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We Travel Not To Escape Life, But For Life Not To Escape Us

We Travel Not To Escape Life, But For Life Not To Escape Us

Sometimes, after many weeks of work, eat, weekend, we start to wonder “what am I doing with my life?” It’s about then that we decide to take a vacation just to get away from it all. Many people seem to believe that traveling is a way to escape life, but that suggests that life is just a series of workdays, sleeping, weekends, and eating. The truth is that this daily grind is where life tends to escape us. Traveling is a great way to break the monotony and bring back our love of life.

A Life Without Travel

Can you imagine what it would be like if we weren’t allowed to take a break and go traveling somewhere? They say time flies when you’re having fun. That’s not exactly true. According to some studies, time actually flies when your brain doesn’t have to devote much energy to the world around it.[1] When we experience the same settings, environment, and challenges every day, our brain perceives time as passing very quickly.

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Alternatively, when we do something different, our brains tend to perceive the experience as lasting a long while. Not only that but we probably also feel the memories of a new event are more vivid and interesting. For example, you might remember your trip to Hawaii quite well and remember the exact sequence of events as it took place during that trip. On the other hand, you would probably have to think pretty hard to differentiate Tuesday from Wednesday, or Monday.

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We Were Not Meant For Monotony

Our ancestors didn’t sit in the same office building every day, drive to work by the same roads in the same car, and go home to the same house every night. Each day was a surprise and a blessing. Sure, each day was also filled with a ridiculous amount danger, and the nomadic life wasn’t a very long one, but each day was interesting! We should be grateful for the safety that modern life offers us, but we shouldn’t forget that we’re also built for a bit of adventure!

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Traveling Increases Our Happiness

Travel gives us new experiences, memories, and even aids our way towards self-discovery.[2] Few people ever change or make memories by staying in the same place doing the same things. Travel introduces us to new challenges, new scenery, and new people. Now when you hear the phrase “travel broadens the mind” you’ll know what it means!

How To Make Time For Travel

Below is a short list of suggestions for saving money and making time for traveling. It’s important to remember that you don’t have to go to a different country or take a long trip. You can go camping in a forest you’ve never been to or visit other states! The important thing is to allow yourself a change of scenery every once in a while.

  1. Keep a Travel Jar. Put your spare change in this jar and encourage yourself and your family to put money in the jar that they might have used on something like eating out or junk food.
  2. Try eating out less. You’ll be surprised how much money you save just by sticking to home cooked meals.
  3. Make a list of places you want to visit. Post it on your wall to remind you that it’s a goal within reach!
  4. Contact far-away friends. Most of us have friends who have moved or who live far away from us. Call them! Ask if you can visit for a week. Most of them will love having visitors.
  5. Put together a travel group. This is great if you don’t have a lot of family and you don’t like going places on your own. Start planning trips with a group of friends.

It’s important to remember that life isn’t all about hard knocks and work. Life should also be about adventure and enjoyment. We should all take some time for ourselves to get out of our comfort zones and travel away from the places we’re used to. We’ll be happier, smarter, more open-minded, and we’ll have memories that can last us a lifetime.

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Reference

[1]Scientific American: Why Does Time Fly?
[2]CNN Travel: Travel Makes us Happy: Here’s Why

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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