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Quick Learners Do These 8 Different Things to Pick Up Anything Easily

Quick Learners Do These 8 Different Things to Pick Up Anything Easily

In most parts of the world today, education is seen as a right, not a privilege. Even if sometimes costly, every individual has, at least in theory, the possibility of studying anything he or she desires. In response to this massification of the educational system, the quantity of information has grown exponentially. Moreover, it has spread and diversified into innumerable domains, sub-domains and specializations.

Regardless, education is nothing if it does not provide a certain degree of general knowledge and culture of other fields. In order to prevent schools and colleges from spawning specialists that are laser-focused on their field alone, the practice of quick learning has gained increasing popularity in the last years.

However, tackling and even partly understanding a subject in a brief time can be extremely demanding. Mixing it with other starkly different matters of interest only adds more difficulty. As such, a few techniques and practices have to be adopted and mastered in order to successfully engage in quick learning.

They are masters of prioritizing

In order to be able to tackle different topics and a large quantity of information in a short period of time, the ability to self-organization is key. Quick learners are excellent in setting priorities[1] and achievable objectives for themselves.

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To do this successfully and consistently, one needs to play around his or her own personality and study habits as there are nearly as many learning styles as there are people. A careful, studied approach to a subject can save a lot of time and help outline its important parts.

They know how to motivate themselves

Connected to the previous point, benchmarking is the practice of organizing any task into sub-goals. This breaking down of a titanic assignment works well as an incentive. Humans are wired to receive a degree of satisfaction upon completing a task. For that reason, large and time-consuming activities can seem like an eternity.

Quick learners, however, use benchmarking to keep themselves motivated and energized throughout the entire time of the project or task. This keeps productivity at elevated levels and brings about the peace of mind specific to a job well done.

They are good at asking for help and collaborating

Lots of organized, disciplined and intelligent individuals make the mistake of relying solely on their own ability to cope with an immense amount of information. As a result, their data absorption rate is modest and their comprehension of the studied subject is approximate.

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By comparison, quick learners know how to collaborate and ask the right questions. By doing so, they lower the information load on themselves, allowing for a better understanding of diverse subjects. Students, for example, can now access collaborative learning platforms such as Edmodo[2], where they can engage with teachers, take quizzes in order to test their knowledge on various topics, as well as manage their progress.

They spend time and effort to revise and practice

Human memory is not perfect. As such, what was once thoroughly understood and memorized may sooner or later fade away. Foreign languages are the best example of this occurrence. Left unpracticed for a longer period of time, words and expressions are easily forgotten. Quick learners constantly go over what they have studied, rewriting or outlining notes in order to keep the information at least partly fresh.

They learn from every failure

Success, as prized as it is by society, can result in a weakening of the ability to deal with new and challenging circumstances. In short, failure can foster adaptability, whereas success is more likely to lead to overconfidence. Quick learners do not become frustrated and most of all, they do not give up. Instead, they extract new techniques and methods of learning from each failure.

They do the right thing in the right place

The importance of the surroundings during learning is evident to anyone. Focusing requires calm, quiet and a lack of distractions. However, changing the environment can have a significant impact on one’s ability to learn in that moment.

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As such, regularly switching from the usual dark room to the park or a library is beneficial and recommended. One trick is to tie a certain subject of interest to a location. For example, a med student may study embryology in the library, biochemistry at home and read up on anatomy in the park.

They rely on hard copies to help them concentrate better

Technology is greatly influencing learning styles. One of the visible changes is that smartphones, tablets and laptops are gradually pushing print out of the usual work space or classroom.

Nowadays, students no longer confine themselves for hours on end in the library to study dusty manuals, nor do they fight for who gets to use the single copy of a certain work. Instead, information is made readily available to them online. Papers, studies, reports, syntheses of greater books are all a click away.

However, when it comes to learning, researchers have found[3]that about 90% of students prefer hard copy or print for school work. Similarly, 92% would choose a printed version when dealing with a longer text. The same percent report to be able to concentrate better when reading a hard copy. Significantly, the same study reveals that 85% of American students said that they find it easier to multi-task when reading on a laptop or tablet.

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They choose to believe in themselves when there is any self-doubt

The traditional view is that to be able to understand and practice something, you need intelligence, skill, and good learning habits such as the aforementioned ones. However, according a private internet access Netflix expert[4] he said “it is an underlying sense of self-efficacy, personal agency and the motivational and behavioral processes to put these self-beliefs into effect.”

Simply put, educational psychologists have discovered the complex role that self-doubts, false beliefs, unfortunate self-monitoring and strategy choice dilemmas play in the cognitive process of learning. To be able to learn something is thus connected to one’s balance and beliefs about the self-motivation and self-confidence being prime movers towards success, something which quick learners have mastered.

By following these 8 techniques to appropriating information, quick learners are able not only to go over a large quantity of data, but to also achieve higher levels of comprehension. Their example might be the model of the future, a time in which information only continues to expand and to become more and more diversified.

Reference

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Ryan Holman

Writer & Blogger

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Last Updated on November 18, 2019

How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

Everyone of my team members has a bucketload of tasks that they need to deal with every working day. On top of that, most of their tasks are either creativity tasks or problem solving tasks.

Despite having loads of tasks to handle, our team is able to stay creative and work towards our goals consistently.

How do we manage that?

I’m going to reveal to you how I helped my team get more things done in less time through the power of correct prioritization. A few minutes spent reading this article could literally save you thousands of hours over the long term. So, let’s get started with my method on how to prioritize:

The Scales Method – a productivity method I created several years ago.

How to Prioritize with the Scales Method

    One of our new editors came to me the other day and told me how she was struggling to keep up with the many tasks she needed to handle and the deadlines she constantly needed to stick to.

    At the end of each day, she felt like she had done a lot of things but often failed to come up with creative ideas and to get articles successfully published. From what she told me, it was obvious that she felt overwhelmed and was growing increasingly frustrated about failing to achieve her targets despite putting in extra hours most days.

    After she listened to my advice – and I introduced her to the Scales Method – she immediately experienced a dramatic rise in productivity, which looked like this:

    • She could produce three times more creative ideas for blog articles
    • She could publish all her articles on time
    • And she could finish all her work on time every day (no more overtime!)

    Curious to find out how she did it? Read on for the step-by-step guide:

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    1. Set Aside 10 Minutes for Planning

    When it comes to tackling productivity issues, it makes sense to plan before taking action. However, don’t become so involved in planning that you become trapped in it and never move beyond first base.

    My recommendation is to give yourself a specific time period for planning – but keep it short. Ideally, 10 or 15 minutes. This should be adequate to think about your plan.

    Use this time to:

    • Look at the big picture.
    • Think about the current goal and target that you need/want to achieve.
    • Lay out all the tasks you need to do.

    2. Align Your Tasks with Your Goal

    This is the core component that makes the Scales Method effective.

    It works like this:

    Take a look at all the tasks you’re doing, and review the importance of each of them. Specifically, measure a task’s importance by its cost and benefit.

    By cost, I am referring to the effort needed per task (including time, money and other resources). The benefit is how closely the task can contribute to your goal.

      To make this easier for you, I’ve listed below four combinations that will enable you to quickly and easily determine the priority of each of your tasks:

      Low Cost + High Benefit

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      Do these tasks first because they’re the simple ones to complete, yet help you get closer to your goal.

      Approving artwork created for a sales brochure would likely fit this category. You could easily decide on whether you liked the artwork/layout, but your decision to approve would trigger the production of the leaflet and the subsequent sales benefits of sending it out to potential customers.

      High Cost + High Benefit

      Break the high cost task down into smaller ones. In other words, break the big task into mini ones that take less than an hour to complete. And then re-evaluate these small tasks and set their correct priority level.

      Imagine if you were asked to write a product launch plan for a new diary-free protein powder supplement. Instead of trying to write the plan in one sitting – aim to write the different sections at different times (e.g., spend 30 minutes writing the introduction, one hour writing the body text, and 30 minutes writing the conclusion).

      Low Cost + Low Benefit

      This combination should be your lowest priority. Either give yourself 10-15 minutes to handle this task, or put these kind of tasks in between valuable tasks as a useful break.

      These are probably necessary tasks (e.g., routine tasks like checking emails) but they don’t contribute much towards reaching your desired goal. Keep them way down your priority list.

      High Cost + Low Benefit

      Review if these tasks are really necessary. Think of ways to reduce the cost if you decide that the completion of the task is required.

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      For instance, can any tools or systems help to speed up doing the task? In this category, you’re likely to find things like checking and updating sales contacts spreadsheets. This can be a fiddly and time-consuming thing to do without making mistakes. However, there are plenty of apps out there they can make this process instant and seamless.

      Now, coming back to the editor who I referred to earlier, let’s take a look at her typical daily task list:

        After listening to my advice, she broke down the High cost+ High benefit task into smaller ones. Her tasks then looked like this (in order of priority):

          And for the task about promoting articles to different platforms, after reviewing its benefits, we decided to focus on the most effective platform only – thereby significantly lowering the associated time cost.

          Bonus Tip: Tackling Tasks with Deadlines

          Once you’ve evaluated your tasks, you’ll know the importance of each of them. This will immediately give you a crystal-clear picture on which tasks would help you to achieve more (in terms of achieving your goals). Sometimes, however, you won’t be able to decide every task’s priority because there’ll be deadlines set by external parties such as managers and agencies.

          What to do in these cases?

          Well, I suggest that after considering the importance and values of your current tasks, align the list with the deadlines and adjust the priorities accordingly.

          For example, let’s dip into the editor’s world again.

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          Some of the articles she edited needed to be published by specific dates. The Scales Method allows for this, and in this case, her amended task list would look something like this:

            Hopefully, you can now see how easy it is to evaluate the importance of tasks and how to order them in lists of priority.

            The Scales Method Is Different from Anything Else You’ve Tried

            By adopting the Scales Method, you’ll begin to correctly prioritize your work, and most importantly – boost your productivity by up to 10 times!

            And unlike other methods that don’t really explain how to decide the importance of a task, my method will help you break down each of your tasks into two parts: cost and benefits. My method will also help you to take follow-up action based on different cost and benefits combinations.

            Start right now by spending 10 minutes to evaluate your common daily tasks and how they align with your goal(s). Once you have this information, it’ll be super-easy to put your tasks into a priority list. All that remains, is that you kick off your next working day by following your new list.

            Trust me, once you begin using the Scales Method – you’ll never want to go back to your old ways of working.

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            Featured photo credit: Vector Stock via vectorstock.com

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