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9 Facts About Introverts Everyone Thinks are True

9 Facts About Introverts Everyone Thinks are True

Psychotherapists, including Carl Jung and Briggs Myers, agree that there are two main, legitimate personality types: extroverts and introverts. Introverts have been wildly misunderstood for a long time. Fortunately, people are now beginning to talk about and understand introversion, which is simply a need for some time alone with your own thoughts and feelings.

Jonathan Rauch, in an article for The Atlantic, notes that for introverts time alone with their thoughts is as restorative as sleeping and as nourishing as eating. Introverts prefer to avoid the limelight and thrive on one-on-one interactions. Extroverts, on the other hand, are energized by people and wilt or fade when alone.

With all the discussions about introversion happening online, do you fully understand introverts?

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Here are nine things you probably have wrong about them.

1. Introverts are shy

People frequently confuse introversion with being shy and even use the two words interchangeably. Shyness has more to do with anxiety and discomfort in situations involving social interaction, while introversion has to do with needing some time alone after social interactions to recharge and regain expended energy. Bill Gates is soft-spoken, bookish and introverted, but is he shy? Of course not. He wouldn’t be overly bothered by what you say to or think of him.

2. Introverts hate people

Just because introverts need (and enjoy) time alone more than their extroverted counterparts does not mean that they hate people. On the contrary, introverts love people. They just tend to enjoy social interactions in a different way than extroverts do. Don’t be too pushy or judgmental when at a party—introverts prefer to sit calmly and watch the action from the sidelines. It’s not that they are anti-social or that they don’t want to have fun; it’s just that it’s more fun for them to enjoy the party quietly.

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3. Introverts are neurotic

Extroverts might think introverts are neurotic, but this perception is often very far from the truth. Introverts don’t have extreme mood swings any more than extroverts do. They are not constant worriers, nor do they have a paranoid personality. Introverts can cope in any social setting just as well as extroverts can. They will only need some time alone afterwards to re-energize.

4. Introverts are mentally unstable

Introverts are not any more prone to mental illness than other people. Needing private time to restore your energy and preferring to work on your own over working in teams does not make you mentally unstable.

5. Introverts are bad leaders

Historically, introverts have made some of the best leaders the world has seen. Abraham Lincoln was quiet, reserved and dignified. He was revered as a man who did not ‘offend by superiority.’ Mahatma Gandhi, Queen Elizabeth II, Winston Churchill, Eleanor Roosevelt, Walt Disney, and Steve Jobs all make the long list of exceptional, introverted leaders.

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6. Introverts are depressed

This misconception likely stems from the fact that extroverts—who draw their energy from being in the company of others—feel depressed and sad when they spend long hours alone. They therefore imagine introverts feel the same way spending all that time alone quietly engrossed in their own thoughts. This might be a genuine misconception, but it is not right to put extrovert feelings on introverts. Introverts enjoy their time alone and are not depressed.

7. Introverts are losers

You might not know it, but many of the world’s most successful personalities in all spheres of business and industry are actually introverts. Oprah Winfrey, Michael Jordan, Steven Spielberg, Harrison Ford, Christina Aguilera, and J.K. Rowling, among many others, are introverts. These people are not losers.

8. Introverts have nothing to say

In a highly extrovert world that just can’t stop talking, introverts simply won’t speak unless they have something worthwhile to say. That’s all it is!

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9. Introverts are more intelligent

Many introverts, like Albert Einstein, Charles Darwin and Marcel Proust, are highly celebrated thinkers, but many others are not. Being introverted does not automatically make you more intelligent. It’s just that the best ideas often happen when people are in a more reflective, introverted mindset.

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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