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11 Things You Should Beware Of When Kids And Dogs Are Living Together

11 Things You Should Beware Of When Kids And Dogs Are Living Together

Kids and dogs usually get along just fine. They can be great playmates and having a dog around can teach kids a lot about respect and kindness for our animal friends. But problems may arise when kids and dogs are left unsupervised or training has been neglected. This can lead to aggressive behavior and may result in injury. There are 4.7 million dog bites a year in the USA and half of these victims are children. It is a well known fact that 9 out of 10 victims knew the dog in question. It was either a neighbor’s dog or the family pet. One study showed that the family pet was responsible for about 30% of bites.

The bottom line is that children and dogs need training so that they can learn to respect their territories. Here are 11 tips if you happen to be a dog owner which is in contact with kids or you have a dog at home when children are born.

1. Dogs need to be trained

If your dog is part of the family, make sure that you have dedicated time for basic training so that when kids play around him, there are no problems. This is easier if the dog is a puppy so that you can start early on. Dogs should not be allowed in the dining room or kitchen at mealtimes because this can set off a whole series of incidents and problems and may end up with the dog trying to steal the child’s food. Basic obedience training needs to cover the following:

  • Sit
  • Walking with a leash
  • Down
  • Stay
  • Come

Using treats such as food, favorite toys or physical contact such as a tummy rub are great ways to reward the dog as it makes progress. You also need to be calm and consistent and avoid any punishing treatment which will turn the dog off training for ever.

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2. Supervise kids and dogs playing

This is essential as kids have to get used to dogs and how they react to being played with. Many dogs cannot stand all the shouting and shrieking. At least, if you have started with the basic training, it is fairly easy to keep things under control. Experts say that kids should be at least four years old before they can be left alone with dogs but you have to be the best judge of that. There is some excellent advice in the book by Colleen Pelar, Living with Kids and Dogs . . . Without Losing Your Mind: A Parent’s Guide to Controlling the Chaos (Volume 2)

3. Kids need training, too

You have to teach toddlers from early on to respect the dog’s territorial limits. No dog likes the facial close-ups or being stared at in the eyes. Also teaching the child early on to teach the dog to sit is a good way to start.

In addition, kids have to become aware that there may be problems if the dog is playing with a toy and the child comes too close. Similar problems could arise when the dog is eating his food.

They also need to be careful about poking things into the dog’s ears or yanking its tail. Teaching the child about how a dog reacts to pain, aggression or fright is important, too.

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4. Think about having your dog neutered

There are some advantages in this as the dog tends to be less aggressive and also will not bother too much about roaming. That could save him or her from being put down or ending up in misery in an animal shelter. Also female dogs will urinate less, thereby avoiding intrusion by neighbors’ dogs looking for a mating partner. This makes for a quieter home life for dogs, parents and kids alike.

5. Dogs need their space, too

There will be times when it is not appropriate that the dog is around such as when a toddler is learning to walk. A dog also wants a bit of peace and quiet so creating a space for them in a back room, or outside if the weather is clement, is a good idea. Very young children should not have access to the dog’s private area. You can find a kennel or crate or both. It also reduces a lot of the mess when older dogs become incontinent. Pet doors or dog flaps to their own area is an excellent idea as it saves you or the kids opening the door for them all the time!

6. Dogs can be helped with homeopathic medicine

When dogs get too nervous, agitated or stressed out, you may find that there is a lot of barking, scratching and growling going on. This can sometimes happen when the pet is under stress or there has been past abuse. A great way to avoid any problems with the kids is to administer a homeopathic remedy which can calm the pet down. Look for remedies which contain Scutellaria, Chamomilla, Arsen alb and Belladonna. It makes life easier for everybody.

7. Choosing the right dog

There may come a time when your kids really want a dog or you may have to replace a previous pet. There are several things to bear in mind when choosing one:

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  • Large dogs may knock children over too easily
  • Guard dogs may not be appropriate
  • Dogs who bark a lot are not recommended
  • Consider certain breeds of dogs which are more adapted to families such as beagles, bulldogs and labradors.
  • Avoid highly strung and hysterical small dogs

8. Monitor your dog training

Dog experts recommend that you watch out for problem areas which may indicate that more dog training is needed. You may find that the dog jumps up on children or growls and snaps at them. At this point you may have to be much stricter with the obedience training and more vigilant in your supervision.

9. Teach children how to treat dogs gently

It is amazing to see how some children are always tugging, poking and pinching dogs and most of the time, dogs put up with it. But one day, they will react and there could be serious consequences.

It is much better to teach kids how to pet a dog and they can practise with a toy before trying their gentle strokes on the dog.

10. When dogs bark too much

Sometimes dogs will bark at the slightest noise and this may be a problem with a sleeping baby or adults. There are electronic anti-barking collars available now and this may be one solution. Another possibility is to move the dog as far away as possible while the baby is sleeping.

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11. Decide on sleeping arrangements

It is incredible that some parents allow their kids to sleep with the family pet. This can lead to enormous problems down the road, not least with hygiene and behavior. Obviously, the dog must have his own bed, preferably in its own private area.

If parents are committed to living together in harmony with a dog, they will need to dedicate time and effort to make sure that the experience is a happy one for the whole family.

Let us know how your kids and dogs get along together in the comments and how you prevented any problems from developing.

Featured photo credit: Jules and the boys/Kristopher Volkman via flickr.com

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Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

In Personal Development-speak, we are always talking about goals, outcomes, success, desires and dreams. In other words, all the stuff we want to do, achieve and create in our world.

And while it’s important for us to know what we want to achieve (our goal), it’s also important for us to understand why we want to achieve it; the reason behind the goal or some would say, our real goal.

Why is goal setting important?

1. Your needs and desire will be fulfilled.

Sometimes when we explore our “why”, (why we want to achieve a certain thing) we realize that our “what” (our goal) might not actually deliver us the thing (feeling, emotion, internal state) we’re really seeking.

For example, the person who has a goal to lose weight in the belief that weight loss will bring them happiness, security, fulfillment, attention, popularity and the partner of their dreams. In this instance, their “what” is weight-loss and their “why” is happiness (etc.) and a partner.

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Six months later, they have lost the weight (achieved their goal) but as is often the case, they’re not happier, not more secure, not more confident, not more fulfilled and in keeping with their miserable state, they have failed to attract their dream partner.

After all, who wants to be with someone who’s miserable? They achieved their practical goal but still failed to have their needs met.

So they set a goal to lose another ten pounds. And then another. And maybe just ten more. With the destructive and erroneous belief that if they can get thin enough, they’ll find their own personal nirvana. And we all know how that story ends.

2. You’ll find out what truly motivates you

The important thing in the process of constructing our best life is not necessarily what goals we set (what we think we want) but what motivates us towards those goals (what we really want).

The sooner we begin to explore, identify and understand what motivates us towards certain achievements, acquisitions or outcomes (that is, we begin moving towards greater consciousness and self awareness), the sooner we will make better decisions for our life, set more intelligent (and dare I say, enlightened) goals and experience more fulfilment and less frustration.

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We all know people who have achieved what they set out to, only to end up in the same place or worse (emotionally, psychologically, sociologically) because what they were chasing wasn’t really what they were needing.

What we think we want will rarely provide us with what we actually need.

3. Your state of mind will be a lot healthier

We all set specific goals to achieve/acquire certain things (a job, a car, a partner, a better body, a bank balance, a title, a victory) because at some level, most of us believe (consciously or not) that the achievement of those goals will bring us what we really seek; joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

Of course, setting practical, material and financial goals is an intelligent thing to do considering the world we live in and how that world works.

But setting goals with an expectation that the achievement of certain things in our external, physical world will automatically create an internal state of peace, contentment, joy and total happiness is an unhealthy and unrealistic mindset to inhabit.

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What you truly want and need

Sometimes we need to look beyond the obvious (superficial) goals to discover and secure what we really want.

Sadly, we live in a collective mindset which teaches that the prettiest and the wealthiest are the most successful.

Some self-help frauds even teach this message. If you’re rich or pretty, you’re happy. If you’re both, you’re very happy. Pretty isn’t what we really want; it’s what we believe pretty will bring us. Same goes with money.

When we cut through the hype, the jargon and the self-help mumbo jumbo, we all have the same basic goals, desires and needs:

Joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

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Nobody needs a mansion or a sport’s car but we all need love.

Nobody needs massive pecs, six percent body-fat, a face lift or bigger breasts but we all need connection, acceptance and understanding.

Nobody needs to be famous but we all need peace, calm, balance and happiness.

The problem is, we live in a culture which teaches that one equals the other. If only we lived in a culture which taught that real success is far more about what’s happening in our internal environment, than our external one.

It’s a commonly-held belief that we’re all very different and we all have different goals — whether short term or long term goals. But in many ways we’re not, and we don’t; we all want essentially the same things.

Now all you have to do is see past the fraud and deception and find the right path.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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