. While it’s easy to shrug off reasons of feeling tired as just a temporary thing, feeling tired all the time can actually be a symptom of a much bigger problem. From not taking care of your body all the way to actual medical problems, tiredness is a symptom that you shouldn’t ignore.

The Cause: You’re dehydrated.

The Cure: Make sure you’re drinking at least two liters of water a day.

Dehydration is a huge cause of both headaches and that tired, run-down feeling. Water is a huge part of your body’s make-up, and failing to keep it plumped up with the appropriate amount of liquid can result in feelings of fatigue and general crabbiness. Aim to drink at least two liters of water a day, or indulge in water-drenched foods like fruits and vegetables.

The Cause: You’re not getting enough quality sleep.

The Cure: Uncover why you’re lacking under the covers.

There can be a variety of reasons why you’re not getting the regular, snooze you need. This can range from outside noise, to a snoring partner or even too many electronic devices in your bedroom. Make your bedroom an oasis of calm, free from distractions other than sleep. Developing a bedtime routine, for example, going to bed at the same time every night, can help boost your sleep potential.

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The Cause: You’re the coffee shop’s best customer.

The Cure: Knock off the caffeine after noon.

Most people love to start their day with a steaming hot cup of joe, but do you really need to down it throughout your day? Ramping up your caffeine intake during the day can have serious repercussions in the evening, and can make you a jittery, nervous time bomb. Try opting for water instead in the afternoon, giving your body a break from caffeine and paving the way to an easy bedtime.

The Cause: You’re out of shape.

The Cure: Aim for exercise at least three times a week.

You already know that exercise is important for your overall health and emotional well-being, but did you know that it can help improve your sleep patterns? According to a study by The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, those who regularly engaged in exercise slept more soundly, and generally for 45 minutes to an hour longer than their tubby counterparts. Getting your exercise in doesn’t have to take up tons of time, either. Try going for a brisk walk on your lunch hour, wearing a pedometer to get your 10,000 steps a day or just engaging in an activity you like, such as the company softball team.

The Cause: You’re a barfly.

The Cure: Take a step back from regular drinking.

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While the odd glass of wine may make you feel snoozy and can appear to help you drop off to sleep, regular, heavy drinking can have a seriously damaging effect on your ability to engage in quality sleep. Multiple studies over the years have shown that moderate to excessive drinking habits can significantly decrease REM sleep — the most restorative type of sleep, not the band.

The Cause: You’re possibly anemic.

The Cure: Turn on the iron in your diet.

The feeling of chronic fatigue can come from a great many things, but one of the most commonly undiagnosed is anemia, or low iron in the blood. Without the appropriate amount of iron, your body is unable to produce that all-important hemoglobin, which results in chronic feelings of tiredness. If you’ve been diagnosed as anemic, try taking an iron supplement and increasing your intake of iron-rich foods such as spinach and steak.

The Cause: You’ve got the blues.

The Cure: See your doctor immediately.

While everyone has a bad day from time to time, feelings of depression are nothing to ignore. The sooner you see your doctor to discuss your fatigue and low-mood, the better. If you’ve found that you’re having feelings of “the blues,” your doctor will be able to help regulate you with either medication or suggest therapies to engage in.

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The Cause: You’re a new parent.

The Cure: Make sure you’re getting adequate help.

From midnight feedings to the constant worry, being a new parent is a world that’s rife with little rest. While the first few weeks with a new baby are going to be emotionally and physically trying, it’s important to develop a routine as soon as possible. Take turns with your partner to do midnight feedings and changings; or ask a friend or family member to pitch in so you can get some extra space for yourself. Grabbing those much-needed moments of relaxation, no matter how short, can add up to feeling more energized.

The Cause: You’re stressed out.

The Cure: Teach yourself to relax a little.

Feelings of anxiety, stress and worry can certainly keep you up night, and the worse it becomes the more you’ll feel fatigue during the day. Learning new coping mechanisms, such as meditation and deep breathing techniques, can help enormously to make you feel both relaxed and refreshed. If the feelings persist, it’s important to pay your doctor a visit to ensure there aren’t additional underlying causes to your constant fatigue.

The Cause: You’re a vegetarian or vegan.

The Cure: Get your vitamins.

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It’s a sad fact for the plant-eaters: the only way to naturally get your vitamin B12 is to eat animal protein. Having B12 deficiency — even at borderline levels — can cause you to feel run-down and tired. While meat alternatives on the market may be able to provide you with most of the nutrition you need, when it comes to B12 you’ll need a synthetic supplement. Many report feeing a significant boost once they start taking it.

The Cause: You have an undiagnosed medical condition.

The Cure: See your doctor regularly.

Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid conditions can leave you feeling wiped out. Once you start feeling constantly tired, take a look at what other symptoms you may be experiencing. It’s easy to overlook the most basic of symptoms, but these can often be your tip-off to a larger problem. Make a note of when and where you feel any symptom so you’re able to adequately communicate it with your doctor.

The Cause: You smoke.

The Cure: Stub out the butt.

While your sleep patterns can be slightly disturbed when you first quit smoking, your overall quality of sleep will actually improve after just a week or two of kicking the habit. Though you may have used to think of grabbing a smoke as a relaxing experience, nicotine is a stimulant that can easy interrupt your ability to relax and get the rest you need.

Featured photo credit: Sleeping Beauty/critiquemyphoto via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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