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Last Updated on November 27, 2020

40 Inspirational Quotes on Overcoming Challenges

40 Inspirational Quotes on Overcoming Challenges

We all have those days when the challenges we’re facing seem insurmountable, when we’re not sure how to move forward or find motivation. These days may surprise us, or small challenges may build up over time and turn into bigger challenges. Whatever the case, sometimes we just need some words of wisdom or some overcoming challenges quotes to give us that extra push we need to keep going.

From Rumi and Ghandi, to Barack Obama and Eleanor Roosevelt, we’ve gathered together 41 overcoming challenges quotes to help you on your journey. When you find yourself doubting your ability to overcome the difficulties in life that you’re facing, look to one or two of these quotes to remind you that you are capable of overcoming any challenge.

Overcoming Challenges Quotes

“All the energy in the universe is evenly present in all places at the same time. We don’t get energy, we release energy. And the triggering mechanism to release energy is desire. When you have a strong desire to do something, you will always have the energy to do it.” —Bob Proctor


“A one-talented man who decides upon a definite object accomplishes more than a ten-talented man who scatters his energies and never knows exactly what he will do.” —Orison Swett Marden, from Pushing to the Front


“In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.” —Thomas Jefferson


Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan ‘Press On’ has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.” –Calvin Coolidge


“The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; to be kind, but not weak; to be bold, but not a bully; to be thoughtful, but not lazy; to be humble, but not timid; to be proud, but not arrogant; to have humor, but without folly.” —Jim Rohn


“The future rewards those who press on. I don’t have time to feel sorry for myself. I don’t have time to complain. I’m going to press on.” —Barack Obama


“Your fate has not been written until you pick up a pen.” —Dean Bokhari


“When times are good, be grateful, and when times are tough, be graceful.” —Dustin Poirier


“Take one step in the direction of your dreams and watch the Universe perform miracles to help you.” —Alexandra Domelle


“Some men see things as they are and say why. I dream things that never were and say why not.” —Bobby Kennedy


“You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing you think you cannot do.” —Eleanor Roosevelt


“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” —Aristotle


“If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth writing.” —Benjamin Franklin


“Everything will be okay in the end. If it isn’t okay, it isn’t the end.” —Paulo Coelho


“Don’t just visualize success at the end. Visualize the process. Don’t just picture yourself winning. Picture the steps it takes to get there.” —Dean Bokhari


“He who sweats more in training bleeds less in war.” —Greek Proverb


“There’s never enough time to do everything, but there’s always enough time to do the most important thing.” —Dean Bokhari


“Don’t be afraid to do something you’re not qualified to do.” —Dan Carlin


“A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and goes to bed at night and in between does what he wants to do.” —Bob Dylan


“People will forget what you said and did, but they will never forget how you made them feel.” —Maya Angelou


“Energy and persistence conquer all things.” —Benjamin Franklin


“Focus equals reality to the individual, even if it’s not reality in actuality.” —Anonymous


“Action is the foundational key to all success.” —Pablo Picasso


“Haters are like crickets. You can hear all the noise they make, but you can’t see them…Then, right when you walk by them, they’re quiet.” —Dean Bokhari


“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” —Theodore Roosevelt


“We cannot be sure of having something to live for unless we are willing to die for it.” ―Ernesto Guevara


“This is the true joy in life, being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one; being a force of nature instead of a feverish selfish clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the whole community, and as long as I live it is my privilege to do for it whatever I can. I want to be thoroughly used up when I die, for the harder I work, the more I love. I rejoice in life for its own sake. Life is no ‘brief candle’ to me. It is sort of a splendid torch which I have a hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it over to future generations.” —George Bernard Shaw


“Accept the presence of thorns, but let the rose inspire you.” —Steve Pavlina


“As you start to walk out on the way, the way appears.” —Rumi


“With enough courage, you can do without a reputation.” —Clark Gable


“Sometimes you’ve got to experience the ugly inside yourself to discover the beauty inside yourself.” —Dean Bokhari


“No one can make me feel inferior without my consent.” —Eleanor Roosevelt


“Leaders think and talk about the solutions. Followers think and talk about the problems.” —Brian Tracy


“No one can take your self respect if you do not give it to them,” —Ghandi


“Success is something you attract by the person you become.” —Jim Rohn


“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” —John Adams


“A good plan violently executed now is better than a perfect plan executed next week.” –George Patton


“Life grants nothing to us mortals without hard work.” –Horace


“They who lack talent expect things to happen without effort. They ascribe failure to a lack of inspiration or ability, or to misfortune, rather than to insufficient application. At the core of every true talent, there is an awareness of the difficulties inherent in any achievement, and the confidence that by persistence and patience something worthwhile will be realized. Thus talent is a species of vigor.” –Eric Hoffer


“Too many of us wait to do the perfect thing, with the result we do nothing. The way to get ahead is to start now. While many of us are waiting until conditions are ‘just right’ before we go ahead, others are stumbling along, fortunately ignorant of the dangers that beset them. By the time we are, in our superior wisdom, decided to make a start, we discover that those who have gone fearlessly on before, have, in their blundering way, traveled a considerable distance. If you start now, you will know a lot next year that you don’t know now, and that you will not know next year, if you wait.” –The William Feather Magazine

Final Thoughts

We all have bad days, weeks, and even months. We all feel helpless and lost at times[1]. However, those are the times when it’s most important to look closely at your skills and talents and push forward past the hard times in order to find a life you can be proud of. Use the above overcoming challenges quotes to motivate you to keep going and never give up.

More Tips on Overcoming Challenges

Featured photo credit: KAL VISUALS via unsplash.com

Reference

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Dean Bokhari

Author, Entrepreneur, Podcast & TV Host

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Published on February 17, 2021

How to Hack the Reward System in Your Brain And Stay Motivated

How to Hack the Reward System in Your Brain And Stay Motivated

How do we achieve our biggest goals in life? Hard work, learning new skills, and staying focused are definitely important things, but one of the most important things we need is motivation. Losing motivation can stop us in our tracks. It can make us procrastinate, doubt our skills and abilities, and take us off the path to success. In the worst cases, a lack of motivation can destroy our goals and kill our dreams.

Where does motivation come from?

It starts with thoughts and chemicals in the reward systems in our brains. It continues to develop in our brains and is further shaped by our behaviors. This is why neuroscience, which is the study of the function of the brain, is so important.

When we understand the basics of neuroscience, we can hack the reward system in our brains so we can stay motivated to achieve our biggest goals.

The Neuroscience of Motivation

At the most basic level, humans want to avoid pain and experience pleasure. Our pleasure-seeking behavior is based on a mental reward system that’s controlled by our brains. This reward system is what keeps us motivated and helps us achieve our biggest goals and dreams.

Neurotransmitters are chemicals in our brains that help shape our thoughts and behaviors. One of the main neurotransmitters in our reward system is the “pleasure” chemical dopamine. Dopamine is produced mainly in the mid-brain and then moves to other areas of the brain, such as the amygdala, which plays a big role in our emotional development. It also moves to the prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for thinking, feeling, planning, and taking action.[1]

When you do something pleasurable, your brain releases dopamine to make you feel good mentally and physically. This commonly happens when we eat our favorite foods, have sex, have a great conversation with someone, or do something else we really enjoy. Each time we feel pleasure from doing something, our brains remember what made us feel good. It actually assigns a reward value for everything we do.

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For example, eating a slice of our favorite pizza may have a higher reward value than drinking a smoothie. Being on that tropical vacation will have a higher reward value than watching that water fountain downtown.

Our brains even release dopamine before we engage in those things that make us happy. It’s the expectation of the reward rather than the reward itself that has the strongest influence on our emotional reactions and memories of what’s pleasurable.[2] Just planning that tropical vacation by checking out different locations on a travel site or looking at things we want to buy on Amazon stimulates our reward system by releasing dopamine.

Thinking about starting a project at work that we’re really passionate about also activates our reward system. This act of feeling the pleasure generated by our mental reward systems is what creates reward-seeking behavior and is a big part of motivation.

Vanderbilt University researchers discovered that “go-getters” who are more willing to work hard have greater dopamine activity in the striatum and prefrontal cortex, two areas of the brain that influence motivation and reward.[3]

Hacking Our Brain’s Reward System

Here are four ways to hack the reward system in your brain to stay motivated.

1. Keep Growing

When you do the same things over and over, that dopamine rush tends to get smaller and smaller. A great way to stay motivated is to keep growing by doing bigger and bigger things.

Take on bigger, more challenging projects at work. Once you’ve reached a running or fitness milestone, start working toward a bigger one. If you’re fluent in a foreign language, learn how to have more complex, philosophical conversations. If you have your own business, find ways to acquire more clients so you can generate more profit. Keep learning new skills that will push you to the edge of your comfort zone.

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Taking on greater challenges helps our brain’s reward system continue to assign high reward values to things we do. Start by accomplishing small goals. As you accumulate more and more small wins, work your way up to more challenging goals.

2. Use Visualization

“Visualization is daydreaming with a purpose.”—Bo Bennett

A great way to stay motivated is to visualize accomplishing a goal—even though you haven’t completed it yet. Visualization actually causes the brain to release dopamine. This makes us see our future rewards more clearly and go after them more fervently.

When our brains release dopamine and we feel that rush of euphoria, our hippocampus, which is part of our brain’s limbic system, records those pleasurable moments in our long-term memory. The more we visualize success, the more our brains associate this visualized success with pleasurable feelings.

When we can imagine a better future, we’re motivated to keep pushing forward and overcoming obstacles in our path. This is why people work hard to get raises and promotions, invest their money, put their kids thru college, and do other things that help them or others prosper later in life.

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Oprah Winfrey, Will Smith, Jim Carrey, and other famous and influential people have used visualization to achieve sky-high success.[4] It’s a great way to use the power of your imagination to keep you motivated to succeed.

3. Avoid Excessive Stress

High levels of stress are associated with chronic inflammation, which can cause our motivation to decrease. Researchers at Emory University have theorized that chronic inflammation from stress may cause a chemical reaction in the body that decreases dopamine supplies in the brain.[5]

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Low levels of stress can actually help us perform better by making us more alert. That adrenaline rush we get from stress can give us the energy and the edge to do our best. But when stress levels are high, stress can be damaging to our bodies, minds, and motivation.[6]

High-stress can lead to burnout. In the worse cases, it can cause people to quit projects or quit their jobs. It can cause mental problems such as anxiety or depression. It can lead to health problems like heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and other illnesses. Reduce stress by doing deep breathing exercises, meditating, running, or exercising regularly.

4. Reframe Challenges

If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.—Wayne Dyer

Another great way to hack your brain’s reward system is to change how you look at challenges in your life. A common problem is that many people see difficult work as an obstacle or simply something they don’t like doing.

A good strategy is to look at difficult situations and obstacles as opportunities that will help you and those around you grow. This will help us look at difficult things in a positive light and actually look forward to doing them instead of dreading them.

For example, if three employees on your team aren’t getting along with each other and two of them are thinking about quitting, don’t look at this as a very stressful, terrible problem. Instead, look at the situation as an opportunity to use your interpersonal skills to gather the angry employees together, let them voice their concerns, and then resolve the problem.

It will help them improve personally and professionally. It will also help you and your company prosper as well. You can also apply this same way of thinking to your personal life. If your friends or family members aren’t getting along, use the disagreement as a growth opportunity that will benefit them and you.

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When we can see difficult things as great opportunities, we’ll start to look forward to them. When we look forward to doing things, it makes the reward system in our brains reward us with more dopamine, and it increases the chances that we’ll look at future problems as opportunities to grow.

Conclusion

Motivation is a challenging part of personal and professional development. This is why motivational videos and motivational speeches are so popular. A central part of staying motivated, even during the most challenging times, is to understand how our brains work. Science has given us a good understanding of our brain’s reward system and the chemicals and pathways that allow it to shape our behavior.

Hack that reward system in your brain by taking on bigger challenges, visualizing success, avoiding excessive stress, and looking at difficult situations as opportunities to help others and help yourself grow.

When we begin to master our brains, we’ll be better able to master our lives and achieve those big goals.

More Tips on How to Stay Motivated

Featured photo credit: Giorgio Trovato via unsplash.com

Reference

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