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Period A Week Early Is No Longer A Pain If You Know All These.

Period A Week Early Is No Longer A Pain If You Know All These.

However essential the monthlies are to procreation and female health in general, having them is always a pain.

As women, most of us have a love-hate relationship with our periods. We love it when they happen on time and are neither late nor early, and do not cause us too much of discomfort or hormonal hullabaloo; but still hate having them in general.

And while a late period could put us into panic if we are sexually active and practicing birth control (pregnancy scare!), having your period a week early is just as bad. If you have had a regular cycle up until now, it’s usually a tad alarming too. Here’s all that could be behind you getting your period a week early…

Hate Getting Period a Week Earlier?

Having a sudden early onset of periods can be quite the pain, literally and figuratively for it ruins so much. Be it that weekend you were planning with your significant other, or a quick vacation, or even that all-important job interview/presentation you had planned to ace – unexpected periods can put a spanner in your works, literally and figuratively.

Other than taking you unaware and causing embarrassing bleeds that show through your clothes, getting your period early also means that you need to figure out the hows and the whys behind it, instead of getting yourself all worked up.

How The Normal Period Cycle Works?

Not every woman’s period is the same, and normal periods tend to be a little different for everybody as well. Most girls will start their periods in their pre-teens or early teens, say 11-13. That said; it’s fairly normal for a girl to start having her period anywhere from eight years old to say about 15.

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A period cycle is counted from the first day of a period to the first day of the next period, mostly this is 28 days, especially if you are on the pill and regulated by it.

However for adult women, normal cycles can range from 21 to 35 days while for teens this could 21 to 45 days as well. [1]. The actual menstrual flow aka your period could vary as well and the bleeding could be as little as two to three days or as much as a whole week.

    Mostly though, within three years of you starting your first period, your periods should have stabilized into a cycle you know is yours. And it may not be run of the mill “normal” to begin with.

    Sometimes your cycle may also vary, be 27 days or sometimes 30 and another time you may get only a 24-day respite before you start with your menses again. This is still normal [2]

    When Should I See A Doctor About My Periods?

    To heavy or too light a flow, a debilitating pain during the period and sudden irregular cycles after years of having normal ones are times you should head to the doc about your periods to rule out any hormonal or health issues.

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    Also if your period skips a month or two and you are not pregnant, if you feel sick after tampon use or even the fact that you are 15 and still not had your period yet could all be cause to make an appointment.

    Reasons For Getting Your Period A Week Early

    So we have established that sometimes, getting your period a week early is basically no biggie. There are so many different reasons for getting an early period, including harmless ones like a change in diet or physical exercise, stress, weight, sleep or any other little or big change in your routine.

    Face it, the human body is a weird thing indeed, with plenty more weirdness that science is still at a loss to understand. If you have been through any changes in life, and your period comes early, be happy that your body is well and responding to that external stimuli. It really is no big deal.

    Reason 1: You Are Stressed

    Stress tends to affect periods in weird ways. Too much of it can throw your body out of whack and cause stress hormones to rise, which in turn affects the pituitary gland that in turn affects the ovaries – causing early periods, late periods and even missed periods [3]

    If you have got your period a week early, see if there is anything in your life stressing you out, and then try to make positive changes around it to regularize your menstrual cycle [4]

    Reason 2: You Have Lost Or Gained Weight

    How much you weigh can affect your periods in myriad ways. Simply because how much you weight affects hormone production and so in turn changes your cycle for good, or bad.

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    A sudden weight loss brought on by too much of dieting, a hardcore exercise routine or even an illness can cause your till now normal cycle to shrug off its responsibility and go haywire.

    Similarly, a serious weight gain, which in turn could also be a sign of hormonal imbalance to begin with, can throw your menstrual cycle out of gear and cause you to get your period a week early, or even a week late [5].

    To regularise your period, stay within healthy weight parameters and eat balanced meals.

    Reason 3: You Have Started Or Stopped Birth Control

    Be it those tiny pills, that IUD or any other birth control mechanism, these things try to regulate your cycle through hormones and may temporarily cause a hormonal imbalance in your body, before it all simmers down to normalcy (and in the case of pills, lighter periods that are like clockwork!).

    Starting or stopping birth control can cause your periods to misbehave and come early, late or skip a time entirely [6].

    Reason 4: There Has Been A Change, Any Change

    So while things like these are completely unrelated to your periods (or so you may think), sometimes just a change in your lifestyle can bring about a change in your period, causing you to get your period a week early, a week late or mayhaps none at all.

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    Pregnancy can bring about spotting (and sometimes, unfortunately, a miscarriage as well) and you may mistake this for an early period, especially if you are unaware about you being pregnant.

    You might have popped a morning after pill (Oh my god I forgot my birth control). Or you may have started a diet, or stopped one, or just hiked yourself silly, or moved cities… You may suddenly be having an active sex life, or broken up with the love of your life, breaking your heart in the process.

    Many an extrinsic factor can affect your period, and frankly, it is okay that your body is aware of these changes and accordingly responds to it [7]

    Reason 5: You May Have An STI/STD

    So in case you were bit adventurous in the sack with the wrong kind of guy, you may have landed up with an STI – and sometimes STIs remain sneakily inconspicuous with the only symptom being bleeding between periods, which you may mistake for an early period.

    However if your “early period” has a way lighter than normal flow, its time you think about your bedroom activities and head to the doctor [8].

    Reason 6: You Have Pre-Existing Gynecological Issues

    If you have been diagnosed with PCOS, uterine fibroids, endometriosis (abnormally heavy endometrium) and or any other uterine or ovarian issue, irregular periods may just be part and parcel of your life.

    If you have not yet been diagnosed but have faced irregular periods for long, its time you did go and get yourself checked to rule out any minor or serious underlying health issues that may be causing those irregular periods [9].

    So that’s it, the reasons behind you getting an early period can be something as simple as stress, or as serious as an STI/STD. Remember to rethink all that has happened to you before making any snap judgments and feel free to visit the doctor in case you feel that something is up… The key is not to panic and find out the underlying cause, so that you can make positive changes around it.

    Reference

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    Rima Pundir

    Health, Wellness & Productivity Writer

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    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

    1. Work on the small tasks.

    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

    2. Take a break from your work desk.

    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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    3. Upgrade yourself

    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

    4. Talk to a friend.

    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

    7. Read a book (or blog).

    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

    8. Have a quick nap.

    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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    9. Remember why you are doing this.

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

    10. Find some competition.

    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

    11. Go exercise.

    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

    12. Take a good break.

    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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