Advertising
Advertising

30 Heartfelt Sympathy Messages to Alleviate Sorrow

30 Heartfelt Sympathy Messages to Alleviate Sorrow

Loss hurts like hell, and it’s something that each and every one of us will experience at some point in our lives. Everything that lives must also die, and as the years roll along, it’s inevitable that we will lose those close to us, including friends, family members, animal companions, and mentors.

Sorrow may not only be caused by death, but can also be a side-effect of relationship deterioration, be that a romantic connection or a friendship. Although there isn’t any balm that can heal our pain completely, reading messages of sympathy and reassurance may help a great deal. If someone you know has experienced the pain of loss recently, sharing one of the sympathy messages below may lighten their spirits a little bit, and remind them that they are cared about by others. Feel free to re-word them in any way that feels right to you.

Expressions

“I’m sorry. I know those words are inadequate, but I am truly sorry for what you’re experiencing right now. Please let me know if there’s anything I can do to help.”

“Wishing you peace and strength during this difficult time.”

“I cannot take away your pain, but I can listen if you’d like to talk about it.”

“My home is open to you whenever you need it, even if it’s just for a change of scenery and a cup of coffee. You are always welcome.”

“Although no words can really help to ease your loss, know that you are in my thoughts.”

Advertising

“I cannot even begin to imagine what you’re going through and how difficult all this must be for you. Please know that I am always there for you, whether you need to talk or cry or even just sit in silence with someone.”

“Words, however kind, can’t mend your heartache, but those who care for you share your grief and wish you comfort and peace of mind.”

“I want to help but have no idea how. Please let me know how I can help you?”

“I still miss those I loved who are no longer with me, but I find I am grateful for having loved them. Over time, gratitude has finally conquered the loss.”

“Know that you made an incredible impact on _____’s life, and that they were better and happier for having known you.”

“I am at a loss for words during this sorrowful time, but please know that I am thinking of you and praying for peace and comfort for you and your family.”

“Your emotions are important during this time, and as your friend, I’m happy to help you shoulder them.”

Advertising

“I’m here for you during this dark time, and will be here for you when the light begins to shine for you again.”

“May the sorrow you feel in your heart lighten by the love that surrounds you.”

“Remember ______’s stories, and how they made you feel; by doing that, part of _____ will always remain with you.”

Quotes to Share

“I know for certain that we never lose the people we love, even to death. They continue to participate in every act, thought and decision we make. Their love leaves an indelible imprint in our memories. We find comfort in knowing that our lives have been enriched by having shared their love.” – Leo Buscaglia

“There are no goodbyes for us. Wherever you are, you will always be in my heart.” – Gandhi

“I used to have a sign pinned up on my wall that read: ‘Only to the extent that we expose ourselves over and over to annihilation can that which is indestructible be found in us’.” – Pema Chödrön

“What we have once enjoyed we can never lose; all that we love deeply becomes a part of us.” – Helen Keller

“In time, it will be the the small, everyday occurrences that you’ll remember most: the laughs, the stories, the smiles. Although it might seem like the pain will never go away, it is these very memories that will help push the sorrow away and bring back happier feelings, in time.”

“Oh heart, if one should say to you that the soul perishes like the body, answer that the flower withers, but the seed remains.” – Kahlil Gibran

“Learn to get in touch with silence within yourself, and know that everything in this life has purpose. There are no mistakes, no coincidences, all events are blessings given to us to learn from.” – Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

“You can’t truly heal from a loss until you allow yourself to really FEEL the loss.” – Mandy Hale

“Perhaps they are not just stars, but rather, openings in heaven where the love of our lost ones pours through and shines down upon us to let us know they are happy.”

“Let children walk with Nature, let them see the beautiful blendings and communions of death and life, their joyous inseparable unity, as taught in woods and meadows, plains and mountains and streams of our blessed star, and they will learn that death is stingless indeed, and as beautiful as life.” – John Muir

“It isn’t what happens to us that causes us to suffer; it’s what we say to ourselves about what happens.” – Pema Chödrön

“Everyone who lives long enough to love deeply will experience great losses. Don’t let fear of loss, or the losses themselves, take away your ability to enjoy the wonderful life that is yours.” – Barbara Cooper

“If ever there is tomorrow when we’re not together…there is something you must always remember. You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think, but the most important thing is, even if we’re apart… I’ll always be with you.” – Winnie the Pooh

“Like a bird singing in the rain, let grateful memories survive in time of sorrow” – Robert Louis Stevenson

“The most authentic thing about us is our capacity to create, to overcome, to endure, to transform, to love and to be greater than our suffering.” – Ben Okri

Time will eventually alleviate some of the pain that loss brings, but it’s important to remember that sorrow and pain needn’t be suffered alone: there are always people who are willing to help. If you or someone you care about is suffering, please take advantage of counselors at your school or workplace, or call a help line. Don’t face it alone.

 

More by this author

Catherine Winter

Catherine is a wordsmith covering lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

10 Things That Even You Can Do to Change the World 10 Benefits of Reading: Why You Should Read Every Day 30 Awesome DIY Projects that You’ve Never Heard of 20 Online Resources for Free E-Books 10 Books to Help You Polish Your English & Writing Skills

Trending in Communication

1 7 Science-Backed Books About Spirituality That Will Change Your Life 2 20 Things Life Is Too Short to Worry About 3 How to Find Inner Peace and Lasting Happiness 4 Dismissing Sadness Will End up Making You Sadder 5 Why We Say What We Won’t Do (but Still Say It Anyway)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 12, 2021

Why We Say What We Won’t Do (but Still Say It Anyway)

Why We Say What We Won’t Do (but Still Say It Anyway)

Every day we say a lot about what we want and will do.

“I want to pet a cat.”

“I want to buy a house for my parents.”

“I don’t want to be single anymore.”

“I will love you no matter what.”

“I will work harder in the future.”

Advertising

    It’s easy to make plans for the future. And we make resolutions all the time. Consider that a full 80% of resolutions fail by the second week of February.[1] And that a vast majority of relationships (plus many marriages) end as well with break-ups or divorce. The best intentions and the best-laid plans generally speaking end in failure.

    No one intended to lie

    In general, people make these kinds of promises or resolutions with the best intentions. They don’t want to fail; if anything, they want desperately to be right, to improve themselves, and to make their friends and family happy. So even if a resolution doesn’t work out, when they utter them, it’s far from a lie.

      People often speak without thinking. They say what comes to mind, but without really thinking it through. And what usually comes to mind is wishful thinking – the ideal result, not what’s possible and practical. It’s tempting to fantasize about a beautiful and perfect future: a good romantic relationship, to have the approval and respect of your parents, and to have a successful career.

      But how to get what you want is not always clear to you in the moment you utter it. It’s hard to see beyond just the easy, idealized image. The challenges you may come across, the disappointments and sadness you may face – none of that is anywhere to be seen in a daydreaming mind.

      Advertising

      Wishful thinking often end in crushing disappointment

      The problem is this. Wishful thinking and fantasies will only end in disappointment if you don’t follow through. You disappoint your friends, your family, your boss, and – most importantly – yourself. This can really take a toll on your own psyche and sense of self-worth.

            At a personal level, you’ll have so many unfulfilled dreams and goals. This is an incredibly common situation for people everywhere. As a teenager, you might have dreamed of what your life would be like as an adult: happily married and with a successful and high-earning career by the time you’re 25. But these are two seriously challenging goals that take planning and effort. Many people find themselves alone and in a dead-end job – rather than a career – wondering where they went wrong.

            Advertising

                On an interpersonal level, making empty promises is hurtful and damaging to relationships. Friendship and healthy family relationships are built on trust. People who want to be your friend take you at your word and expect you to follow through. If you tell your friends that you’ll “be there for them,” but never pick up the phone, they will be hurt and no longer want to hang out. The same is true for family or even professional relationships. You might find it tempting to tell your boss that you’ll finish a major project “by the end of the week,” without considering whether this is plausible. If you are unable to complete the task in the timeframe that you set, it’s not easy to regain your boss’s trust.

                Keep what you want to yourself

                It’s vital to be clear about what you want. Notice when people around you are prone to saying “I want ___” and “I don’t want ____.”

                Kids are very prone to saying all their wants out loud, partly because they don’t have the independence and resources to get it themselves. This is why children and young people are often vague about what they want in the future. They have lots of wants without a concrete plan on how to get them.

                This is one of the challenges of being an adult. As you gain the practical ability to provide for yourself, and as you learn from your mistakes, it’s more and more important to be clear about how you plan to get what you want.

                Advertising

                  Practice visualizing plans to attain your goals. For example, you might want a pet – everyone shares pictures of their dogs and cats on Instagram! But before you go out to adopt one at the shelter, make sure you visualize all the things you have to do to take care of your pet. Pet-ownership involves: cleaning up after it, house-training it, taking it to the vet, walking it, buying it food, and making sure that it gets plenty of stimulation and exercise.

                  If you want or need a car, think about how much you need to save to purchase the car, the cleaning and maintenance costs, how to pay for regular car insurance, parking costs, et cetera.

                    If you really want something, don’t just say it. Plan for it and do it. Create conditions that make what you want inevitable. Do small things consistently and make it a habit. You’ll amaze yourself and your friends if you constantly work on attaining your goals. Read more about how to follow through your goals here: Why I Can Be the Only 8% of People Who Reach the Goal Every Single Time

                    It’s easy to make or break promises. Set yourself apart from others by being reliable, deliberate, and thoughtful. Match your intentions with planning and action, and you’ll find that you’re happier with yourself and that your relationships are enriched.

                    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                    Reference

                    Read Next