Advertising
Advertising

If You Want Better Mental Health, You Should Use Your Journal In This Way

If You Want Better Mental Health, You Should Use Your Journal In This Way

Most experts and psychologists recommend keeping a journal because journaling is a great stress reliever and by being this, it’s helpful for anyone under emotional or mental stress. But a new kind of journaling is in town – that of the bullet journal, and it is more helpful than ever in improving emotional balance and mental health of those who decide to do it.

Many of us might have started writing a journal some time or the other, only to let it slide whenever times becomes harder. But with a bullet journal – all it takes is 10 minutes to let out those emotions, keep a track of physical fitness and plan your days, weeks and months in advance!

What is a Bullet Journal?

It may sound a bit complicated and tough – but a bullet journal is simply a bulleted version of a Dear Diary, with the added benefit of it also being a planner and a to-do list. You can use any journal, any pen, be as creative as you want and still have the mental health benefits of lowering your stress, keeping a tab on your feelings, have a cathartic outlet and be organized in your daily life as well as overall life goals. Here are five tips for you to best use that bullet journal for emotional and mental health.

Advertising

1. KISS the Layout

By this, we don’t mean you pucker one up for the journal. Rather, keep your layout simple, and something that you can remember. The idea is for you to be able to organize your life and goals a little better, and have an outlet for your emotions – thereby keeping you in the pink of mental health. Start your bullet journal with an index – like a book, marking important topics to page numbers. The next few pages could be a yearly future log and for other important things. You can then move from month to month.

    2. Use different keys

    To make things more organized, use different bullets for different things – to-do, done, postponed, notes, events, achievements, important and so on. Keep a key at the end of the diary for you to remember what the bullets mean.

    Advertising

      3. Make a monthly habit tracker

      Keep two pages free at the beginning of each month to keep a log of all that happened – on top, jot down the dates of that month, and on the left you can write down your goals, whatever they may be. For example, mine would read – did not get angry, Yoga, ate fruit, unplugged by 10, completed all articles due…

      Draw a grid like structure (think Excel) and then color each square on the date you did achieve your goals. At the end of the month, you’ll be able to see where you scored and where you lag. This can help you be more organized in achieving your goals – and in turn, your achievements will help you be in a better state of mind, ergo, better mental health.

      Advertising

        4. Keep a monthly gratitude log

        The last page of each month should be your gratitude log, one thing that you were thankful for each day of the month. Think of it as counting your blessings – it’s sure to put you in a cheerful spirit and give you better mental health.

        Advertising

          5. Remember, it’s all for you

          Lastly, remember that your diary is meant only for you. You don’t have to beautify it for others, or hide the truth from yourself in it – it’s meant to be a tool for you to help you be better at all that you want to be better at, to give you happiness and better mental health. Be painfully honest, and keep it as messy or as organised as you like.

          Keep the journal as real as it can be – this will help you assess and pinpoint your weak points – use it to turn over a new leaf on an everyday basis.

          Featured photo credit: TinyRayOfSunshine via static1.squarespace.com

          More by this author

          Rima Pundir

          Health, Wellness & Productivity Writer

          Stiff Muscles Make You Feel Sick Often: 8 Natural Muscle Relaxers You Can’t Miss When You Drive And Don’t Drink Enough Water, It’s As Dangerous As Drunk Driving Having A Glass Of This Drink Before You Sleep Can Burn Your Fat Insanely Fast How Common Language Can Help You Strengthen Your Friendship Introducing 13 Useful Free Apps For you To Install Today

          Trending in Health

          1 12 Things That May Cause Breast Cancer You Should Avoid 2 How to Eliminate Work Stress When You’re Stressed to the Max 3 Do Vitamins for Weight Loss Work And How? 4 Is It Possible to Repay Your Sleep Debt? Why Being Well Rested Matters 5 15 Simple Ways To Overcome Depression And Sadness

          Read Next

          Advertising
          Advertising
          Advertising

          Last Updated on February 15, 2019

          Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

          Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

          In Personal Development-speak, we are always talking about goals, outcomes, success, desires and dreams. In other words, all the stuff we want to do, achieve and create in our world.

          And while it’s important for us to know what we want to achieve (our goal), it’s also important for us to understand why we want to achieve it; the reason behind the goal or some would say, our real goal.

          Why is goal setting important?

          1. Your needs and desire will be fulfilled.

          Sometimes when we explore our “why”, (why we want to achieve a certain thing) we realize that our “what” (our goal) might not actually deliver us the thing (feeling, emotion, internal state) we’re really seeking.

          For example, the person who has a goal to lose weight in the belief that weight loss will bring them happiness, security, fulfillment, attention, popularity and the partner of their dreams. In this instance, their “what” is weight-loss and their “why” is happiness (etc.) and a partner.

          Advertising

          Six months later, they have lost the weight (achieved their goal) but as is often the case, they’re not happier, not more secure, not more confident, not more fulfilled and in keeping with their miserable state, they have failed to attract their dream partner.

          After all, who wants to be with someone who’s miserable? They achieved their practical goal but still failed to have their needs met.

          So they set a goal to lose another ten pounds. And then another. And maybe just ten more. With the destructive and erroneous belief that if they can get thin enough, they’ll find their own personal nirvana. And we all know how that story ends.

          2. You’ll find out what truly motivates you

          The important thing in the process of constructing our best life is not necessarily what goals we set (what we think we want) but what motivates us towards those goals (what we really want).

          The sooner we begin to explore, identify and understand what motivates us towards certain achievements, acquisitions or outcomes (that is, we begin moving towards greater consciousness and self awareness), the sooner we will make better decisions for our life, set more intelligent (and dare I say, enlightened) goals and experience more fulfilment and less frustration.

          Advertising

          We all know people who have achieved what they set out to, only to end up in the same place or worse (emotionally, psychologically, sociologically) because what they were chasing wasn’t really what they were needing.

          What we think we want will rarely provide us with what we actually need.

          3. Your state of mind will be a lot healthier

          We all set specific goals to achieve/acquire certain things (a job, a car, a partner, a better body, a bank balance, a title, a victory) because at some level, most of us believe (consciously or not) that the achievement of those goals will bring us what we really seek; joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

          Of course, setting practical, material and financial goals is an intelligent thing to do considering the world we live in and how that world works.

          But setting goals with an expectation that the achievement of certain things in our external, physical world will automatically create an internal state of peace, contentment, joy and total happiness is an unhealthy and unrealistic mindset to inhabit.

          Advertising

          What you truly want and need

          Sometimes we need to look beyond the obvious (superficial) goals to discover and secure what we really want.

          Sadly, we live in a collective mindset which teaches that the prettiest and the wealthiest are the most successful.

          Some self-help frauds even teach this message. If you’re rich or pretty, you’re happy. If you’re both, you’re very happy. Pretty isn’t what we really want; it’s what we believe pretty will bring us. Same goes with money.

          When we cut through the hype, the jargon and the self-help mumbo jumbo, we all have the same basic goals, desires and needs:

          Joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

          Advertising

          Nobody needs a mansion or a sport’s car but we all need love.

          Nobody needs massive pecs, six percent body-fat, a face lift or bigger breasts but we all need connection, acceptance and understanding.

          Nobody needs to be famous but we all need peace, calm, balance and happiness.

          The problem is, we live in a culture which teaches that one equals the other. If only we lived in a culture which taught that real success is far more about what’s happening in our internal environment, than our external one.

          It’s a commonly-held belief that we’re all very different and we all have different goals — whether short term or long term goals. But in many ways we’re not, and we don’t; we all want essentially the same things.

          Now all you have to do is see past the fraud and deception and find the right path.

          Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

          Read Next