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7 Important Life Lessons from Disney’s “Frozen”

7 Important Life Lessons from Disney’s “Frozen”

Almost everyone I’ve met has seen the movie Frozen. With catchy songs, heart warming tales and scenes that make you smile, Frozen immediately became a family favorite.

Besides the wonderful display of colors and characters, Frozen can actually teach us important life lessons.

Here are 7 of them.

1. Family is important.

elsa_anna

    The whole film runs on the theme of the importance of family. The relationship between Anna and Elsa clearly emphasizes family love.

    Separated at such a young age, Anna longed for the company of her sister. Given the fact that she lost most memories of Elsa, she wanted to build a relationship with her even more.

    When Elsa ran away from the castle after freezing Arendelle, Anna embarked on a journey to retrieve her sister, even if she had to do it alone.

    She wouldn’t stop at any cost until she got the only family member she had left, Elsa.

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    This shows that treasuring your family is very important. You might not agree with some of the things you family might say or do, but it’s important not to allow that affect your relationship with them.

    2. Be unapologetically you.

    Elsa was never part of the popular club. With the magical powers she had, she was an outcast and exiled when people found out. Some even threatened to have her killed. Elsa finally realized that there’s no point pretending someone she isn’t anymore. She left for the mountains and established her ice castle there.

    This is also the part where viewers were introduced to the song that would be stuck in their head forever—Let it Go.

    Sometimes there is a part of us that we do not embrace because we try to fit in—the part of us which isn’t a problem to begin with. However we try being like others, losing the essence of who we really are.

    It’s time we embrace our uniqueness and stop trying to fit in. Sometimes we need to think about whether the “cold” was even a bother to begin with. When you realize that you should keep being you, you automatically become a more beautiful person, just as Elsa did.

    3. Stop bottling your emotions.

    frozen-let-it-go

      The ability to share your emotions with others is an amazing thing. Unfortunately for Elsa, due to her isolation, she had no one to share her emotions with.

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      In the end, it ended up pretty messy when Elsa met the real world. Imagine if she was allowed to be exposed to the real world bit by bit. I’m sure she would have developed control of her emotions better than what happened in the film.

      If you’re happy, share the joy with the world and if you’re down, sharing it with the right people will help you feel better. Emotions are better shared; sometimes you just got to let it go.

      4. No one is an island.

      Anna tried to save Elsa; Kristoff needed help with his ice business; and Olaf needed a nose to become a legitimate snowman. In all of these tasks, none of them were accomplished on their own.

      Anna could not have saved Elsa without the help of Kristoff and Sven. Kristoff would have remained out of business if the whole of Arendelle remained frozen, and Olaf got his nose from Kristoff’s carrot.

      It’s funny how we think that we can accomplish anything by ourselves. But the truth is, more often than not, we need the help of others.

      The characters of Frozen helped one another to accomplish the goal of restoring Arendelle. In the end, all of the characters benefited from it.

      We can’t do everything on our own and sometimes, asking for help doesn’t mean you are weak—it simply means you are not going to let your ego stop you from achieving your goal.

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      5. Don’t believe things that are too good to be true.

      There’s the saying that goes, “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” and I think it applies to this situation. This is especially true when it comes to meeting people.

      Most of the times, what you know about someone is what they want you to know about them. When you meet someone for the first time, it’s pretty foolish to take everything they say for gospel, especially if it’s too good to be true.

      This applies to both people and material goods. Sometimes when you find someone or something that’s too good to be true, adding some skepticism can prevent you from getting into the kind of trouble that Anna did with Prince Hanz.

      6. Dream big.

      olaf

        Olaf had a dream of enjoying a summer, and it’s no doubt a crazy dream. A snowman enjoying summer is like throwing ice cream into a microwave and hoping it doesn’t melt. It just doesn’t make any sense.

        However Olaf never let that bother him; he remained cheerful and happy hoping to achieve that dream one day.

        We all have big dreams and sometimes phrases like, “Are you crazy? ” or “That is impossible” can really hurt us.

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        When you feel that way, remember the happiness that Olaf had, and keep chasing your dreams. Never give up because others say your dream is too big.

        It might sound crazy, but the people who are crazy enough who think they can change the world are often the ones who do.

        7. Love can change the world.

        Arendelle was about to be covered in Ice, and Anna was dying because of a frozen heart. The only cure was true love.

        Instead of Anna getting kissed by a Prince Charming, it was her gift of sacrifice that unfroze Arendelle. In the end, that sacrifice melted the “ice” in her heart as well.

        This speaks a lot about how how true love requires sacrifice, an element that is so often forgotten.

        If everyone would sacrifice some of their time and exhibit love and kindness to the people around them, we could rid this world of the “cold” in the hearts of people. Replacing it with the warmth of love is something that can potentially change the world.

        Featured photo credit: Frozen via flickr.com

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        The Gentle Art of Saying No

        The Gentle Art of Saying No

        No!

        It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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        But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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        What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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        But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

        1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
        2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
        3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
        4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
        5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
        6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
        7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
        8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
        9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
        10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

        Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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